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Another option for Bevel Meisters

post #1 of 17
Thread Starter 

From the Toko dealer disk to add to your bag of tricks:

 

Matching/verifying side edge bevel angle relative to the guide. Good back lighting and magnification helps:

 

post #2 of 17

I like clamping my true bar (a machined aluminum block I made in college) to the side edge guide and then eyeballing to figure out what side edge angle is on a ski.  With the SVST guide and shims, it's pretty easy to narrow it down.

post #3 of 17

I would think that magnification would be a must.  I've actually tried this before, but without magnification and I thought I was good until I noticed that slight movements that changed placement still looked the same to me on the edge.

post #4 of 17
Thread Starter 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by skier219 View Post

 

I like clamping my true bar (a machined aluminum block I made in college) to the side edge guide and then eyeballing to figure out what side edge angle is on a ski.  With the SVST guide and shims, it's pretty easy to narrow it down.

 

Try a metal true bar with a magnet at midpoint that snaps TRUE to the edge.

post #5 of 17

Most skis are base high.

The magnetic angle finders do not allow a correct determination of base bevel with this condition.

These tools work fine when measuring side bevel but a good measurement of base bevel is hard to make.

post #6 of 17

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by dakine View Post

 

Most skis are base high.

The magnetic angle finders do not allow a correct determination of base bevel with this condition.

These tools work fine when measuring side bevel but a good measurement of base bevel is hard to make.

 

You kind of lost me here.  It's generally assumed that you would be measuring these angles on a tuned ski (thus not base high).  Since the base is used as a reference for setting bevels you better be sure that it's flat and true to the side edges.

post #7 of 17

I agree, Noodler. I'm not sure where the statistic that "most skis are base high" comes from, but even if it is true, it's the first thing you should fix before worrying much about base edge bevels.

 

Frankly, I'm not sure why measuring existing bevels is really all that critical anyway, unless you're tuning someone else's skis, and they don't know what bevel they want, but they like the tune they have and want it the same. I just bevel my skis the way I want them. I couldn't care less what bevel they started out with. If suspect that I may be changing the existing side edge bevel, I'll usually "paint" the edge with a magic marker so I can see when I've achieved the bevel (when I've removed all the color).

 

Of course, it is hard work to reduce base edge bevel with hand tools. It is helpful to be able to roughly measure the base edge bevel to see if it is more than you want. If so, prepare for some work with files and a base plane, or a trip to a good stone grinder.

 

Best regards,

Bob

post #8 of 17
Thread Starter 

Regarding reasons measuring existing base bevels:

  • to answer the proverbial (What are my bevels?) question by ones self
  • to check your work. Did you in fact match your guide?
  • simple curiosity
  • to look like you know what you're doing to impress your buds

 

post #9 of 17

I just take my DMT diamondstone, measure out 6 cm.  Press one end against the base edge, and see how much the other end rises over the base.  If I can fit a dime underneath, then it's about 1 degree.

post #10 of 17

Hey you Darrells the subject matter by the OP was side edge bevels not base edge!

post #11 of 17

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Atomicman View Post

 

Hey you Darrells the subject matter by the OP was side edge bevels not base edge!

 

who cares about the side edge?  It's the base edge that's more important.

post #12 of 17


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by mrzinwin View Post

 

I just take my DMT diamondstone, measure out 6 cm.  Press one end against the base edge, and see how much the other end rises over the base.  If I can fit a dime underneath, then it's about 1 degree.

If you use a true bar edge marked 6 cm from the edge, and then set that line on the outside beveled base edge. The distance in millimeters from the inside of the true bar to the base, will be the base angle in degrees. Simple geometry taught to me from Mike DeSantis WC tuner to the stars.
 

If you've got the thickness of a dime, I can bet you that it's more than one degree. It's probably over two.

 

Mike

post #13 of 17

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by ctskierguy View Post

 


 

If you use a true bar edge marked 6 cm from the edge, and then set that line on the outside beveled base edge. The distance in millimeters from the inside of the true bar to the base, will be the base angle in degrees. Simple geometry taught to me from Mike DeSantis WC tuner to the stars.
 

If you've got the thickness of a dime, I can bet you that it's more than one degree. It's probably over two.

 

Mike

 

The dime is about 1.2 mm thick.  Definitely not 2 mm.  So if a dime fits (with a little clearance), the base bevel is probably close to 1.5 degrees.   Although this is assuming that the base is flat.

 

And by the way, the 6 cm line needs to allign with the inside of the edge, not the outside (although it probably makes little difference).

 

However, 1.5 degree base bevel is still disappointing, considering that I just got my bases

stoneground .  Does anyone know of any good tuning shops near NYC?

post #14 of 17

WELL, not exactly. But  base bevel is damn important, but so is side edge.

 

Try some really hard snow with a 1 degree side edge bevel and report back how much you enjoy that!

post #15 of 17

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Atomicman View Post

 

WELL, not exactly. But  base bevel is damn important, but so is side edge.

 

Try some really hard snow with a 1 degree side edge bevel and report back how much you enjoy that!

 

True, but half a degree off on the base bevel is much worse than on the side bevel.  (That's why I'm somewhat pissed that my base bevel is 1.5 after a base grind....)

post #16 of 17

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by mrzinwin View Post

  

True, but half a degree off on the base bevel is much worse than on the side bevel.  (That's why I'm somewhat pissed that my base bevel is 1.5 after a base grind....)

 

Completely agree - and I would be totally ticked too.

post #17 of 17


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by mrzinwin View Post

 

  Does anyone know of any good tuning shops near NYC?


 

I don't know anyone near the city, but you could always ship them to either Graham Lonetto at Edgewise(VT) or Mike DeSantis at SkiMD(MA).

Either one of them will make your skis better than new. Once that's been done, maintenace on the bases and edges will be too simple as well.

 

Mike

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