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Monoski? Yay or Nay? - Page 3

post #61 of 75

Really Joe?  It was an AWESOME day for some AWESOME people.  I'm hoping I got you all wrong!

post #62 of 75
Thread Starter 

Random Google redirect? Your first Epic post drags up a thread that I started four years ago and was last active three years ago? Really yourself. 

 

Not sure what I said that could ruin your great day from four years ago, either. The monoskis looked pretty goofy and awkward to use. The majority of snow enthusiasts seem to agree, which is why you see them once every four years, if that (I haven't seen one yet this year). I did ask for input as to whether it's fun or not, so if you have any, feel free. 

post #63 of 75

Quote:

Originally Posted by Acrophobia View Post

I've heard the monoski described as something that combines all the disadvantages of snowboarding and skiing.

 

The other day at Whistler I saw a tele-monoski.  Why????

Classic.

Answer to question: To combine all the disadvantages of telemarking and monoskiing?

 

One advantage of a monoski:

 

Photo John Martin                                                                                                                                 Monopalooza 2013

 

Monopalooza 2013 was just held at Vail.

http://www.facebook.com/events/356867631057789/

post #64 of 75

"The monoskis looked pretty goofy and awkward to use. The majority of snow enthusiasts seem to agree"

 

I totally disagree about them being goofy and awkward and the majority of snow enthusiast have never tried to monoski so their opinions are irrelevant.

 

Six years ago I purchased my first monoski and I haven't looked back. I sold my skis the very next year and average 50-70 days a year on my mono. The claims about poor balance, restrictive movement and other speculative statements made by those with little or no experience are largely bogus.  My preferred terrain is uber steep and super technical (i.e. tight trees full of cliffs) and I can't imagine riding it on anything other than a mono. I am so much better a monoskier than I ever was a skier and that shift happened during the my very first season on a mono.  It's also a dream on moguls and makes top hopping even big bumps on steep slopes easy.  I agree that the mono sucks on bullet proof hard-pack and icy bumps but WTF are you doing skiing those things anyway? To each their own I guess but that's not my cup of tea.  My bindings are fairly cranked (10-11) to avoid a premature release, but when they go it's almost always a double release. That's no different a binding set up than anyone on two planks skiing the same terrain. And hey, at least they do release unlike a snowboard. I also have poles which makes traversing easier than snowboarding though admittedly skis are best for traversing. I also use AT boots so hiking to terrain (which I regularly do) is not a problem either. As far as people looking funny with their rears swishing like "sexy Flanders" and their arms out like they're on a crucifix, I had that issue with my first board but that went away with a new board and a more neutral stance (Scott Gordon is a genius when it comes to getting you set up properly). The only downsides I have encountered are the following:

 

1) If you're in the gnar and staring at the edge of something scary, you're going down it one way or another (i.e. you can't side step out of danger like on skis or monkey back up a slope like people do on snowboards).

2) It is not a tool for backcountry skiing. Spit-board monos are expensive and snowshoes are slow.

 

There are advantages and disadvantages to every snow tool we use and monoskis are no different.  Other than that, to each their own.

post #65 of 75

^^^^ OK, if you say so, but I'm unclear on why a monoski is preferable to a slalom (directional) snowboard. Which also allows serious speed and crazy carving angles, has its own competitions if you are into that, but is lighter, way cheaper, offers more choices, and the boots are more fun to walk around in...

post #66 of 75
Quote:
Originally Posted by beyond View Post

^^^^ OK, if you say so, but I'm unclear on why a monoski is preferable to a slalom (directional) snowboard. Which also allows serious speed and crazy carving angles, has its own competitions if you are into that, but is lighter, way cheaper, offers more choices, and the boots are more fun to walk around in...

 

A monoski is symmetrical as compared to any kind of snowboard, even the hardboot alpine variety.  All snowboards have some sort of tilt and body asymmetry towards the fallline.

post #67 of 75

Yeah, realize that. But as you prolly know, folks can truly rip on directional snowboards, get those elbows on the snow going, and the boot angles are different enough from a regular board that the asymmetry is lessened. Anyway, except for the (reduced) blind-spot issue, not clear why asymmetry is a bad thing in and of itself. Aesthetics? IMO a boarder in powder looks a lot like a surfer on a curl; not many sights better. A monoskier looks like, uh, someone on that board for the first time. We regular skiers fall somewhere in the middle. (Pun there I'll ignore.) Edge to edge reaction time? Could be a factor, but in reality how much quicker than quick do we need? And finally, the last monoski I saw did not exactly lend itself to graceful movement on low pitch surfaces. Poling on a mono may be slightly less hilarious than frog hopping on a snowboard, but with the latter you can also get a flexible boot out and pushing on the snow in about 5 secs. Which looks familiar enough from all the skateboarders around that it doesn't even produce a second glance. 

post #68 of 75

I'm not a side slider plain and simple. I'm also not into racing as I already mentioned and my AT boots are plenty comfortable.

 

As far as your comment, "A monoskier looks like, uh, someone on that board for the first time." I think you're likely talking about someone who, uh, probably is on the board for the first time or brings it out for fun on gaper day. As far as reaction time, I'm standing on 210mm underfoot and can turn (literally) on a dime. Spinning in a 180 (or a 360) is a piece of cake on everything from flat ground to steep slopes.  Again, as I pointed out above, the descriptions given show little more than a lack of understanding of the physics and technique involved with monoskiing. Two legs together are far more powerful than when they become separated, like on skis. While admittedly I'm only working with an outside edge (just like a snowboard), I use both feet to control my edge. I drive forward with my uphill knee to initiate my turn just like on skis except that it's working in conjunction with my other leg to operate a single fat ski. It took me a day to learn how to monoski like sexy flanders and a season (and a better monoski) to hold my own with friends.

 

This guy doesn't look like he's on a "board for the first time":

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xodKlVFOVVo

 

This looks a whole lot like surfing:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WQedmzfT1Ng

 

This is what an amateur like me looks like getting up to cruising speed before dropping into a steep tree chute.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=b7VEIwks4Qw

post #69 of 75
Quote:
Originally Posted by beyond View Post

Yeah, realize that. But as you prolly know, folks can truly rip on directional snowboards, get those elbows on the snow going, and the boot angles are different enough from a regular board that the asymmetry is lessened. Anyway, except for the (reduced) blind-spot issue, not clear why asymmetry is a bad thing in and of itself. Aesthetics? IMO a boarder in powder looks a lot like a surfer on a curl; not many sights better. A monoskier looks like, uh, someone on that board for the first time. We regular skiers fall somewhere in the middle. (Pun there I'll ignore.) Edge to edge reaction time? Could be a factor, but in reality how much quicker than quick do we need? And finally, the last monoski I saw did not exactly lend itself to graceful movement on low pitch surfaces. Poling on a mono may be slightly less hilarious than frog hopping on a snowboard, but with the latter you can also get a flexible boot out and pushing on the snow in about 5 secs. Which looks familiar enough from all the skateboarders around that it doesn't even produce a second glance. 


I suspect you're just jealous because his ski is fatter than yours!tongue.gif

post #70 of 75
Quote:
Originally Posted by beyond View Post

Yeah, realize that. But as you prolly know, folks can truly rip on directional snowboards, get those elbows on the snow going, and the boot angles are different enough from a regular board that the asymmetry is lessened. Anyway, except for the (reduced) blind-spot issue, not clear why asymmetry is a bad thing in and of itself. Aesthetics? IMO a boarder in powder looks a lot like a surfer on a curl; not many sights better. A monoskier looks like, uh, someone on that board for the first time. We regular skiers fall somewhere in the middle. (Pun there I'll ignore.) Edge to edge reaction time? Could be a factor, but in reality how much quicker than quick do we need? And finally, the last monoski I saw did not exactly lend itself to graceful movement on low pitch surfaces. Poling on a mono may be slightly less hilarious than frog hopping on a snowboard, but with the latter you can also get a flexible boot out and pushing on the snow in about 5 secs. Which looks familiar enough from all the skateboarders around that it doesn't even produce a second glance. 

 

Asymmetry has built in inefficiencies, it's not about aesthetics. You're got a lead foot and a trailing foot and your body is tilted one way.   So all the stuff about how people look isn't the point.

There is nothing inherently wrong with some level of asymmetry, it's completely fine.  People can ski the whole mountain and then some on snowboards, and snowboarding in all it's forms are more popular than hardboots/monoskis.

 

But being symmetrical will be a bit more efficient way of applying power to the snow and not having to work around having two different kinds of turns in your pocket with slightly differing characteristics of either turn.  Push any boarder to the limit and they will do one type of turn stronger than the other.  Or ask them to do a gliding traverse over 2miles of flat cattrack and they have to exert a lot of energy overcoming the built-in tilt

You asked why a monoski over a board, the symmetry and what you get from that would be the main thing.

 

All the subie owners over in the best ski-car thread will tell you the same about symmetry too.

post #71 of 75

I'd go for a monoski/sit-ski instead.

post #72 of 75

So a question of semantics. I saw my first mono skiers at Powder Mtn last month. They were two companions together. Does that make them a "duo," or, my first thought "mono a mono."

D1

post #73 of 75

Monoman usually rides alone. However, when greeting a fellow monoskier, it is always "mono-a-mono."

post #74 of 75
Quote:
Originally Posted by Smushie View Post

Monoman usually rides alone. However, when greeting a fellow monoskier, it is always "mono-a-mono."

Mono-onbeercheer.gif

post #75 of 75

monoboard is for Babes. Yep!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=x3UciXXhqF4

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