EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › General Skiing Discussion › Skier Dies after days lost - I'm embarassed
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Skier Dies after days lost - I'm embarassed - Page 4

post #91 of 100

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by gramboh View Post

The problem with this suit (from the public's perspective) is the RCMP admitted they made a mistake, which will probably form the basis for the complaint. Personally I think the guy should lose because there are CLEAR warnings (e.g. a fence line) that you have to cross to leave the boundary and a reasonable person would not do so expecting rescue. You are responsible for yourself. Also from a common sense perspective, these idiots skied off the back of a ridge at KHMR that drops about 4000' into the wilderness. There is no clear way to get back to town from there other than climbing directly back up the ridge. I don't know what the hell they were thinking.

 

I don't want the precident set that the RCMP/volunteer non-profit SAR are somehow legally responsible to find idiots within X days who don't take any reasonsable steps to assure their own safety.

 

Anyone know if there are even wolves in that area in the winter?

 

Also, there is spotty cell phone coverage within the actual resort area, but off the back of the ridge there would be none whatsoever without a sat phone.


The guy actually had quite a bit of outdoor experience.  The trouble is it was in Quebec and Ontario, and maybe Manitoba.  He was from somewhere North of Quebec City.  For you Westerners, if you have a mountain there, its a single mountain.  If you keep going around it, with uphill on your left say, you eventually get around it.  It's not like a ridge line where you end up going for days or maybe weeks before you find a pass.

post #92 of 100

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ghost View Post

 If you keep going around it, with uphill on your left say, you eventually get around it.  It's not like a ridge line where you end up going for days or maybe weeks before you find a pass.

I'm sorry but this doesn't make him any less idiot. You really don't need to be super genius to find out, walking with ridge line on your left (or on your right) won't bring you around the mountain in hour or two, like it would, when you are walking around single mountain/hill.

post #93 of 100

I agree.  He shouldn't have gone into the BC without some idea of the topography.  He should have realized he would have to climb back up at some point.

post #94 of 100

What this tragic event comes down to is the perfect storm of miscues from several angles and lots of things that could have/should have been done differently, starting with a nice couple going on an adventure that they were not prepared for, and ending with a lot of "what if"'s

 What if........

 

 

  • The couple had been better prepared for venturing BC
  • Someone had taken action when the car remained in the parking lot
  • Aggressive action were taken at the time of a first call
  • Rescuers quit doing what they do for fear of liability

 

 

post #95 of 100

Another what if...

What if they'd stayed on groomers and an out of control skier hit one of them causing injury or death?

 

What level of risk do we accept when we choose how and where we ski? 

post #96 of 100

The level of risk assumption Q should be easy:  obvious potential risk of serious injury or death from a variety of causes.  Statistically skiing and riding aren't that dangerous, but the potential is there and the choice if you don't like it is to not ski.

 

On the what if's point, you know the saying about good experience and judgment coming from surviving bad judgements and mistakes?  I've certainly gotten way lost before, and put myself in a number of other stupid situations.  Bad luck sometimes clusters around some people -- some people routinely do stupiud stuff and so have the odds go against them repeatedly -- but you can't know that by looking at one bad outcome.  The finger-pointing after the fact can be really pointless because we all either know or can easily learn how to avoid obvious mistakes without looking at one accident.  I know how not to get lost and am still confident I'll get lost again in the future.

 

The only certainty should be you can't sue if things go bad.

post #97 of 100
Quote:
Originally Posted by newfydog View Post

 


 

You left out the man eating wolves.


There are thousands of people who are 'missing'........no one knows where they are.   They are just gone.

They have all been eaten by wolves.  There are no documented cases of this because the 'wildlife' doesn't make reports.
post #98 of 100
Might it be possible that the greenhorn mistook coyotes for wolves there?

Teenage folk singer Taylor Mitchell killed by coyotes

A teenage folk singer has died after being set upon by two coyotes as she hiked alone in a national park in Nova Scotia.
post #99 of 100
 You beat me. I was gonna post that here too.
post #100 of 100
Thread Starter 
That's a weird one.  First off, my condolences to her family.  Hearing something like this must be more gutwrenching than almost any other way of losing a child.

I'm no wildlife expert, but....

Coyotes are opportunistic hunters, and very adaptable.  Still, I do not recall hearing of any cases of them attacking full grown people.  I understand one of the issues is determining if they were juveniles, and didn't 'know' any better; or perhaps sick or rabid, and thus acted out of 'character'.  I know they will often, and somewhat brazenly, go after small pets, at least here in Calgary they are known to.

As an aside, I recall reading somewhere that there has never been a recorded instance, in North America, of a healthy wolf attacking a healthy human.  Anyone know/understand more or better??
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: General Skiing Discussion
EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › General Skiing Discussion › Skier Dies after days lost - I'm embarassed