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Best way to plug holes on skis - Page 2

post #31 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by skier219 View Post

 

 

All excellent advice.  

 

So what's your comfort level for snugging the screws?  I usually drive them in gently until they stop, check to make sure the binding is perfectly flat to the ski by holding the ski up to a light, then turn any of the screws more as needed to pull the binding flat (toe pieces are cake, but there always seems to be 1 stubborn screw on heel pieces for whatever reason).  At that point, I alternate over the screws in a star pattern and try to give them a teeny bit of extra oomph to snug down (generally about 1/16 of a turn or less).

 

 

For me, it's entirely a feel thing.  Basically, there's a point at which the ski is "telling me to stop" and I stop.  But the screws are snug--no question about that.  

 

A good experiment you can do, is to torque the screws until they are snug.  Then, wait a while.  Then unscrew them.  If it's too easy to unscrew, then you should torque them more.  But basically, I torque them until the screw serious starts to resist my torquing--and then I stop.

 

So far, I've only mounted tyrolia railflex plates, so I dunno if it's the same for regular bindings.  But I think it should be.  I don't worry about the binding being flat to the ski.  Once all the screws are torqued, the binding is always flat.  My problem is that the binding isn't always centered perfectly.  That's why I will purposely screw in one screw completely tightly before all others--so I can get the binding perfectly centered on the ski.  I am usually still off by half a mm or so, but it's not really significant.

post #32 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by Alpinord View Post

 

In your opinion, if you tap wood skis or others without metal topsheets, do you use a 4.1 or the typical 3.5 bit?

 

I tried it both ways on a pair of old test skis, and the larger bit works much better.  I use a 5/32" bit, which works out closer to 4.0mm.

post #33 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by Alpinord View Post

 

 

Hmmmmm........a portable CNC binding drill and edge tuner............talk about idealistic.

 

In your opinion, if you tap wood skis or others without metal topsheets, do you use a 4.1 or the typical 3.5 bit?

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by skier219 View Post

 

 

I tried it both ways on a pair of old test skis, and the larger bit works much better.  I use a 5/32" bit, which works out closer to 4.0mm.

 

being cheap, I only bought 1 bit ( the 4.1) and I've used them for all my skis--metal or non-metal.  It seems to have worked well.  I took my non-metal skis out and gave them the workthrough--no problems so far.

post #34 of 44
Thread Starter 

5/32nds is what I used last time.

 

The railflex plates being off 1mm isnt' a big deal.

I dont think its realy a big deal for any skier.
Unless its 1mm at the back and 1mm the other way on the front. That might cause some issues, but i dont think it would be that much.

I think for 99% of the skiers here, 1mm is good room for error

post #35 of 44

I also use 4.1mm for both metal and non-metal ski cores - and I've never had a problem.

 

Be careful about glues, sealants, whatever, that you're using in the holes of your skis.  You never know what other materials may be in your core and what will react with what.  It's a safer bet to stick to the real deal binding glue (from Holmenkol, SVST, etc.) and only use that.  I've also found that real binding glue makes binding removal later on much easier and less stressful on the core.  Using epoxy, gorilla glue, wood glue, etc. is risking your core IMO.

post #36 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by mrzinwin View Post

 

 

For me, it's entirely a feel thing.  Basically, there's a point at which the ski is "telling me to stop" and I stop.  But the screws are snug--no question about that.  

 

A good experiment you can do, is to torque the screws until they are snug.  Then, wait a while.  Then unscrew them.  If it's too easy to unscrew, then you should torque them more.  But basically, I torque them until the screw serious starts to resist my torquing--and then I stop.

 

So far, I've only mounted tyrolia railflex plates, so I dunno if it's the same for regular bindings.  But I think it should be.  I don't worry about the binding being flat to the ski.  Once all the screws are torqued, the binding is always flat.  My problem is that the binding isn't always centered perfectly.  That's why I will purposely screw in one screw completely tightly before all others--so I can get the binding perfectly centered on the ski.  I am usually still off by half a mm or so, but it's not really significant.

 

I do it a little differently -- get all the screws started and work them in little by little to center the unit as a whole.  Haven't really noticed any major misalignment issues.  I am estimating I can do ~ 0.5mm or better tolerance with the paper templates, a sharp hole punch, and careful centering of the drill bit.

 

RF plates are pretty much the same routine, except they give you much better access to the screws -- no finagling the screwdriver around the heel piece lever or brake pad for instance, like on traditional bindings.  Some heel pieces can be a hassle to work around.  RF plates are also a bit forgiving of fore/aft position because two of the screws on each plate go through standoff bushings that the plate is allowed to slide around.  

 

I have about the same routine for tightening, I think it's like using the force.  You know when you know.

post #37 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by Noodler View Post

 

I also use 4.1mm for both metal and non-metal ski cores - and I've never had a problem.

 

Be careful about glues, sealants, whatever, that you're using in the holes of your skis.  You never know what other materials may be in your core and what will react with what.  It's a safer bet to stick to the real deal binding glue (from Holmenkol, SVST, etc.) and only use that.  I've also found that real binding glue makes binding removal later on much easier and less stressful on the core.  Using epoxy, gorilla glue, wood glue, etc. is risking your core IMO.

 

Agree about some of those glues being bad if they bond the screw in and you later want to get it out -- it can trash up the core and topsheet in that area as you try to back the "glue plug" out.  I've had good luck with plain white glue (Elmers) or waterproof wood glue.

 

You can heat the tip of an expoxied screw with a soldering iron to break the bond if you absolutely have to take it out.  That should work, but no guarantees. 

post #38 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by skier219 View Post

 

 

Agree about some of those glues being bad if they bond the screw in and you later want to get it out -- it can trash up the core and topsheet in that area as you try to back the "glue plug" out.  I've had good luck with plain white glue (Elmers) or waterproof wood glue.

 

 

The moisture-cure polyurethanes like Gorilla Glue and purple-label Titebond  tend to play the 'expand like foamed insulation'  trick no matter what the core material is.      They are also rather crispy-rigid when cured.

 

This combination is not such much goodness for ski.

post #39 of 44

I have seen gorilla glue used in woodworking, and you have to shave the expanded foam away afterwards.  Definitely don't want to see that stuff oozing out around a binding!  It's going to blow!  

post #40 of 44
Thread Starter 

I cannot stand gorilla Glue.

post #41 of 44

(Slow-set epoxy, JB weld, Gorilla Glue, 2-part epoxy, Plumbers caulk, Silicone, blah, blah, blah.......)

PLEASE STOP trying to find the new "ultimate glue" for binding screws! Use wood glue... that's all you will ever need! It's the screws THREADS that hold the screw in - NOT the glue!

post #42 of 44
Thread Starter 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by DropCliffsNotBombs View Post

 

(Slow-set epoxy, JB weld, Gorilla Glue, 2-part epoxy, Plumbers caulk, Silicone, blah, blah, blah.......)

PLEASE STOP trying to find the new "ultimate glue" for binding screws! Use wood glue... that's all you will ever need! It's the screws THREADS that hold the screw in - NOT the glue!

 

Wood glue is water saluable.

post #43 of 44


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Talyn View Post

 

 

 

Wood glue is water saluable.


 


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by DropCliffsNotBombs View Post

 

(Slow-set epoxy, JB weld, Gorilla Glue, 2-part epoxy, Plumbers caulk, Silicone, blah, blah, blah.......)

PLEASE STOP trying to find the new "ultimate glue" for binding screws! Use wood glue... that's all you will ever need! It's the screws THREADS that hold the screw in - NOT the glue!


We were actually talking about those for plugging old holes.

post #44 of 44

Anyone used a water-based melamine for magnesium topsheets?

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