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Dynatar 8000 Legend

post #1 of 14
Thread Starter 

Hi everyone,

I am avery strong intermediate to an aspiring advanced skier*(will and can ski all the mountain , but will not burn the glades and the bumps)

I ski in Quebec on a small hill ( no snow making) about 600 ft vertical .The trails are tight steep and challenging.

Looking to change my B1s ( 2005-6) have about 80 days

150 lbs , 5 foot 7 inches

Looking at the dynastar 8000 in 165cm

any recommendations

 

Thanks Jimmy

post #2 of 14

 This should be in the gear discussion section. Quick answer is that your B1's are a superb bump and tight space ski with pretty good grip and an unique silky feel. If you really want to go wider for a small hill, think about skis like the iM78, the Blizzard 7.6, or the Dynastar 10/Ltd/11 (all the same ski, different years). These are quick, suitable for your level and size, and can carve nicely on ice. The 8000 is a really nice ski for softer snow and bumps, but the long radius makes it less optimal for small/medium radius turns on hardpack. 

post #3 of 14

Completely different skis- B1 is an intermediate ski at best, which is nice soft and enjoyable, but it will suffer at higher speeds and in more challenging conditions.  Legend 8000 is an expert ski with unusually wide comfort range, i.e. it is vry easy to ski for an expert pair of boards.  I skied mine on the East Coat hardpack and it did prety well, especially for a mid-fat.  If I lived where you are, 8000 will be on my shortlist of skis for an Eastern skier that can be used off-trail and on occasional trip out West.  There are better skis for your particular terrain (Volkl Tigershark or Rossi CX80 come to mind, although I have not tried either of them), but you will be hard-pressed to find a more versatile ski than the L8000.   If you can get a good deal for it, it will be a fun ski to have, and definitely better than your B1.

 

Alex

 

post #4 of 14

I think the 8K's are a nice ski for a strong intermediate to advanced skier looking for a wider "eastern" ski.  No offense to alexzn, but they did not feel quite powerful-enough (i.e., torsionally rigid) for me to consider them an expert ski (and this is coming from a 130lbs skier on the 165cm).  Fortunately that's good news for redriverangler.  While I agree with beyond that it does prefer a longer radius turn, it's willingness to skid/swivel seemed to make up for that in a way that is probably better for an intermediate/advanced skier (especially for a skier that "...will not burn the glades or bumps", which to me means a shorter radius ski isn't needed anyway).  OTOH this tendency to skid vs. carve probably doesn't make it the best for eastern hard pack.

 

Therefore you might want something with better edge grip and/or more of that "carving" feel than that of the 8K's (and even the B1's which didn't impress me).  These would include those mentioned by beyond above, the Watea 78's, Nordica Nitrous, or one of the Salomon X-wings.  The real answer for you redriverangler is to, if at all possible, demo the 8K's with a few other skis - this is the only way for you know which might work best.

 

Good luck!

post #5 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by ski-ra View Post

  No offense to alexzn, but they did not feel quite powerful-enough (i.e., torsionally rigid) for me to consider them an expert ski (and this is coming from a 130lbs skier on the 165cm).  

Well, I am a wimp, so usually I like my skis nice and easy.  My feeling is that L8k carves pretty well, and that includes eastern hardpack.  The only place where it does not feel at home is frozen chop where they are just too light and too turny.  I have not noticed much tendency to skid, but again, easy skidding is not necessarily a detrimental, even for an expert set of boards.   If you want stability in frozen stuff, I'd get something like a Tigershark, or a MR (but that's really a Western ski).       

post #6 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by alexzn View Post

 

Completely different skis- B1 is an intermediate ski at best, which is nice soft and enjoyable, but it will suffer at higher speeds and in more challenging conditions.  Legend 8000 is an expert ski with unusually wide comfort range, i.e. it is vry easy to ski for an expert pair of boards. 

 

I think you missed OP's date on the B1's. His year was the last of the wood core versions, quite suitable for advanced and up, quite good in the east (at least mine were), and beloved by bumps skiers (suggest a search here or go check out old reviews at online sites). You're thinking of the more recent B1, which was foam core, cheaper, and yes, definitely an intermediate ski. Also disagree with your characterization of the 8000 as an "expert" ski; a lot of intermediates use them happily because the ski is so forgiving, especially the more recent iterations with a wider shovel and slightly softer flex (again, suggest a search). They're a very popular rental ski out west. Not usually the hallmark of an expert ski, although certainly can be enjoyed by excellent skiers because of its versatility and solid construction.

 

My main point was that he already has a nice ski, don't think going 9 mm wider to similar construction will make that big a difference. In fact if the 8000 has a weakness, it's grip on ice. And the comparatively long turn radius is not great for smaller eastern slopes. So he may be actually losing performance.

post #7 of 14

I'm 5'6" running around 175lb, a L7 (advanced but not expert) skier. I replaced my B1 (~162cm) with a L8K (~166cm) and am extremely happy with that decision. I felt that the B1s were too chattery on steeps at speed. And, it was too light for heavy snow in cruds, trees and bumps. It didn't give the stability to make skiing fun in less than perfect condition.

 

The only weeknesses of the 8k are on blue ice, deep untracked and hard frozen crud/crust, where a heavier and stiffer all mountain or even carver would suit better. Otherwise, it's very agile and relatively quick (even Nastar worthy even though I'm not) on everything else. It slices through light and heavy crud like it's not even there as long as I'm on top of the game. It's great in bumps and trees as long as they are not frozen solid or heavily crusted. It also turns on a dime in either small (relatively) or large radius.

 

With that being said, some may recommend for you to go one size longer at 172cm. That will give you more float when float is needed.

post #8 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by chanwmr View Post

 

I'm 5'6" running around 175lb, a L7 (advanced but not expert) skier. I replaced my B1 (~162cm) with a L8K (~166cm) and am extremely happy with that decision....

 

...With that being said, some may recommend for you to go one size longer at 172cm. That will give you more float when float is needed.

Yeah - I'm 130lbs. and the 165cm 8K's felt a tad short.  It just goes to show that length is very much a matter of personal taste (with some "where/how you ski" and technical capabilities thrown in).  Without knowing much else, the 172cm would be my recommendation for the OP.
 

post #9 of 14

I am a level 8/9 skier, 150lbs, 5'8".  Last year I picked up a pair of 8000s (165 cm) to supplement my Fischer RX8s.  The Fishers are great on the typical eastern conditions.but not much fun in powder over about 6 inches or softer snow conditions.  I have skied the 8000s now both in Vermont and in Colorado and find them to be a excellent preforming versatile western ski - good on the groomed, in crud and powder, and in the bumps.  However on the firm conditions of Vermont, they are no match for the RX8s.  For a western skier, the 8000 is a great choice.  For an eastern skier, there are better ones.

post #10 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by beyond View Post

 

I think you missed OP's date on the B1's. His year was the last of the wood core versions, quite suitable for advanced and up, quite good in the east (at least mine were), and beloved by bumps skiers (suggest a search here or go check out old reviews at online sites). You're thinking of the more recent B1, which was foam core, cheaper, and yes, definitely an intermediate ski. Also disagree with your characterization of the 8000 as an "expert" ski; a lot of intermediates use them happily because the ski is so forgiving, especially the more recent iterations with a wider shovel and slightly softer flex (again, suggest a search). They're a very popular rental ski out west. Not usually the hallmark of an expert ski, although certainly can be enjoyed by excellent skiers because of its versatility and solid construction.

 

My main point was that he already has a nice ski, don't think going 9 mm wider to similar construction will make that big a difference. In fact if the 8000 has a weakness, it's grip on ice. And the comparatively long turn radius is not great for smaller eastern slopes. So he may be actually losing performance.

 

I was thinking of the foam core B1, you are right.  Also, my L8K's are one of the first versions, so again, I may not be current.  However, I stand by my classification of the "old" L8K as a lighter, nimble, expert-level ski. Its popularity as a rental may speak about it being unusually approachable, but I don't think it is a disadvantage right off the bat.  An expert ski does not have to be stiff, unforgiving and respond only to a race-level input. So I classify the L8000 as an expert ski for "mere mortals", as long as it is not taken into frozen crud.   In all other snow it is very quick, quite "danceable", and has a very large sweet spot.

 I never found turn radius lacking FWIIW.  The OP can probably find a better ski for the eastern conditions (TS comes to mind immediately), but that would also involve a different set of compromises.  

post #11 of 14

I just did a review on these...

 

I think its a really nice ski for most conditions you will find at any ski area just about anywhere. Its not going to be an ice skate. Its not going to slarve and land big air in deep powder. Its not going to power through some frozen washboard coralreef with out a second thought.... But if you see those sorts of extremes in ski conditions you really ought to have some specialized skis in your quiver.

 

Every mountain is different. Not every eastern slope is rock hard all the time. Skiing near DC all those years there were certainly days where you NEEDED a race ski with pristine tuned edges. But on the vast majority of days a mid-fat like the 8K would cover you.

 

I think at 150 you should go with at least something in the 170cm range..but demo for size and just go with what works.

post #12 of 14


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by tromano View Post

 

Every mountain is different. Not every eastern slope is rock hard all the time. Skiing near DC all those years there were certainly days where you NEEDED a race ski with pristine tuned edges. But on the vast majority of days a mid-fat like the 8K would cover you.

I find that to be very true as well. There are quite a few days when I wish I have my carver out (like this past Friday) but for the most part an able ski like the L8K will be all you'll need to have a great time in the East.

post #13 of 14
Thread Starter 

Thanks guys for the input ,

I picked up the 8000s just before my trip to Park City and torn up my knee in the MUSH  at Deer Valley by the end of my first day skiing . It was the most expensive half day skiing of my life. Had an MRI  today , gonnna get the results soon. What a way to break in a new pair. What are you gonna do? 

post #14 of 14

Oh no!!! Really sorry to hear that. Hope everything is ok and you can be back on the slopes soon.

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