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Burr buster

post #1 of 22
Thread Starter 

Has anyone had an experience with using the burrbuster tool (http://www.burrbuster.com/index.htm)? Aside from the cheesy marketing on the site, it looks like a good idea if you ski in places where snow coverage a little on the thin side.

post #2 of 22

No experience with the tool.

 

I do find the implication that a side edge burr is not the same as a base edge burr rather interesting.

post #3 of 22

I definitely see why the tools would be designed differently for base vs. side edges.

 

Carbide blades?  I don't know what I think of this.  I like using coarse, medium and fine diamonds for deburring.  Might this replace the coarse, for a quick job?

post #4 of 22
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by SkiMangoJazz View Post

 

I definitely see why the tools would be designed differently for base vs. side edges.

 

Carbide blades?  I don't know what I think of this.  I like using coarse, medium and fine diamonds for deburring.  Might this replace the coarse, for a quick job?

 

I think that is the idea, for case hardened burrs from rock impacts rather than spending ages wearing out a coarse file.

 

Skiing in the alps, dealing with this comes with the territory unfortunately :(

post #5 of 22

Seems to me more of a replacement for a coarse diamond then for a file.  A file peels off strips of material and is for more aggressive sharpening, not de-burring.

 

 

post #6 of 22
Thread Starter 

Sorry, yeah my post should have said diamond rather than file!

post #7 of 22

Figured so. Although I would have fallen for it if you told me that on the other side of the pond "file" means "stone."

post #8 of 22

A waste of your $79.00 if you already have tuning gear.

 

Why would you need this thing. A carbide blade really seems overkill to me! do I want that in contact with my edges?

 

The burr created from filing your base edge does not cause the same performance issue as the burr created from filing your side edge. because of the postion of the base edge burr, it just breaks off as soon as you ski because it is sticking out horizontally from your base edge. ( a simple gummi stone run very lightly (no pressure) at a 45 Deg. angle down the edge takes care of this anyway. A hanging burr off the side edge runs vertically down into the snow and creates havoc because the edges won't engage or realease smoothly but instead the hanging burr gets "caught" in the snow!

 

The hanging burr created from filing  the side edge is easily removed by simply running a fine diamond or an Arkansas stone flat down the base edge after tuning (sharpening or even just polishing the side edge.

 

Knicks and burrs form hitting rocks are easily removed with a 100 grit diamond (Particularly Moonflex Black) befroe contined diamond stone polishing or filing. You should never touch the base edge after initial tuning antway except to remove the hanging burr form working on the side edges.

 

Again, a waste of $79.00. But if your a gear whore gizmo/gadget nut?

post #9 of 22

Totally agree with you a-man.  The moonflex black is my go to tool.  black and then blue, and if I'm feeling special that day followed by white.

 

So do you think even that causes a hanging burr?  I only bother with the stone to remove the hanging burr after side edge filing, which I do once in a while.

post #10 of 22

Normally when not filing my edges and just "refreshing' the sharpness.

 

I use this progression

 

1. Red Moonflex (200 Grit) or SVST Red (220X)

2. Yellow Moonflex (400 Grit)

3. White Moonflex  or SVST (blue 600X)

4. True Hardstone to final polish  http://www.race-werks.com/product.php?prod_num=90010000

5. (No pressure 45 degree angle) with Fk-SKS fine Green Gummi

6. Arkansas Stone flat against base with ski in vise up on edge.

7. One more No pressure pass with Green Gummi    http://www.reliableracing.com/detail.cfm?edp=10618940

 

if i am working on GS Sg or DH ski I would continue the Moonflex stone progression to 1000X and the 1500x.
 

 

On slaloms and all mountain skis up to 600x works fine. The True hardstone

is over 600X maybe even 1500, but really polishes the side edge.

 

 

to answer your question, Absolutlely!! Anytime you are working on your side edge even just with diamonds a hanging burr is created, because you are still moving metal around. The burr is a by product of the normal polishing process! 

Do you ever find your skis a bit grabby after polishing when you have not used a file?

post #11 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by Atomicman View Post

Do you ever find your skis a bit grabby after polishing when you have not used a file?

 

 

I haven't noticed, but will de-hang-da-burr from now on after stoning.

 

post #12 of 22

A-man,

 

Can you further define what a burr feels like? I mean to the skier, not the finger...or both, if you have the time...

 

Grabby....?

post #13 of 22

I feels like your skis don't wnat to roll on edge. when theyou are skiing striaght the skis wnat to continue to travel straight. once you get htem on edge they do not wnat to come off edge.

 

the skis have a midn of their own.

 

Have you ever skied a railed ski? this happens when the base is concave and the edges are lowere then the base.

 

The skis are very unpredicatble and feel as though they are fighting your ever movement.

post #14 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by Atomicman View Post

 

I feels like your skis don't wnat to roll on edge. when theyou are skiing striaght the skis wnat to continue to travel straight. once you get htem on edge they do not wnat to come off edge.

 

the skis have a midn of their own.

 

Have you ever skied a railed ski? this happens when the base is concave and the edges are lowere then the base.

 

The skis are very unpredicatble and feel as though they are fighting your ever movement.


 

Thanks...I'll pay attention to these issues. Right now my skis are all in great shape, but with the thin snow cover where I ski, I will focus on the deterioration if/when I ski on rocks, which is a given. 

post #15 of 22

The burr we are discussing is not from hitting obstructions or rocks (which of course is never a good thing) it is a by product of the normal tuning process.

 

Have you ever had you skis tuned by a shop and when you got them back they skied really poorly, and unpredictably?

 

This is caused by not knocking the hanging burr off!

post #16 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by Atomicman View Post

 

The burr we are discussing is not from hitting obstructions or rocks (which of course is never a good thing) it is a by product of the normal tuning process.

 

Have you ever had you skis tuned by a shop and when you got them back they skied really poorly, and unpredictably?

 

This is caused by not knocking the hanging burr off!


 

Gotchya...yes, I've had lousy tunes. Doing it myself now...all I need, (as far as I know), is a couple finer diamonds and a gummi....another order for Alpinord.  Thanks Atomicman. I guess you're nuclear huh? 

post #17 of 22

Question?  Can you detect a hanging burr by touch?  A burrs of this nature microscopic in size?

 

I generally will run a fine stone down the edges just in case, but was wondering if this is wasted effort?

 

Regards,

Doug

 

 

post #18 of 22

The burr is microscopic, but you can feel it(Understand I am only talking about the hanging burr that extends straight down into the snow off the side edge if the ski were base down on the snow)

 

there is no need to run a stone again down the side edge once you are done filing and polishing, but it is absolutley mandatory to run it flat down the base edge and to make sure the stone is in conatact with the base edge but not rolled over the edge at all.

 

you should do this last step with the ski in a vise standing up with the ski standing on edge working the top base edge , base away from you. Stone should extend about 1/3 width of stone above side edge and you use your thumb as a guide along the side wall which is pointing  straight up so your thumb is on top!


Edited by Atomicman - 2/19/2009 at 03:15 am
post #19 of 22

Thanks A-Man,

 

That is exactly what I was thinking. Often times after doing a side edge and running a finger across the ski from the base to the edge I can feel an irregularity.

 

When this occurs I run a ceramic stone, held in a base edge guide, lightly down each edge.

 

Thanks,

Doug

post #20 of 22

I suppose using a base edge guide is being ultra-safe!

 

I have done it so often that I don't need a guide. Plus it means putting the ski back flat in the vise. since this issue is caused by side edge worl it si the last step in the side edge process and the ski is standing on edge in the vise. it is really very easy to just lay a stone flat against the base with the base away from you and with medium pressure keep the stone in conatact with the base edg without dmaaging your newly sharpened edge.

 

As a very final step i then run a fine gummi wiht NO pressure donw the edge at a 45 degree angle.

 

Your edges witll be the envy ofon the hill!

 

By the way I hope you are runinng a 1/3!

post #21 of 22

The other type of burr is where a rock has pushed up a bit of the base edge steel.  The pushed-up part is harder than the original edge steel due to WORK HARDENING.  Either a diamond stone/file or a standard stone will remove this bit that is hard enough to dull a good file.  I recommend using the stone in a guide unless one has a very steady hand.

 

I don't see the need to spend $79 x 2 for these carbide cutters.  I'd like to see how they work, but most of us already have tools that do a fine job at less cost.  If these do as good a job as they say and are truly idiot proof, then they might be the only tools needed for edge work.

post #22 of 22

Softsnow guy is right on! I always use a guide when removing rock burrs, but there is truly no need for when removing a hanging burr. 2  completely different issues and remedies.

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