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post #1 of 7
Thread Starter 

This was taken a bit ago.  It is down Sitka at PCMR, if anyone is familiar.  Tell me what you think.

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uBw2Y9trmgw

 


Edited by therusty - 2/17/2009 at 01:58 pm
post #2 of 7
Quote:
Originally Posted by loki1 View Post

 

This was taken a bit ago.  It is down Sitka at PCMR, if anyone is familiar.  Tell me what you think.

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uBw2Y9trmgw 


 

Cant see your video: The URL contained a malformed video ID.

post #3 of 7
Thread Starter 

just copy and paste the address.  It isn't working as a link but it will as an address.

 

post #4 of 7

Ok, now it works thnaks.

 

Hey loki1, wellcome to epic and thanks for sharing this excellent video clip. Your skiing is great. Nice clean arcs, good rhythm and all in all very pro looking. I like your float and expecially when you fly through the air and land on your new edges and carve straight in. Im not a purist and Im happy to see people ski with different kind of style and technique and wonder where you are from? Are you trying to do something special in the runs or is it just default skiing? You have a very pronounced up-down movement where you extend at transition and compress at apex and lower C. If you are interested in other options check out how to reverse your flexing and extending. Just a thaught since you are a very good skier. Probably with racing background.

post #5 of 7

There, fixed it for ya Loki, There was a space at the end of the link.

 

Powerful turns! Strong edge engagement. Relatively high edge angles. Edge engagement well above the fall line with simultaneous edge change. Noticeable ski bend!

 

To get rid of the vertical pop, you need to do two things:

1) Finish your turns in a more countered position (don't let the hips and shoulders follow the skis all the way as the skis cut across the fall line )

2) Collapse the inside leg to release the edges of the old turn

 

Freeze the video when you are pointing straight down the fall line. Draw a line connecting your two hands together. Draw another line to cover your belt. Draw a third line from one shoulder to the other. They are close to parallel. That's great! But they are all heavily tilted to the inside of the turn. We want to get those lines more level to the snow.

 

Here's an exercise to try: Level Boo

Ditch your poles. Borrow a stick of bamboo (check with racing or patrol). Be careful taking boo up the lift. Carry the boo across your shoulders, hands on the boo outside of shoulder width. Keep the stick level to the snow at all points throughout the turn. This may cause you to automatically fix 1 and 2 above. If so, play with the timing so that the old downhill shoulder lifts "early" (above the fall line) without losing the new inside leg collapse (this sounds counter intuitive, but can be done). But this exercise may be too much, too early. In which case we can do drills to directly develop 1 and 2.

 

post #6 of 7

loki1,

 

Really exciting skiing.  Great movement and flow between turns.  Really nice, and welcome to epic!  Besides for the pop-up movement in transition (which is leading to late edge engagement) and then banking into the turns, what I think would improve your overall skiing, is flexing your ankles more(especially toward the end of the turns) instead of flexing your knees and hip.  This will give you better body position as you enter the turns.

 

RW

post #7 of 7

In addition to what TDK and RW have said:

 

  - Pop extension is not good or neccessary

  - Banking a little bit too much, develop some angulation.

  - perhaps get off your heels at turn completion

 

I will add that you should work on developing a bit more counter (in addition to the angulation).  Part of the reason you are pulling your arms around a bit in the form of upper body rotary is precisely because of the lack of angulation and because of the late edge engagement you are getting due to your pop extension.  If you fix those things, and also focus on skiing into and maintaining a little counter, then you will see improvement which will curtail some of the arm throw-around.  But you may have developed a habit with this arm pull around and will need to conciously slap that habit down.

 

Regarding the pop extension, try to project your upper body diagonally into the turn instead of up to the sky at transition.  And do it less explosively.  You only need to unweight like that if you intend to pivot your skis, which you do not appear to be wanting in these turns.  Even still, its possible to unweight by more aggressive flexing rather than popping up and that is preferable.  But I claim that in these short radius turns, you don't want to unweight so much or even at all perhaps.

 

You do however want to project your hips more forward going into the next turn as you pass through transition.  So as you finish a turn, pull your feet back under you, especially the inside foot.  As you change edges, project your hips diagonally into the new turn, but slowly, not explosively.  Stay forward all the way through the turn.  By forward, I mean hips forward.  That means the ankle will be flexed, you'll feel the shin cuff and outside leg will become long at or before the apex.  

 

At completion, do not fall onto the heels, while flexing as you are, but maintain shin pressure, pull the feet back, especially the inside foot, in preparation for projecting yourself forward/diag into the next turn.

 

Develop angulation and maintain counter.  Try pushing your inside hand forward as you pass through the apex of the turn.  Lead with the inside hip.  Try to keep your hips and shoulders level to the snow instead of banking in.

 

I think for the edge angles you are getting, you can also try to pull your inside foot out of the way by flexing the inside leg as you go through the apex and just below it.  Right now your skis are quite close together, particularly at the apex, where they should be wider for these kinds of edge angles.  Pull your inside ski up out of the way by flexing that leg and tipping it at the same time.  

 

PSIA folks would in general probably advise you to widen up your stance a bit and I would say at this juncture, not a bad idea.

 

You know how to carve the skis which is a major milestone for many people.  We are talking about refinements here that can take you to the next level, enable you to make crazy turns out of the same equipment you never thought possible.

 


Edited by borntoski683 - 2/22/2009 at 01:14 am
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