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MA request (ego checked at door)

post #1 of 11
Thread Starter 

I've not done this before... be gentle.

 

I've been working for some years now to get rid of a residual A-frame in my turns and achieve more parallel skiing.  Most of my skiing happens in the backcountry; however, this little groomer (a blue run on a good day) is readily available and I do laps on it pretty regularly while working on big toe/little toe edges, relative weight between inside/outside skis, "tele" turn ankle flexing, etc.  I haven't had any feedback for a couple of years and so look forward to what you have to say, esp. with regard to additional drills I should be considering, etc.  

 

Hopefully this will be enough vid to be of value to you; if not I can try to get more either on this run or in the BC later this week.

 

 

post #2 of 11

Seeing your ego was left at the door:

 

-  Fairly upright stance, which is good,,,,  but a bit aft  Bring your hips forward. 

 

-  Very inclinated.  Ok for these low edge steery turns, but could limit your ability to go to higher edge angles if/when you decide to pursue carving.  Try to keep your torso and shoulders level as you turn.

 

-  You have a bit of a downstem at the end of your turn.  Downhill foot/ski does a slight downhill stem right at the beginning of your transition.  Usually people do this to create a platform from which to up move or rotate into the new turn.  All I see in you is a very slight push/pivot at the beginning of your turn,,, very minor,,, so my suspicion is the stem is a residual embedded movement from back in your more pivoty/uppity days.  Hestitation transitions will help get rid of it.  ILE's too.  Here's a link to an article on ILE's.  (I'll have an article on hesitation in the near future.)

 

www.YourSkiCoach.com/YourSkiCoach/Inside_Leg_Extension.html

 

- Your steering is very wide track.  In other words, you get your skis quite out of line with your direction of travel and leave a wide skid track in your wake.  This is great for  speed control, but you should be able to narrow track steer too, and leave a very narrow skid track behind you.  Practice controlling speed with turn shape, then try to make as narrow a skid track as possible as you do it. 

 

 

www.YourSkiCoach.com 


 


Edited by Rick - 2/16/2009 at 04:37 am
post #3 of 11
Thread Starter 

Thank you, Rick, appreciate your feedback.

 

Just making sure I understand you:

 

- Inclinated - are you talking about my upper body needing to show more separation from what my lower body is doing?  I think I understand that to be your meaning based on the shoulder/torso comment.  (Sorry to not be better with the language, I've spent very little time in lessons during my ski career - limited to one trip to ESA a few years ago and once-every-few-years half-days previous to that.)

 

- Downstem - I'll look at it in slow-mo, see if I can understand what you're seeing.  I've printed out your article - very much appreciate the video link at the end demonstrating the technique.  That's good stuff and I'll review the vid again before I head up tomorrow.  Good stuff to try (and try and try and try).

 

- Wide track - I'll try narrower turns tomorrow and see what they look like.  I'm a little gun-shy right now, just coming back from an injury, but that slope is perfect for trying stuff. 

 

Thank you again for the insights.  I appreciate your time and comments.

post #4 of 11

You're very welcome, mountaingirl.  Yes, that's what I meant by inclinated.  Sorry for the jargon without explanation.  It just means that you're tipping your whole body as a unit, rather than tipping the legs and keeping the body vertical.  As edge angles grow, and your tipping over further, inclination causes a loss of outside ski balance, and a fall onto the inside ski, or the inside hip onto the snow. 

 

Good luck with working on this stuff.  Let me know if you have any other questions along the way.  I have other, more comprehensive materials available that can help the process along, and take it even further. 

 

www.YourSkiCoach.com

post #5 of 11

Mountain girl, good skiing. Nice round turns and solid close stance. Good balance and good rhythm.

 

Rick gave you some good feedback but I would like for you to focus on your hips for a moment. If you look at your hips you see that they are out over your skis during turning. This is coupled to the inclination Rick mentioned and also the lack of upper/lower body separation you commented on your selfe. What you should do is turn your upper body slightly towards the outside of the turn (1:upper body counter) and also lean in that direction with your upper body (2:angulation) so that your weight would be placed more over your outside ski (outside ski pressure). These two movements should be progressive through out the turn and help you point your butt more uphill insted of pointing it in the direction of your ski tails. They will help you create effective edge angles and give you much better controll when pitch increases. Note that these two movements will not make your skis turn. They are only upper body supportive movements. Im not asking you to bring your hips forwards, bring them sideways and angle them uphill. Disclaimer, upper body counter and angulation are very important movements but they will not turn your skis for you. You will need some way of initiating your turns. Now you are stemming with your outside ski and pushing your hips into rotation. This is the reason you dont have any "up" movement at initiation. No up-unweighting. You are stemming, a refined way of wedging. Not a bad thing but you are trying to hide that movement and in the process you have aquired a bunch of bad habbits such as inclination and hip rotation. Check out Ricks lessons for better options.

 

You need to lean more forwards with your upper body. Your upper body is too upright. Especially with a back pack. Also, just for the heck of it, check out my video clip in the crud thread.

post #6 of 11

:09 seconds...notice how your outside pole is off the snow and the inside one is dragging?  Reverse that.  Drill with the outside pole dragging.  Drill with both poles dragging.  Drill with both poles dragging as you rotate your upper body to bring the inside pole forward and the outside pole back.

 

:10 seconds...feet ahead of the body.  Rick says to bring the hips forward, but it works better for me to think of pulling the feet back.  At each turn transition, pull both feet back, way back.  During each turn, pull the inside foot back all the time every turn.

 

 

post #7 of 11

Hi there MountainGirl,

 

That looks like parallel skiing to me. You're ready to move to the next level.

 

Although there's no visible A frame to speak of, there is evidence of A fight going on. Do you have custom footbeds?

 

Here are some drill suggestions:

 

Shuffle turns: Shuffle your feet back and forth constantly throughout every turn.

 

Power Side Slips: On a medium steep blue trail and groomed snow do side slips with varying edge angles. If 0 is full stop (high edge angle) and 10 is a totally flat ski, do 10-15 foot slides of 3, 6 9 interspersed with a full stop. Try to get a constant speed at each edge angle. Do the #'s randomly at first to get the feel of tipping to create angles, then do them in order ascending and descending to get the feel of progressive edge angle change. (this will help with Rick's narrow track suggestion)

 

Carved fan traverse uphill to a stop: Find a fairly wide trail. Start a traverse at shallow angle across the slope, get some speed going, then tip both of your boots uphill (similar to the power side slip movement). Do not turn your feet at all. The skis should turn you uphill until you stop. This is a one turn to a stop drill. Watch out for traffic! After you come to a stop, check your tracks. Decrease the start angle until you see narrow tracks no more than 2 inches wide. Once you've got it, increase your start angle (and speed!) until you either start straight down the fall line or until you can't make thin tracks any more.

 

Skate turns: Start your turns with the inside ski doing a skate step into the new turn.

 

Hop to shape: Start your turn by hopping off both feet, turn the feet while airborne and then land on your new edges for the new turn. Carve the bottom of the new turn until your skis are pointed slightly uphill and repeat. It helps to land the hops tips first.

 

 

The first drill will help get you centered. The next two will help you use your edges to steer more instead of slow down. The last two will help start letting your body to flow inside the new turns to help pull your skis onto their new edges earlier in the turns.

post #8 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by SoftSnowGuy View Post

 

:09 seconds...notice how your outside pole is off the snow and the inside one is dragging?  Reverse that.  Drill with the outside pole dragging.  Drill with both poles dragging.  Drill with both poles dragging as you rotate your upper body to bring the inside pole forward and the outside pole back.

 

:10 seconds...feet ahead of the body.  Rick says to bring the hips forward, but it works better for me to think of pulling the feet back.  At each turn transition, pull both feet back, way back.  During each turn, pull the inside foot back all the time every turn.

 

 


 

SoftSnowGuy, did you see that above quoted post was your post #1000

post #9 of 11
Thread Starter 
Quote:

Originally Posted by therusty View Post

 

1)  Although there's no visible A frame to speak of, there is evidence of A fight going on. Do you have custom footbeds?

 

Here are some drill suggestions:

 

2)  Shuffle turns: Shuffle your feet back and forth constantly throughout every turn.

 

3)  Power Side Slips: On a medium steep blue trail and groomed snow do side slips with varying edge angles. If 0 is full stop (high edge angle) and 10 is a totally flat ski, do 10-15 foot slides of 3, 6 9 interspersed with a full stop. Try to get a constant speed at each edge angle. Do the #'s randomly at first to get the feel of tipping to create angles, then do them in order ascending and descending to get the feel of progressive edge angle change. (this will help with Rick's narrow track suggestion)

 

4)  Carved fan traverse uphill to a stop: Find a fairly wide trail. Start a traverse at shallow angle across the slope, get some speed going, then tip both of your boots uphill (similar to the power side slip movement). Do not turn your feet at all. The skis should turn you uphill until you stop. This is a one turn to a stop drill. Watch out for traffic! After you come to a stop, check your tracks. Decrease the start angle until you see narrow tracks no more than 2 inches wide. Once you've got it, increase your start angle (and speed!) until you either start straight down the fall line or until you can't make thin tracks any more.

 

4)  Skate turns: Start your turns with the inside ski doing a skate step into the new turn.

 

5)  Hop to shape: Start your turn by hopping off both feet, turn the feet while airborne and then land on your new edges for the new turn. Carve the bottom of the new turn until your skis are pointed slightly uphill and repeat. It helps to land the hops tips first.

 

 

The first drill will help get you centered. The next two will help you use your edges to steer more instead of slow down. The last two will help start letting your body to flow inside the new turns to help pull your skis onto their new edges earlier in the turns.

 

Thank you all so much for your help, you guys!  Hopefully I'll be strong enough for ESA in Big Sky, but this will give me plenty to work on in the meantime.

 

Just so you know, the run where the vid was shot is about the only groomed I have access to regularly.  It's at a little tiny local ski hill - about 700' of vertical (woohoo!)  I love that place, though, best vibe in the world.  Sometimes he'll groom one of the steeper pitches - if he does I'll work some of these exercises there, too.

 

1)  I've had fitted boots/footbeds for years.  I got new boots and footbeds from Bud just before my injury, this video was from my first day on them.  FYI, skis are Legend 8800's 178cm.

 

2)  Shuffle feet back and forth - is that front to back?  Not imagining how side to side would work...

 

3)  I can visualize that.  Will give it a go next time up.

 

4)  Am not visualizing these two.  Do you have vid somewhere?

 

5)  I can visualize this one - it sounds like fun!

 

These and the ILE exercises sound like really great stuff.  And they sound like they'll also result in some of the upper body changes that SoftSnowGuy and tdk6 are discussing.  I've been concentrating on pulling my inside foot back as part of the anti-A-frame battle... it sure doesn't come naturally yet, though.  Will keep working on it.

 

Upright stance - I'll be very interested to see what I look like in the BC skiing with a pack - I think I'd likely go over backwards if I were that upright with weight on my back, but it's hard to know without vid.  I'll hand my partner a camera next time out, maybe Thursday if I'm feeling better.


Edited by mountaingirl1961 - 2/17/2009 at 05:40 pm
post #10 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by mountaingirl1961 View Post

 

...

2)  Shuffle feet back and forth - is that front to back?  Yes. Not imagining how side to side would work... Yikes!

 

...

 

4)  Am not visualizing these two.  Do you have vid somewhere? No. (Hmm - two #4s) Fan traverse: if a normal traverse would leave a straight line track across the trail, the carved traverse would leave a smiley face (without the eyes). The fan part would create a series of smiley faces, each new one with a bigger smile (greater uphill component at the end of the turn). Skate turns are like skating across flat snow (push off one ski, then glide on the other). Finish off a turn on your uphill edges, then do a skate step with your new inside ski to start the next turn. Step onto the new inside edge when you step onto the new inside ski to start the next turn.

post #11 of 11

Hi Sue,

 

Like your skiing, there is a lot of good things going on.  The other posts have a lot of great information for you.  Getting a better overall position over your skis will help you immensely.  More ankle flex is the key there.  Do some skiing on groomers where you lift the tail of the inside ski until you are ready to turn again, the lift the tail of the next inside ski.  Start linking the turns together so you are only using the outside ski on the snow (plus the tip of the inside ski).  Once you get this, leave the inside ski on the snow, but keep the body position the above drill puts you in.  This should help you a lot.

 

RW

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