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Wide Ski's on Groomers - Page 3

post #61 of 87
Quote:
Originally Posted by flatNshallow View Post

 

 

Not at all... My "everyday" skis are BROs (99 waist) and I ski primarily at Caberfae...

 

Why ski a fat ski at a midwest hill? 

 

Primarily because they are what I ski when I go out west - I don't want to waste any time "adjusting"...  to use another posters racing analogy... If I race Baja in a truck but the only track I have to practice on is a paved oval, at least I'm driving my truck...

 

 


 

goblue - if you can't find a good use for fatties at Cab you are not looking hard enough.

 

 

this idealogy is funny.

 

So if a Baja 500 driver want to get quicker/better at driving the baja 500, but was going to practice on a road course you think that driver would use his truck? I wouldnt think so.

 

 

post #62 of 87
Quote:
Originally Posted by BushwackerinPA View Post

 

 

 

this idealogy is funny.

 

So if a Baja 500 driver want to get quicker/better at driving the baja 500, but was going to practice on a road course you think that driver would use his truck? I wouldnt think so.

 

 

 

What would he be doing on a road course anyway? That's like skiing ice.

 

 

post #63 of 87
Quote:
Originally Posted by flatNshallow View Post


 

goblue - if you can't find a good use for fatties at Cab you are not looking hard enough.

 

Or it means that the South Peak is closed.

 

Good chance I'll be there on Sunday - whether I'll break out the 94mm waisted skis, or use my usual 74mm waist depends on the conditions.  Heck, I may even use the 65mm boards.

 

 

post #64 of 87
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Walt View Post

 

 

Or it means that the South Peak is closed.

 

Good chance I'll be there on Sunday - whether I'll break out the 94mm waisted skis, or use my usual 74mm waist depends on the conditions.  Heck, I may even use the 65mm boards.

 

 

 

The ammount of people there on weekdays can piss me off, i duno how you can manage to go on the weekends at all!!!!!

No skiing for me tonight though. 
10 dollars only covers 4 hours of tubing, no lift passes. =\

I put on my boots and ski's though. i can bend my knees and put the ski's on edge just fine.
Just impacts are kinda tough still, knee is moving around a bit.

I found out today that my normal everyday boots also clip into my bindings as tight as my boots.
to bad I couldn't ski with them like that.

Maybe cross country.

post #65 of 87
Quote:
Originally Posted by noofus View Post

 

My 78mm skis have a 13.5M radius....they carve like crazy...


 

What do you have?

post #66 of 87

Bushwpa,

Did you say somewhere that you prefer cambered wide skis?

post #67 of 87

If your not going to be skiing really deep snow, whats the point. Stay with a 50/50 ski 78 to 88.

post #68 of 87
Quote:
Originally Posted by nwski View Post

 

If your not going to be skiing really deep snow, whats the point. Stay with a 50/50 ski 78 to 88.

 

so why do guys who ski extreme comps ski on 100mm or wider skis even when it hasnt snow in awhile?

 

those guys are looking for the best performance in those conditions, you would think they would take the above advice right?

 

 

or maybe your wrong...

post #69 of 87

There's extreme comps on groomers?

Wouldn't the answer be for the drops?  or the speed.

It ain't about the nice turns!

post #70 of 87

I would actually advise Talyn to go ahead and get a RR and bevel the base edge 4* and learn to ski the bases on groomers...

 

Then, get back on your carvers and enjoy your new skill set.

 

I'm an x-racer, x-big mountain competitor, etc etc. Had been skiing for 30 years before getting on a reverse and discovering my bases. I feel like a complete idiot now for waiting for so long. 

 

My first generation Gotamas taught me how to butter a wide, traditionally-shaped ski. I couldn't imagine an easier ski in pow. So, I just kept them... thinking my pow quiver was fine. That was dumb. 

 

My '09 Mavens taught me how to slarve.

 

And now my '06 Jet Fuels (my carving skis) provide a whole new ride because I found my bases. 

 

I'm skiing stronger than ever and I blame it on the Mavens for forcing me to find my bases. I just wish I still raced. My style is fast as hell now. 

post #71 of 87
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by samurai View Post

 

I would actually advise Talyn to go ahead and get a RR and bevel the base edge 4* and learn to ski the bases on groomers...

 

Then, get back on your carvers and enjoy your new skill set.

 

I'm an x-racer, x-big mountain competitor, etc etc. Had been skiing for 30 years before getting on a reverse and discovering my bases. I feel like a complete idiot now for waiting for so long. 

 

My first generation Gotamas taught me how to butter a wide, traditionally-shaped ski. I couldn't imagine an easier ski in pow. So, I just kept them... thinking my pow quiver was fine. That was dumb. 

 

My '09 Mavens taught me how to slarve.

 

And now my '06 Jet Fuels (my carving skis) provide a whole new ride because I found my bases. 

 

I'm skiing stronger than ever and I blame it on the Mavens for forcing me to find my bases. I just wish I still raced. My style is fast as hell now. 

 

That was my thought Samurai. However, I might not have a high enough skill set to make that transfer to wide bases yet. Maybe next year I can in the middle of the season.

For now, I just have to worry about boarders hitting me and screwing up my knee again.

post #72 of 87

I can remember someone posting a video of a guy carving skis of different widths? Im not sure if that was on this site though? Ive been looking for it

post #73 of 87
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by jameselston View Post

 

I can remember someone posting a video of a guy carving skis of different widths? Im not sure if that was on this site though? Ive been looking for it

 

if you have some issues, i guess that could be a fix.
Some sort lf handycap. like they do for soles of shoes, build up one side.

post #74 of 87

I do not think the issue is so much the width (within reason).  I was on both my 160 cm Volkl Allstars (width unknown but a turn radius or about 13 m) and my 183 cm Gotamas (waist 110 or 115 and TR of about 30 m).  Had a good time on both.  Of course my Allstars got about 10-12 carved turns and my Goats about 6 carved turns down the same hill. Technique was much the same for either ski.

 

The issue is more the rocker and reverse sidecut.  That opens up a whole new experience and technique. Not really built for midwest snow, but if you find some cheap (or if money is no object for you) buy some just for kicks.

post #75 of 87

I skied yesterday on perfect corduroy on a pair of skis which are 84 mm, 18m radius, and thought they were carving great.  Then I switched to a pair of cheater GS skis, 65mm under the foot with a 17m radius and realized just how boring the fatter skis were.  The fatter skis are better in the crud, but for laying over big angle carved turns the narrow skis are just more fun.

post #76 of 87
Thread Starter 

my skiing went to crap with the bad knee. I can't even make decent turns now, let alone carve.

post #77 of 87

 Patience grasshopper. 

post #78 of 87
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Trekchick View Post

 

 Patience grasshopper. 

 

Backpeddling sucks!

post #79 of 87
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Trekchick View Post

 

 Patience grasshopper. 

 

Backpeddling sucks!

post #80 of 87
Quote:
Originally Posted by flatNshallow View Post

My "everyday" skis are BROs (99 waist) and I ski primarily at Caberfae...

 

Why ski a fat ski at a midwest hill? 

 

Primarily because they are what I ski when I go out west - I don't want to waste any time "adjusting"...

 

I had my Mantras out at Mt Holly yesterday, prepping for a trip to Tahoe.  It doesn't take much more than a couple of runs to adjust to the wider boards, so I don't see the point in using inappropriate gear all the time.

 

Quote:

Originally Posted by newfydog View Post

 

I skied yesterday on perfect corduroy on a pair of skis which are 84 mm, 18m radius, and thought they were carving great.  Then I switched to a pair of cheater GS skis, 65mm under the foot with a 17m radius and realized just how boring the fatter skis were.  The fatter skis are better in the crud, but for laying over big angle carved turns the narrow skis are just more fun.

 

Bingo.  A ski designed to carve the cord will be much better at carving the cord than one that's designed for something else.  The Mantras are a great ski, but not something I'd want to use as an everyday ski in the midwest.

post #81 of 87
Hmm, I don't find wider (80-90 mm) skis 'harder' to ski on groomed terrain (unless it's ice, and not always then either). On the contrary I find many of them more forgiving than a race derived ski. 65-70 mm skis def. have more performance on hard surfaces, but not necessarily easier to carve.
Edited by Karlsson - 3/31/16 at 9:57am
post #82 of 87

A 66mm waist tends to bog down in the soft. I go to a 95mm-105mm waist for that. A little more surfy.

post #83 of 87

It's...IT'S ALIVE!

 

Way to bring back a 7 year old thread.  Lots has changed over the last 7 years, so yes, there are a good number of @90mm under foot skis that will really carve quite nicely on groomed terrain.  Yes, you give away some edge to edge quickness and short-turning ability vs. an front-side oriented carver, and you don't get the same float as a @105mm powder board.  From a quick scan, the OP was looking, 7 years ago, to add a powder board to ski the groomers at his local hill.  The answer, to me, is still the same: No, why would you want to? It's not likely to increase your skills, nor is it going to be a lot of fun.

post #84 of 87

K2 184 Pinnacles 118 (Seth) mounted @ 0 and K2 189 Pettitors 120 (Sean) mounted @ ~+3 to +3 1/2, (for lighter to mid weight skiers at least), are truly fun on Western groomers - no compromise, as long as your legs/knees are conditioned to fat skis already.   These are the only two really fat skis I know of or have been on that are "no compromise" in this way.  The stability of tanks, with turning grooves that are smooth and inspiring, and pretty much no speed limit, for both skis. :duck: 

 

For corroboration, you shoulda seen Christy Sports Bowmar store manager Bailey sg skiing the groomers at A Basin during the first and last few weeks of last season on his Pinnacle/Annex 118s! 

post #85 of 87
Going for the record. Maybe the oldest thread that has been CPR:d?
And agreed! Modern wider skis are mostly easier to ski -- also on groomers. Race skis are much more challenging and unforgiving and less fun for most skiers.
post #86 of 87

Yeah, watch out "Tyranny of Fat Skis" thread!

 

(P.S.  I spent more than forty years skiing gs race skis as my daily drivers.   They're fun too!      Maybe just as fun, just different!)

post #87 of 87
I wrote 'for most'. You are probably a technically very good skier. Most are not.
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