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Want to move up to next level but can't - Page 2

post #31 of 54


 

Originally Posted by matildah View Post

 

It's funny that you talk about the gear, because I've been wondering the same thing. I bought my skis and boots a couple of years ago at skidazzle. Being a newbie, I really was relying on the reccommendation of the salesman and the little bit of research I did. I'm still not sure if I have the right skis, but I know I'm in need of new boots. They have been painful since day one. So, for now, I'm looking for some new boots and maybe next season see about the skis.  Thanks for your input. I really appreciate it.
 


 

matildah, been following your thread and the encouraging comments from everyone are right on.  I read your post about your gear today.  Boots that fit you exceptionally well are a major key to good skiing.  Especially as a mature skier.  In so many ways, and for many reasons, they are your best safety gear and key to a quality ski day with tons of fun.   

 

Next time you are in Tahoe, I encourage you to plan ahead & schedule a boot buying/fitting appointment with one of the outstanding Epic Bootfitters here on Epicski. It will make more difference in your skiing than you could possibly imagine.  Boots can be pain free, fit like a glove, and help your skiing.
 

post #32 of 54
Thread Starter 

Ahhhh that's too bad, I was just in Tahoe last month. Wish I had known what I've learned from this thread.  Hopefully I'll be back next year. I was just out looking for boots and realized that the local sporting goods do not have the most knowledgable employees. Luckily I did not let him talk me into buying anything. Thanks for your help.

Originally Posted by 911over View Post

 


 

matildah, been following your thread and the encouraging comments from everyone are right on.  I read your post about your gear today.  Boots that fit you exceptionally well are a major key to good skiing.  Especially as a mature skier.  In so many ways, and for many reasons, they are your best safety gear and key to a quality ski day with tons of fun.   

 

Next time you are in Tahoe, I encourage you to plan ahead & schedule a boot buying/fitting appointment with one of the outstanding Epic Bootfitters here on Epicski. It will make more difference in your skiing than you could possibly imagine.  Boots can be pain free, fit like a glove, and help your skiing.
 


 

post #33 of 54

I echo everyone else recommendation - if the boots are painful they are not right for you.

I skiied with bad boots like you for 1 season - the shop tried everything included re-shaping the shell. Its still painful in the end. At the very last try, they made it "big enough" that my feet actually can fit (ok, swims a it) inside the boot and was able to, for the 1st time, feel the skis. What a difference! Even the instructor asked after 30 sec of skiing what did I do.

 

So, a long way to say, find a good bootfitter if you can. You'll enjoy skiing much much more after that.

post #34 of 54

Mathildah,

    I will also echo recommendation re: excellent bootfitter and the right boots --- the difference it can make will amaze you!  There are some excellent bootfitters listed on Epic as 911Over mentions!  Best of luck! 

post #35 of 54

Interesting. I will definietly echo the excellent advice you've been given. By coinicidence, an editor just assigned me a story on this. In writing this, I wrote about what worked for me, and what worked for others.

 

Enjoy

post #36 of 54

Great article LM! 

post #37 of 54

Matilda,  as stated by many, we can certainly emphathize with your ski status.

 

1.  In the Yikes Zone, I have a copy and will loan to you.  PM me if you want a loaner.

 

2.  Try skiing more than 1 day at a time.  try to put 3 days back to back and you will find; comfort, confidence and ability increase every day.  It is hard to progress if you ski as seldom as you stated. Lessons are good but time on the snow is primary.

 

3.  There are a lot of good tips and suggestions in the Begineers Zone.  When you have time go through that forum and read as much as possible. 

post #38 of 54

Matildah, I've really appreciated this thread. I think that you reflect the situation of a lot of skiers (especially women). I really admire your determination and hope that your love of the sport will carry you through any doubts and hesitations.

 

Without seeing you ski, of course, it's hard to know just what holds you back. Fear is certainly an issue because it makes us do things that we know we shouldn't -- particularly, we lean back and away from the fall line, and we tense our muscles when we need them to be at their most open and receptive to deal with the shocks of the terrain. So too is not having the right boots: you won't drive your skis if you are lifting out of your boots and you won't appreciate being held in your boots unless they are a good fit.

 

But I also wonder if there may not be a technical issue. I just found this video on YouTube and I thought that it was very helpful. If you look at some of the skiers, they look like half the skiers you see on most hills (well, maybe eighty percent on some!). Sure, they can get down (most) slopes but, IMHO, they'll never be really comfortable on skis until they address those issues. Have a look at the skiers. If you see yourself in any of the ones that they criticize, you have something to work on.

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jWVPlyhldsk&NR=1#

post #39 of 54

ski more. your profile says you ski 5-8 days a year. it takes me a few days just to get back to the point i left off the previous season. books, videos, and instruction are great, but they are no substitute for time and miles. and properly fitting boots will make those miles more like fun and less like torture.

post #40 of 54

Hi Matilda!

 

Firstly, you're definately not too old!  I too am 45 and out of the loop for 20 yearsuntil last season.  I thought skiing would be a good way to bond with my 13 year old son.  BOy was I right!  After a weekend mini ski trip to the Pocono Mountains of PA ( Shanee Mtn to be exact), there was no looking back.  After the first day of taking a two hr lesson and practicing teqnique on the bunny slope, we were off and skiing on greens for the rest of the day! Mind you, we were skiing, but not gracefully, but better than expected. It takes time Matilda, especially if you only go 2-3 times each season.  What I suggest is to try and go as often as possible  ( we go every Saturday) and take a few more lessons.  In order to master increasingly difficult terrain, you need confidence, and the only way to get this is by skiing as often as possible.  ALso invest in good gear if you haven't already done so.  We've been renting gear from a local outfitter for the past two seasons and I demoed a few pairs 3 weeks ago and I'll tell you what a difference!   Additionally, try to do cardio, lower leg and core training if possible. The better shape you're in , the less effort skiing will be and the more fun you'll have!

 

Good luck!

 

post #41 of 54


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by SoftSnowGuy View Post

 

Ah, the skier's paradox.  You must be very aggressive to have the control to ski as slowly as you want.  If you're in defensive positions ( weight back on your heels, weight on the uphill ski) nothing works right and your skis run out from under you.

 

As always, you need to balance over your outside ski (usually the downhill ski, always the outside ski).

 

When things go right, think back about exactly what you did right.  Make a mental checklist for yourself of the basics...weight on the center of your feet and pressing against the boot tongues, weight over the outside ski & light on the inside ski, hips & shoulders facing the outside ski, hands a bit forward & out to the sides in a natural balancing position, etc.  Put these in numerical order for which are most important for you.  When things don't go right, stop, go back to your number one on your list, and get each thing right, one at a time.

 

We borrowed The Yikes! Zone through an interlibrary loan from our local public library.  Worth reading!--get it.  One basic to remember...try new things on familiar terrain, and ski new terrain with familiar skills.  Do not try new skills on new terrain.


 

post #42 of 54

For those interested in a middle aged skiiers progression, i put on skis first time in Jan-Feb08(45+yrs), and this thread shows you my progression from April 08 to Mar 15, 09 (46+yrs)...

 www.epicski.com/forum/thread/82473/movement-analysis-requested#post_1079284

 

still a long way to go but working on it with lessons and advice from anyone, no embarassment, nothing, goal is to be able to carve with the best of them and also ski powder (harder on the knees, easier on the mind than hardpack)

 

good luck, this thread was very enjoyable reading about so many good skiiers who started late, motivating and inspiring.

skiing is good for the soul

post #43 of 54

Matildah,

 

You have gotten some great advice here.  I really appreciate Bob Barnes's perspective and attitude and think that he is right on.  Celebrate what you have accomplished so far and be happy with where you are in the journey.  You on the right path and can certainly ski things now that you could not have in the recent past.  Keep striving for improvement by seeking instruction from those who ski the way you want to.  Be gentle on yourself in the process and enjoy each moment on the mtn. 

 

I was away from the sport for a long time before coming back and realizing that I needed a lot of help.  I sought out instruction and almost completely re-learned my technique and it has been transformational.  It gave me the tools to keep working on things on my own,.  You can definitely do the same. 

 

Always remember, any great skier you see out there was, at one point, a plodding beginner who was very uncomfortable on skis.  No one is born a great skier...its a combination of desire, work and learning from others.  You WILL get there and you WILL reach your goals on skis...it will just take some time.  If you want to compress the learning curve you must ski more days each season.  Think in terms of days on the mountain rather than seasons on skis.  Getting up over 10 days a seasons is great start...20 would be awesome.  Beginning to develop the right muscle memory will ensure that good habits stick with you year over year. 

 

Best of luck on this wonderful journey.

 

Cheers

post #44 of 54
Thread Starter 

Thanks, That was a very helpful article.
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Lisamarie View Post

 

Interesting. I will definietly echo the excellent advice you've been given. By coinicidence, an editor just assigned me a story on this. In writing this, I wrote about what worked for me, and what worked for others.

 

Enjoy


 

post #45 of 54
Thread Starter 

That was really interesting. It makes me want to have someone film me while skiing to see how I ski. I bet I lean back like the ones in the video.  Very informative.  Thank you for that.
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by hitherandthither View Post

 

Matildah, I've really appreciated this thread. I think that you reflect the situation of a lot of skiers (especially women). I really admire your determination and hope that your love of the sport will carry you through any doubts and hesitations.

 

Without seeing you ski, of course, it's hard to know just what holds you back. Fear is certainly an issue because it makes us do things that we know we shouldn't -- particularly, we lean back and away from the fall line, and we tense our muscles when we need them to be at their most open and receptive to deal with the shocks of the terrain. So too is not having the right boots: you won't drive your skis if you are lifting out of your boots and you won't appreciate being held in your boots unless they are a good fit.

 

But I also wonder if there may not be a technical issue. I just found this video on YouTube and I thought that it was very helpful. If you look at some of the skiers, they look like half the skiers you see on most hills (well, maybe eighty percent on some!). Sure, they can get down (most) slopes but, IMHO, they'll never be really comfortable on skis until they address those issues. Have a look at the skiers. If you see yourself in any of the ones that they criticize, you have something to work on.

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jWVPlyhldsk&NR=1#


 

post #46 of 54
Thread Starter 

I do need to get out there more. Tell my husband that! We've been averaging 3 trips a year and maybe a night skiing here or there, but I want more! We need to move closer to the snow! We are planning one last trip to Mammoth before the season ends, so that's when I can try out all the things I learned on this thread. Before next season....NEW BOOTS!

Quote:
 

Originally Posted by epl View Post

 

ski more. your profile says you ski 5-8 days a year. it takes me a few days just to get back to the point i left off the previous season. books, videos, and instruction are great, but they are no substitute for time and miles. and properly fitting boots will make those miles more like fun and less like torture.


 

post #47 of 54

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by matildah View Post

 

That was really interesting. It makes me want to have someone film me while skiing to see how I ski. I bet I lean back like the ones in the video.  Very informative.  Thank you for that.
 


 

 

You're very, very welcome -- keep us posted!

post #48 of 54

Hi Matildah,

 

I feel your pain!  I too started to ski mid-life and struggle for those break-through days.  Recently I received a copy of Building Blocks, done by this website's own Rick.  All I can say is, I wish I had these DVDs years ago!  His website is www.YourSkiCoach.com  and he's a frequent contributor here on Epic.  The explanations of the drills are very clear and logical, and the photography and the demonstrations of the drills are exceptional.  I too have taken lessons and gone to camps but have a hard time remembering the few bits of info that were really helpful.  With these DVDs you can go back and review them 'til your heart's content.

 

Good luck with your skiing and just keep having fun!

post #49 of 54

I don't think you can under estimate the benefit of a good women's ski clinic.  Either a weekly type at a local hill, or a several day clinic planned to coincide with one of your vacations.  Taking lessons and skiing with all women instructors and students did wonders for my wife's skiing.  It sounds like you have the basic skills and desire to take a big step in improvement, and that your biggest impediment at this point may just be your mind set.  Reading about techniques is helpful, but there is nothing like skiing with other ladies like yourself to get you to make improvement leaps without even trying.

post #50 of 54

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by mudfoot View Post

 

I don't think you can under estimate the benefit of a good women's ski clinic... Reading about techniques is helpful, but there is nothing like skiing with other ladies like yourself to get you to make improvement leaps without even trying.

 

On April 6th and 7th, my better half, Uncle Louie and another well-known ski coach, is offering to work with intermediate lady skiers to help us make that next break-through in our skills.  This is my first real all-women clinic-type of event, and even though I'm not gung-ho on group skiing, I'm very much looking forward to this event.  It's called CubeFest, and you can look for it under the "Let's Go" Forum.    There is only one more opening for this FREE event, so if you can make it, PM Uncle Louie, and we'll see you in Breckenridge!

post #51 of 54
Thread Starter 


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by SugarCube View Post

 

 

 

On April 6th and 7th, my better half, Uncle Louie and another well-known ski coach, is offering to work with intermediate lady skiers to help us make that next break-through in our skills.  This is my first real all-women clinic-type of event, and even though I'm not gung-ho on group skiing, I'm very much looking forward to this event.  It's called CubeFest, and you can look for it under the "Let's Go" Forum.    There is only one more opening for this FREE event, so if you can make it, PM Uncle Louie, and we'll see you in Breckenridge!

Thanks SugarCube! I would have loved to meet up with all of you at CubeFest, but I'm actually going to be in Mammoth! It sounded like an awsome event that would have been perfect for me. Maybe next year!  I'll let ya'll know how I do in Mammoth with everything I have learned from all the helpful posts here.

 

post #52 of 54

Cubefest was a big help for me.  I was also extraordinarily lucky enough to work with Rick and Janis yesterday.  I had already purchased the first 2 DVDs that Rick has produced on basic balance and edging.  I am sure I will be buying the rest in the series.

 

For me, the kind of structured approach taken in those DVds to build and continually improve your skill set makes total sense.  Beyond that, Rick is so open to helping you to understand why you do what in which progression under what circumstances, why the ski does what it does under various circumstaces. 

 

If you're looking to move to the next level, I would highly recommend you consider looking at his web site and the DVDs he has available.  You can find them at www.yourskicoach.com

post #53 of 54

sorry..was tired when i posted this..wrong spot..great thread though for late beginners like me


Edited by dustyfog - 5/3/2009 at 11:56 pm GMT
post #54 of 54

Matilda, if you are in socal, you don't have to wait until you get to Tahoe to find a good bootfitter.  Claude at Skinet Sports on Ventura Blvd in the Burbank area is great.

 

http://www.skinetsports.com/html/askclaudeMainfr.html

 

That way you have the person who worked on your boots around locally and you can go back and get them fixed, plus not spending your vacation in the shop.

 

 

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