or Connect
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Looking at pictures

post #1 of 10
Thread Starter 
I am visually challenged when I try to "see" movement in three dimensions in still photos. In many action shots (i.e. Brian Bloom's photos on this site) it appears to me that the skiers are practically sitting on their tails. I know this can't be right. Since "seeing" what my students are doing is so important in teaching, and because I'll be going to LII exam next year, I'd appreciate some advice in this area.
post #2 of 10
Denya,

Look at how the skis are interacting with the snow. In the example you gave of looking like a skier is on his tails if they are the tips will be light, at and above the falline you would probably be seeing the bases of their skis. If the tips are diving downhill and you see the top sheets then the skier isn't back but compressed for a bump or other pressure management concern.

Lateral balance can also be seen at the ski snow interaction. Is one ski obviously light? Does one ski have more spray than the other? Is there excessive tip lead? Do the skis enter the turn simultaneously? Do they tip first or edge first? Do the skis move continually forward or is there a lateral component to its motion, if so where in the turn does it occur.

Study the cause and effect relationships that are an integral part of the four (rotation, counterotation, blocking pole plant or leg steering) or five (if you count deflection) turning mechanisms. When you are aware of how each piece fits into the puzzle at an intellectual level the skis will always tell you what really happened.
post #3 of 10
Ski tracks never lie.
post #4 of 10
Quote:
Originally posted by slider:
Ski tracks never lie.
Slider:

Would it not be possible to make that set of tracks with your weight on the tails (or at least your heels) through most of the turn?

Bob
post #5 of 10
Bob -

I've found that if I'm sitting back at the beginning of my turn my tracks show skidding at the turn initiation and often show skidding through out the turn as a result of my inside ski turning upward. On the other hand, if I sit back later in the turn while skiing on my stiffer skis I can often lay clean tracks. On skis with softer tails the tail washes out and you see skidding.
post #6 of 10
Denyadog--welcome to EpicSki! Not to change to subject, because there's some good discussion starting here, but you might want to check out this thread (click here to open in a new window). I've posted a bunch of tiny animations and cartoons, showing a few important skiing moves and situations in motion.

Best regards,
Bob Barnes
post #7 of 10
Thread Starter 
Thanks, for the ideas!

denyadog
post #8 of 10
Quote:
Originally posted by Bob Peters:
</font><blockquote>quote:</font><hr />Originally posted by slider:
Ski tracks never lie.
Slider:

Would it not be possible to make that set of tracks with your weight on the tails (or at least your heels) through most of the turn?

Bob
</font>[/quote]I guess it's possible but I'm not a back seat driver.
post #9 of 10
Quote:
Originally posted by slider:
</font><blockquote>quote:</font><hr />Originally posted by Bob Peters:

QUOTE]Slider:

Would it not be possible to make that set of tracks with your weight on the tails (or at least your heels) through most of the turn?

Bob
I guess it's possible but I'm not a back seat driver. [/QB]</font>[/quote]So if it is possible to make that set of tracks with weight on the heels, would it then be true that ski tracks actually *do* occasionally lie?

The photo does not clearly show the intitiation phase of this turn. It's a beautiful set of tracks, but I would bet that the portion of the turn we see in this photo could be made with the weight back. I think Bode Miller does this often, and on much harder snow.

Bob
post #10 of 10
I think Bode Miller does this often. Well when you put it that way. I'll be going to Mt.Hood this summer for some professional help. [img]tongue.gif[/img]
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Ski Instruction & Coaching