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Humbling Happens...

post #1 of 29
Thread Starter 

I used to rip. Really, I did. Competed in big events, blah, blah, blah. 

 

This kid blew me away. 

 

Recently, I ski about 40 days a year. Not spectacular, but enough to get my hops on. (You really don't forget after spending your 20's skiing 100+ days a year.)

 

I tron the trees when appropriate. And, I arc GS turns at night after work. When I arc GS turns, no snow leaves the ground. I've been arcing for over 20 years. Somewhere in there I used to arc really big turns on really big mountains with really big airs. I used to rip. 

 

The other day I was arcing said evening under the flood-lights... as I do. I suspect I was going around 40-50 mph. (Trying to be honest here.)

 

While on the face, mid G, this little prick appears into my line and decides to throw it switch. Then, while he's arcing backwards in my line, decides to look me in the eye. I started laughing. NEVER in my entire life has anyone ever made eye contact with me while arcing GS turns down steep faces. 

 

Then he links 2 turns just a few meters ahead of me before switching forward and taking off. 

 

He bowed to me in the lift line. (As per Japan)

 

This kid blew me away. Arced my line, faky, and looked me in the eye. It was like a fricking video-game. 

 

Truly humbling. 

 

I suck now. 

post #2 of 29

Old skiers never die.

 

They just become Gapers!

post #3 of 29

I didn't know Chaos skied in Japan.

 

Funny thing is I have spent the past two seasons coming to terms with the fact that I have regressed from  being able to rip to being just a plain "old" recreational skier.  I can still ski about everything resorts dish up pretty well.  But, I can't ski it they way I used to be able to. Mostly, I don't feel quite as comfortable launching big air when it isn't necessary to do so.   This is mostly a product of not skiing for over 10 years then only logging 5 days a year I just can't feel as comfortable with the big airs as I used to.

 

The good side is that I still enjoy skiing more than every recreational activity, maybe even more than I used to because I don't get to do it nearly so much.

 

Time to start teaching my kids to rip so they can blow me of the mountain.


Edited by crgildart - 2/12/2009 at 08:36 pm
post #4 of 29
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lars View Post

 

Old skiers never die.

 

They just become Gapers!

Surely the converse is true as well ...

 

Young skiers just get sicker?

 

Right? 

 

Please say yes. I've never been so awe-struck. 

 

I was on terminal velocity. There was no going faster... he just decided to switch it up and look me in the eye like it was Tuesday Night at the roller rink. 

 

Seriously. I'm dumbfounded at his comfort with that blind speed. 

 

(If some jackass comes in here and compares it to skiing pow in fog... then I'm not articulating myself well enough.)

 

Go as fast as you can possibly arc turns on your GS boards, and imagine a kid going backwards looking you in the eye... in your line. 

 

Seriously... GSers have been upped. 

 

post #5 of 29

My oldest Son Daryl, can do shit on skis I never dreamed of. I'd like to think that in my youth and these times of awesome ski equipment, I could do what he can. I'm not sure that would be true though. I'm not sure I had balls of steel enough to be 30 feet in the air doing multiple flips and spins, landing backwards.

 

I've watched him compete in events all over the country with some of today's best freestylers and realized how awesome these young kids are. Imagine hanging in the pipe with the likes of Tanner Hall and Jon Olsen. Ever hear of Cory Vanular? he and my Son took lessons together. Were it not for a couple steel rods and screws in his left leg, I'd like to think he could have gone pro. These days, he's just happy to be a Coach teaching other young hopefuls.

 

You're right though. As good as I'd like to think I am, I'm no match for his abilities at certain things. But, put us in powder, trees and moguls and I'll hold my own and laugh at trading face shots.

 

These kids are good though aren't they?

post #6 of 29

That kid sounds like a real punk.  What's with the eye-contact thing?

 

As for the humbling, I think it's good.  Some of the best [insert skill/job/sport/expertise here] I know are the ones who are humble.

post #7 of 29

Wow, imagine seeing that in a ski porn movie...

Every generation dares more than the precceding one...

How was the saying ?

Citius, altius, fortius

(Faster, Higher, Stronger)

post #8 of 29

Do you enjoy skiing?  If you do, then it really doesn't matter if someone is better than you.  There always were, are, and will be better skiers than any of us.

 

Too many people sacrifice enjoyment for perceived perfection.

post #9 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by samurai View Post

 

While on the face, mid G, Bob Peters appears into my line and decides to throw it switch. Then, while he's arcing backwards in my line, decides to look me in the eye. I started laughing. NEVER in my entire life has anyone ever made eye contact with me while arcing GS turns down steep faces. 

 

Truly humbling. 

 

I suck now. 

 

Hey I fixed it for you. 

 

Dood, there's always gonna be somebody better than you- especially when you're me and you suck! 

post #10 of 29

I close my eyes and visualize the scene...(beautifully recounted, btw; reading it I feel like I was there)

It makes me to want to laugh as well.

Reminds me of that scene of Top Gun where the F14 is flown upside down above the Russki jet (well a T-38 or F5 depicted as such, truly)

post #11 of 29

from the chair, I saw a guy drop a major chute in not great conditions. he was a half mile away or so and all you could see was the line and the general shape of the skier. I watched and thought: not a great turn, line just OK, but cool in the circumstance.  Then he pulls out and stops on the apron and I see he was skiing it switch. takes a bit more courage that way.

post #12 of 29

Samurai, you still rip, you just ran into Superman or Super Kid , or something from another dimension. Its great to witness what is possible in anything and then tell yourself I guess its humanly possible.

 

 I guess I set the bar pretty low, try and ski as well as I can in bumps try and carve etc etc. Still love it to death but its unbelievable what some people are capable of. I saw a kid a year or so ago maybe going 20 mph backwards and making some arcs and that impressed the hell out of me.

 

But feeling good about yourself  and what you're doing in any sport is all relative. Guys that golf that at one time could score in the low 70's give up the sport when they get older and rarely break 80. I know a guy who is 75 on the trail I jog on that is having trouble coming to grips with the fact his 10K time goes up every year and meanwhile he has to be the fittest guy his age on the planet.

 

In many ways in sports over the long haul it might be better to have never really excelled at a high high level, because anything less than that becomes hard to live with. Never had that issue Fortunately or Unfortunately .

post #13 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by fischermh View Post

 

Do you enjoy skiing?  If you do, then it really doesn't matter if someone is better than you.  There always were, are, and will be better skiers than any of us.

 

Too many people sacrifice enjoyment for perceived perfection.

 Well, in this case it is not "perceived perfection", rather is,  push the envelope beyond what was thinkable so far.

 

post #14 of 29

Lol....I know the feeling.

 

Rip-page is my forte if nothing else.

 

Last month at Mt. Snow, I was arcing some turns at high speeds when these two little racers in speed suits blasted by me like I was in reverse.   When I got to the bottom I over heard the parents talking (they also looked like racers), even they were in disbelief as to their progeny's' fearless, high speed, hi-jinks.....I was humbled.....(lucky for those little twerps I wasn't on my race skis......)

 

 

The icing on your cake would be if he gave you the finger while looking at you.....LOL, now that would be hilarious.

post #15 of 29

I don't know if it was entirely disrespect as much as some of the opposite.. more like:

 

[lips out of synch with words]"pretty good old man, but I can do better"[/lips out of synch with words]

post #16 of 29

I am over the hill, but still trying to ski it.  I am humbled on a routine basis at Kirkwood, where the terminal velocity and exposure tolerance of skiers like skier666 and Tyrone Shoelaces is so far out of my league its ridiculous.   I used to be better, but both my physical and mental game took a hit as I am making my way through my 50s.  I hope to turn it around, but I'll never be 28 again, so I try to enjoy the line I'm on and not dwell on it too much.  

 

The Hot Dog generation did amazing things, but the new generation of skiers has explored boundaries so far outside that envelope it isn't even funny.   Is the use of parachutes and flying suits even skiing?

post #17 of 29

As I get older I find myself ripping GS turns on groomed runs more and more.  I fool around and try switch, but I don't think I'll ever get it, and certainly not at great speed.  I still hit the steeps and trees and bumps, but I try to enjoy my day more, and I'm never going to ski that stuff as great as I did when I was younger.

 

But for me it's just as fun to watch the 'kids' do that stuff even though I know I'll never do it.  It makes me proud to be a skier.  It gives me the sense of just knowing it can be done.  I know people who don't ski and they would look at Samurai and the kid riding switch and just think they're both skiing fast.

 

It's hard to explain, but I'm sure people here understand it.  When I watch the x-games and see what these guys and gals are doing, I am always so much more impressed than my wife.  She sees and says 'yeah, that was great' in a non-chalant type of way, where as I'm shaking my head in dis-belief.

 

I guess that why we watch ski porn.  We watch these guys ski huge lines, hit huge air, slam down pillows etc, and the whole time we're thinking, "I could do that...I might try that...No WAY would I attempt that...that face is 'doable'...he's gonna go down THAT?!!!...wish I could do that...etc, etc."  At least that's what goes through my head.  I always feel there are thing on those films I could do if given the chance, then there's the stuff I watch and say NO WAY could I ever do that!!  But it makes you feel like a SKIER.  We are all skiers here.  And to me skiing is just the best.  I'm NEVER gonna do Hospital Air like Tyrone, but I still feel like I could hang with Tyrone for a run or two...maybe 1.5... ha ha

 

Anyway, now I'm just rambling, but man I love skiing.  And hearing about a guy ripping GS turns at mach speed SWITCH just reminded me of friggin cool skiing is.

 

 

 

 

 

 

post #18 of 29

I'm getting all the bumps, trees and backcountry my old body allows me. I find it gets boring real fast making countless high speed turns down cruisers. Especially when there is some jerk in a yellow jacket yelling at me to slow down and take it easy.

 

Hell, I don't know how long I can continue to do this. But Goddamit, I ain't dead yet. And if i ever get to the point when I can't keep up with these kids, I'll take up knitting.

 

I don't profess to being the skier I was 15 years ago, but i refuse to let myself think I can't cut the rug anymore. I'd rather slip into the backcountry somewhere near Vail and never be found.

post #19 of 29

Sam: You've been served.

post #20 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by samurai View Post

 

I used to rip. Really, I did. Competed in big events, blah, blah, blah. 

 

This kid blew me away. 

 

Recently, I ski about 40 days a year. Not spectacular, but enough to get my hops on. (You really don't forget after spending your 20's skiing 100+ days a year.)

 

I tron the trees when appropriate. And, I arc GS turns at night after work. When I arc GS turns, no snow leaves the ground. I've been arcing for over 20 years. Somewhere in there I used to arc really big turns on really big mountains with really big airs. I used to rip. 

 

The other day I was arcing said evening under the flood-lights... as I do. I suspect I was going around 40-50 mph. (Trying to be honest here.)

 

While on the face, mid G, this little prick appears into my line and decides to throw it switch. Then, while he's arcing backwards in my line, decides to look me in the eye. I started laughing. NEVER in my entire life has anyone ever made eye contact with me while arcing GS turns down steep faces. 

 

Then he links 2 turns just a few meters ahead of me before switching forward and taking off. 

 

He bowed to me in the lift line. (As per Japan)

 

This kid blew me away. Arced my line, faky, and looked me in the eye. It was like a fricking video-game. 

 

Truly humbling. 

 

I suck now. 

 What skis was he on? 

I want those! 

 

post #21 of 29

People that can ski switch down steep faces with style impress the heck out of me.

 

I used to ski switch a lot better when I wasn't rocking a ton of forward lean and rearwards mounting points.  But I doubt I'll ever be able to nonchalantly cruise switch at 40mph down big faces, even if I started practicing tomorrow and didn't stop for a year.  Impressive story there.

 

post #22 of 29

You have just been given an eye-opener.  Embrace it.  You are now able to advance past the level you were stuck at.

 

Let's face it.  Making GS arcs at speed is a pretty easy thing to do.  You have to push things a little to make them exciting or challenging, GS turns at 3 Gs, GS arcs though gnarly terrain, etcetera.

 

As to the speed, well it's simple physics not much to do with ability there.  I could ski just as fast 30 years ago as I can now; point 'em down hill and they will go faster.

 

As to the skiing switch,  many years ago I had occasion to ski backwards (watching my wife who was learning).  It didn't seem all that hard after doing it for a little while.  It's harder now that I haven't done it for quite a few years, and I have no intention of getting good at it again because I prefer to see where I'm going, but it is not something that would terribly impress me.

 

I had a similar experience to your's one day at a Karate tournament,  a few days after listening to a guest instructor tell us how it was really stupid to try and score a point with a side kick because it was just too slow.  Well we went to the red and white shiai.  Red team and white team line up and two people at the front of each line fight.  Winner stays up, looser get's replaced by the next guy in line.  It's all good fun.  The guy two in front of my did extremely well.  I ended up facing a much better opponent.  Step up to the line, Judge says begin.  There is a break in the space time continuum.  I find myself standing about 15 feet back behind the line unable to breath, with a memory of being side kicked dead center of the do (body shield ;we wore kendo armour back in the day).

Wazari!.  Step back up to the line (still not breathing).  Ajumi!  Repeat.  Ipon.  He had gotten me twice with a sidekick, no combination, no tricks, just a very quick sidekick.  I decided that it was possible to nail someone with a sidekick, even though they might be ready.  I could do it too.  It took me a few years, but I got there.

 

Oh I was able to breath again in about 5 or 10 minutes. 

post #23 of 29
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by skier219 View Post

 

That kid sounds like a real punk.  What's with the eye-contact thing?

 

As for the humbling, I think it's good.  Some of the best [insert skill/job/sport/expertise here] I know are the ones who are humble.

I don't think he was being a punk. He did bow to me in the lift line out of respect afterwards. I think he was just toying with me. 

Quote:
Originally Posted by fischermh View Post

 

Do you enjoy skiing?  If you do, then it really doesn't matter if someone is better than you.  There always were, are, and will be better skiers than any of us.

 

Too many people sacrifice enjoyment for perceived perfection.

I don't ski to be good anymore. Used to, but don't anymore. I just ski for the feeling. I posted this little story to share my excitement. Only a few times in my life (even when I was on tour) did somebody do something that was so far out of my element I couldn't stop laughing. 

 

Another time was at a freeskiing camp in NZ in 2000. A 16yo threw a double lincoln loop. This was kinda like that. 

 

Quote:

Originally Posted by prickly View Post

 

Sam: You've been served.

 That was the look in his eye. 

post #24 of 29

Laughing is good.  I think he did respect you.  There is a bond there. 

post #25 of 29

I doubt he would have gone out of his way to buzz you if he didn't think you were worthy.  How many times did you buzz an instructor, old ex racer throwing some nice arcs, or even maybe a patrol tearing it up when you were younger?   I did it fairly often in my teens and always out of respect at a safe distance, just barely safe distance tee hee.


Edited by crgildart - 2/13/2009 at 06:14 pm
post #26 of 29

Nice story Samurai. 

Aren't you supposed to off yourself in dramatic fashion now? (Not suggesting it by any means!)

I really should search for a bit more appropriate video, but I know you liked this one last spring from that SUV thread, so I'll post it again!

 

post #27 of 29
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by crgildart View Post

 

I doubt he would have gone out of his way to buzz you if he didn't think you were worthy.  How many times did you buzz an instructor, olde ex racer throwing some nice arcs, or even maybe a patrol tearing it up when you were younger?   I did it fairly often in my teens and always out of respect at a safe distance, just barely safe distance tee hee.

 

That's exactly it. It was all good fun. (And mind-blowing.)

 

Strangely enough, the 'safe distance' was around 6 feet between our tips. And not once did I contemplate slowing down. The laughing came from the comfort of it all. 

post #28 of 29

Six feet between your tips, skiing forward, and his tips skiing backward, all going 40mph?

Yeah I gotta say that's pretty impressive and cool at the same time!

 

post #29 of 29
Thread Starter 

Thanks for the vid, Tog.

 

I love SOAD. 

 

And yes, I am now preparing a ritual to exit from the era of young ripper to middle-aged master.  

 

 

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