New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Tipping Ski Instructor - Page 2

post #31 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by CascadeRider View Post

 

Yes my job is one of the best a girl can have and yes I am a full-time ski instructor.

 

 

I tell prospective new instructors in hiring clinics that this is the best job in the world, once you deal with that pesky vow of poverty.

post #32 of 47
Well the problem is how the industry is presenting itself. It's set up as teaching/professional, not service. On the latter it's customary to give tips despite the expenses (i.e. expensive restaurant/hotel), however when the end consumer is dealing with the former a tip is not expected. If I take a lesson, I didn't hire a guide/butler, I paid for someone to pass me the knowledge/guidance I desire. When is the last time you tipped your teacher/professor/priest, or having any of them expecting a tip? It not only unexpected, but also impolite at best.

Just give perspective from the consumers point of view, I certainly have no idea about it till I read about it on this forum.
post #33 of 47
Whe
Quote:
Originally Posted by mike_m View Post

This has been covered numerous times in numerous threads.  You might consider using the "Search" function.  Briefly, beginning instructors are paid an average of about $9 an hour.  The most experienced and most requested are paid around $19-$25.  Do the math.  The resort gets virtually all of the price of the lesson, especially privates.  If you received a lesson that exceeded your expectations, a tip is always appreciated.
where are you getting this info from ?

I think you guys should reference glassdoor about salariesr
post #34 of 47
Also why don't ski instructors do Independant ski consulting ? Like lessons on their own ?
post #35 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by yuik View Post

Also why don't ski instructors do Independant ski consulting ? Like lessons on their own ?

Getting banned from hill if caught.
post #36 of 47
Interes
Quote:
Originally Posted by jzmtl View Post

Getting banned from hill if caught.[

Interesting . Do they say this in their policy ?

And I am saying assuming you don't work there .

Like why can't I have a website say I'm a tits ski instructor . Have season passes to 3 places all near me and give lessons that undercut the mountains . And spread via Craigslist and word of mouth ?

I am not considering this but similar to how people leave Accenture avande ibm to do their own consulting work . Why not in skiing ?
post #37 of 47

Basically the mountains ski school has "concession rights".

 

http://www.breakthroughonskis.com/Pages/_ski_instruction/instruction12.html
 

post #38 of 47
It's their turf, same reason you can't just push a hotdog cart into stadium during a ball game and start selling.
post #39 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by jzmtl View Post

It's their turf, same reason you can't just push a hotdog cart into stadium during a ball game and start selling.

but you could easily enforce that. Do you think they could even remotely enforce the lessons on their domain? I feel like it would be nearly impossible. 

 

like how could they tell that you are teaching a friend for pleasure vs a private customer for business. 

 

Im talking private 1 on 1 sessions. Actually come to think of it when i raced for my college team we would pay washed up pros (they werent really A list pros , more like Brian Scalabrines of basketball with our schools money) to watch us and give us tips for the day. The same way we paid our "coach" and alumni who gave us "lessons" / tips/ lead drills. 

post #40 of 47
I don't think they go look for people like that, but if you keep showing up with a different guy to teach it'll get suspicious eventually.
post #41 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by jzmtl View Post

I don't think they go look for people like that, but if you keep showing up with a different guy to teach it'll get suspicious eventually.

yeah I was just curious because I never really thought about it. 

 

edit: until i realized what a low % the guys teaching lessons were getting. Also I have seen some pretty poor lessons at expensive mountains which made me think that they hired almost anyone. 

 

it used to annoy me when I was younger thinking I could definitly run better gate times than this old man. But later that mindset changed when i considered that phil jackson most likely would loose in a game of 1 on 1 to Harrison Ford, yet he would be ages ahead of him in coaching. 

post #42 of 47

At the mtns I most frequently go to, the instructors for continuous week lessons get paid somewhere b/t $9-10. They have to be there for a full 8a-3p day but only get paid during actual lesson time (not prep time, apres/wrap up time).... so in reality, they get paid way way less.
 

post #43 of 47

I've taken at least 1 lesson a year for the last 8-9 years now.  They've been at random places, so it's kind of funny that my best lesson ever and my worst lesson ever have both been at Jackson Hole...where I've only taken 2 lessons.

 

The Best Lesson Instructor got 100-dollar tip for a 1/2-day private...the Worst Lesson Instructor, um, didn't.  I wish I could remember the name of the Best Lesson guy, since it was only about 5 years ago or so, and he might still be there.

post #44 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by yuik View Post

but you could easily enforce that. Do you think they could even remotely enforce the lessons on their domain? I feel like it would be nearly impossible. 

 

like how could they tell that you are teaching a friend for pleasure vs a private customer for business. 

 

Im talking private 1 on 1 sessions. Actually come to think of it when i raced for my college team we would pay washed up pros (they werent really A list pros , more like Brian Scalabrines of basketball with our schools money) to watch us and give us tips for the day. The same way we paid our "coach" and alumni who gave us "lessons" / tips/ lead drills. 

 

Its not easily enforceable, but if you are caught, you're in deep, deep trouble. First off, if you are employed by a mountain, and you are caught freelancing on their mountain or another mountain, you will be terminated on the spot. Second of all, since you are using a mountain's lifts and trails to provide a competing service in an area where the ski area has an exclusive concession, you can (and most likely will) be cited for theft of services. And by cited, I don't mean by the Ski Patrol. I'm talking by the police. Usually the police forces in ski towns take ToS very seriously, as those ski towns rely on the ski area income for their livelihoods as well. So, if you get caught teaching a paid lesson on a hill without being employed by the mountain, you may very likely find yourself in cuffs, fingerprinted, mug shots, and a big fat fine to pay at the end of it all, on top of being blacklisted from that mountain, and all the mountains in the vicinity. If you go about it like you're saying, as in advertising it on Craigslist, then you're pretty much guaranteeing yourself all that headache. 

 

All that being said, that is for PAID lessons. If you're an instructor, and you want to teach your friends, family, girl(s)-you-want-to-hook-up-with how to ski on your own time and your own dime, have fun with it. 

 

And when you're talking about race programs, they have their own arrangement with the mountain. They pay a certain amount to be on the mountain to train, and they provide their own coaches. Who they provide is their deal. 

post #45 of 47

$20 is what I tip for a four group all day lesson.  Probably same for half day lesson.  That's about 15-20%.  Less or not at all if instructor doesn't do a good job.  More if they do an outstanding job.

 

If you are with the same person for multiple days like some of the clinic lessons, I apply the same 15-20% usual tipping percentage to the total. 

post #46 of 47

one word: liability. If a client I'm teaching is hurt during a lesson, the resort backs me up. If I'm "freelancing", then I'm responsible and that could get ugly. It's also more enforceable than you might think -- even on our busiest days, with literally hundreds of instructors on the hill, there are eyes everywhere and the powers that be know what's going on.

 

I just finished several days of teaching kids groups -- managing 8 kids, getting them around the mountain, feeding them lunch, making sure they're safe, happy AND learning. One day, I was wallowing in $20s. One day, zippo. I really think it's mainly ignorance on parents' part, not necessarily cheapness.

post #47 of 47
I was just looking at Stowe's lesson rate earlier today and thought of this thread. When people are paying $145 an hour they certainly will think instructors probably make more than they do, and a tip is out of the question when they make that much money.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: General Skiing Discussion