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Boot Flex Softening?

post #1 of 9
Thread Starter 

Boot Flex Softening?

 

I’m a PSIA instructor and I’m somewhat perplexed. After skiing with numerous examiners and trainers one constant comment is that I need to close my ankle more. I’m beginning to think that the flex of my boots (Tecnica Icon Alu) needs to be softened. I’ve had extensive bootfitting work done on my boots, sole planning, cants, toe lifts etc. I’ve been fortunate in that the techs who have worked on my boots allowed me to observe and help in the process. I’m comfortable working with tools having taught Technology Education for 32 years and have made my own alpine skis. My question is; if I were to cut additional vertical slots in my boots how far towards the cuff  and how deep could/should I make the cuts without jeopardizing the integrity of the boot? Presently the cuff has two vertical slots, one on each side. Each slot is approximately 2 ¼” long and ½” wide. From the back of the cuff (Achilles Tendon) each slot is approximately 1/3 of the distance towards the front of the cuff, on their respective sides. My apologies for the length of the post, but I tried to list as much information as I thought necessary.

 

 

Thanks!, Pinelander

 

You don't grow too old to play, you grow old because you stop playing.

 

post #2 of 9

I would start with lowering the front of the cuff by 5mm at a time.

 

a boots flex comes from many things but one is the 4 bits of plastic that overlap on the front of the boot bending, and flexing.   Lower 2 of the 4 parts and it will become a bit easier.

 

The boot already has a cut notch to make it softer, No idea why you can't add another one, but just that I have not seen that done, and I have seen great results with lowers the cuff height.

 

 

post #3 of 9

I have a similar problem, a Nordica Supercharger Enforcer, the yellow one, too stiff for me. On the back of the cuff is a big bolt that screws into a nut in the lower shell. You're supposed to loosen it while adjusting the cant, then tighten it back up. Can I just remove the nut and bolt and tape up the hole, like drilling out the rivet in a race boot?  I tried it one one boot in the house, and it felt pretty good.

post #4 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by evansilver View Post

 

I have a similar problem, a Nordica Supercharger Enforcer, the yellow one, too stiff for me. On the back of the cuff is a big bolt that screws into a nut in the lower shell. You're supposed to loosen it while adjusting the cant, then tighten it back up. Can I just remove the nut and bolt and tape up the hole, like drilling out the rivet in a race boot?  I tried it one one boot in the house, and it felt pretty good.

 

 

remove the rivit and ski it like that.  See if you like it.

 

If you do great,  if not put the rivit back

post #5 of 9

For the OP, +1 re. what mntlion said.

 

Also consider that you're in a relatively soft boot.  I'm skeptical that cutting more slots in your boot is going to solve the problem.

 

1)  Is it a  leverage problem, i.e. you just can't get over/into the front of the boot?  Consider short tibia/long foot ratio, ankle range of motion, etc.

 

2)  Are you skiing behind your feet, i.e. is it a technical/motor skills problem?

 

3)  Would you benefit from a forward lean shim (calf volume, preference) to help you stay in the center of the boot +/- engage the tongue?

 

4)  Is your delta/ramp angle combination too much, i.e. should you change to a flatter binding setup?

 

5)  Have you skied in a really soft boot (i.e. coaching/alpine touring boot) to assess the outcome?

 

 

post #6 of 9
Thread Starter 

Mtnlion and jdstefa, thanks for the advice/suggestions! It's always great to have additional ideas when trying to solve a problem! 

 

You don't grow too old to play, you grow old because you stop playing.

post #7 of 9
Thread Starter 

Mtnlion and jdistefa - I really appreciate your suggestions. I have been thinking about them and have discussed them with a fellow instructor. I'd like to explore one of your suggestions of the tibia length relative to foot length. The distance from the middle of the ankle joint (navicular/talus area) to the tibial plateau is 15 inches. My shoe size is 10 1/2 to 11 depending on the last used to make the shoe. In your opinion do my measurements fall into the category of short tibia/long foot? If so, what would you suggest to deal with this situation. Also, I lowered the cuff by 5mm and noticed some softrning in the flex. I'm contemplating lowering the cuff by a few more mm's. Thanks again for your help.

 

You don't grow too old to play, you grow old because you stop playing.

post #8 of 9

Hi Pinelander,

 

Also try moving the knee forward to bring your COM just ahead of the boot sole center when you are centered in the boot cuff(we use a laser to determine when this is correct).  Add an extra spoiler to see what the effect is, if you don't like it--no harm done.

 

miketsc

cped/master bootfitter

post #9 of 9
Thread Starter 

Thanks miketsc! As I previously stated I've had extensive boot work done. Greg Hoffman did most of the work but I'm trying to fine tune based on feedback from clinicians and examiners. Greg removed the spoilers and recommended that I not use them. During my last clinic - Level II Prep, both examiners noted that my ankle needs to close more. They also noted that I might benefit from putting a tongue spacer in the boots as there is about 1/2" of space between my shin (when standing in a balanced position) and the boot tongue. This is in spite of me having relatively large calves.

 

You don't grow too old to play, you grow old because you stop playing

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