or Connect
EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › Ski Gear Discussion › Snow sticking to bottom of boots
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Snow sticking to bottom of boots

post #1 of 25
Thread Starter 

Hey guys,

 

Haven't seen this question discussed....  Not sure if this is just the fake snow I have been skiing on or if i will see this same problem in Colorado.

 

I bought my first pair of ski boots so i could start to get a little more serious about the sport and be more comfortable.  They are Solomon Mission RS 8's, they fit great and so far have been excellent once they are in the skis...

 

Out of the skis snow sticks to the bottom of these things like nothing I have encountered.  Sticks to the bottom and gets so packed that I have to use my ski pole to get the snow off.  The snow pack doesn't allow me to get into my bindings... 

 

Usually this doesn't bother me because once I am in the skis I am usually in them for 4 hours without taking them off, but this weekend I took a fall and was stuck on the side of a hill trying to get my skis back on while snow is sticking to the bottom of these boots.

 

I would finally get snow off one boot and get in the ski, and then try to balance on the one foot and get the snow off the other while trying to get into my other ski.....quite difficult when you are on the side of a hill LOL.

 

Anybody have tips for me?  Is this just an issue with the temperature of the snow or is it the boot itself?  Is there anything I can spray on the bottom of the boots to keep this from happening?

 

Thanks so much for the help!

post #2 of 25

I scrape the snow off using the edge of my ski.  Don't just force the boot in with snow on it; you don't want the snow interfereing with the release/prerelease/non-release of the binding.

post #3 of 25

Very common problem and will matter less as you become more accomplished at skiing in general (you will be out of your skis less and standing on one ski on a slope gets easier too) .  I stand on foot, put the other across my knee, one pole on the ground (for balance), and take the other pole and whack the side of the boot resting on your knee.  Sometimes just a quick whack will remove the snow, without lifting it to your knee.

 

The scrape across the binding sideways (snow needs to fall to side, not into binding area), works for some, and the pick it out of the boot is all that works some days when the snow is really sticky, packing snow.  Happens no matter what snow you ski, heavy wet packing snow (great snowman snow), tends to clump most, and sometimes man made snow has a tendency to be stickier.

post #4 of 25

Holemenkol sells a product to spray onto ski gear, that's a de-icer, basically its a silicone based lube.  That being said spraying some silicone might prevent as much snow adhesion, albeit the boots might be more slippery walking around.

post #5 of 25

I have this problem when we stay slopeside, where I end up taking warm boots that have been indoors overnight and walking directly onto the snow in the morning -- it causes a real clod of snow to build up on the bottom of the boots, especially the heel.  If I am lucky, it will fall off when I whack my boots with a pole, but more often I need to pick/scrape/hammer the snow clod with the tip of my pole.  It's a real PITA first thing in the morning when I just want to click in and ski off.  

 

I was thinking about silicone spray or grease, the downside is that I might track it back indoors and it would probably attract dirt.  And who knows, it might cause me to fall on my a$$ some other time....

post #6 of 25

I'd have concerns with a silicone based spray affecting your boot hold in your binding.  Silicone is a really slippery base.  My only experience with a silicone spray base was used where I worked to move boxes (slide) them on metal shelving.  Made them just shoot across like they weighed nothing.

post #7 of 25

I wouldn't worry about the binding function so much, in fact bindings have low friction pads on toe pieces just for this reason, so that friction between the sole and the pad doesn't interfere with the boot release after the mechanism has tripped.  The retention/release action on bindings is almost purely mechanical; as long as the boots fit properly you should be OK -- just don't wedge a banana peel in there .

post #8 of 25

Apply Salomon Grease (Ref.#000905) or the equivalent to the lubrication points indicated for the appropriate model. Do not use silicone or penetrating oils unless the lubricant is speciically approved.

 

Directly from the 09 Salomon shop practices manual.  Silicones aren't specifically approved anywhere I know of.

 

Some silicone sprays have some pretty serious solvents attached to them, I'd be careful using them on plastic parts willy-nilly for that reason as well.  I do wipe down the brake pads on my binders with pledge (a parrafin lube in a handy liquid form) when I wipe down the rest of my topsheets with it...unapproved lube there, but the brake pad is not closely related to function in most bindings.

 

The only time it was really bad this year was the time I fell in a stream, jammed a ski under a rock, and had to walk out through snow and running water.  That was embarrassing.

post #9 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by Garrett View Post

Apply Salomon Grease (Ref.#000905) or the equivalent to the lubrication points indicated for the appropriate model. Do not use silicone or penetrating oils unless the lubricant is specifically approved.

 

Directly from the 09 Salomon shop practices manual.  Silicones aren't specifically approved anywhere I know of.

 

Some silicone sprays have some pretty serious solvents attached to them, I'd be careful using them on plastic parts willy-nilly for that reason as well.  I do wipe down the brake pads on my binders with pledge (a parrafin lube in a handy liquid form) when I wipe down the rest of my topsheets with it...unapproved lube there, but the brake pad is not closely related to function in most bindings.

 

The only time it was really bad this year was the time I fell in a stream, jammed a ski under a rock, and had to walk out through snow and running water.  That was embarrassing.

That's the first time I read anything contra silicone and plastics, quite the contrary it is common practice (as I know you are aware) to condition all plastic and rubber parts with silicone spray to preserve them and to keep them from drying out....the auto manufacturers even recommend this practice.   The majority of those dressing sprays (Armor-all, Eagle 1, etc.) are primarily comprised of silicone lubricants.  The only negative thing I have heard when used on vinyl applications, is that the silicone will over time tend to clog the pores and render the material unable to absorb any further lubricant.  As such some automotive restorers/preservers, prefer to use pure lemon oil....this is not a concern for ski gear.

 

Strange that Salomon would have that.  There are silicone additives and ski waxes (I have a few blocks of it), and if I am not mistaken boots are a formulation of polyurethane, which happens to be the stuff used for performance automobile bushings, which can only be lubricated specifically with silicone grease.

 

Well, Ive been using that Holmenkol spray for a number of years with no deleterious effects....it now goes by the name No-Wax and is made for spraying onto Nordic ski bottoms to prevent ice build up.
 

 


Edited by Richie-Rich - 2/9/2009 at 04:51 pm


Edited by Richie-Rich - 2/9/2009 at 04:52 pm
post #10 of 25

Tighten your bindings.  Don't walk so much.

post #11 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by Caucasian Asian View Post

Tighten your bindings.  Don't walk so much.

 

Snow sticking to your boots is not a reason to adjust your bindings.

 

Personally, I stomp/slide my boot bottom across the top of the toe piece of my bindings to clear the snow from my boots. Easier than using a pole. It's almost like a ritual for me - I do it every time I step into them. I would not mess around with lubricants or such - just learn to clear your boots by scraping on your toe piece. Once you get that skill down, the snow-on-boots-thing becomes a non-issue.

 

Also, orient yourself on slope so that you are stepping into your uphill ski (makes it easier).

post #12 of 25

I always carry a high pressure fireplace butane lighter, just flame off the snow. My boot dealer turned me on to this trick. 

post #13 of 25

Another reason to keep any silicone lubes/sprays away from automotive use is their incredible ability to screw up new paint.  Just for giggles I looked up my fave car cleaning supplies and none of them appear to have silicones in them.  I like Meguiar's natural shine for interior plastics/vinyl.  I like Eagle One Wax as you Dry while drying.  I don't have a fave tire shine, but none I looked at MSDS for had silicones, though silicones might not be listed.  The waxes I use on paint are wax, apparently even the Eagle One WAUD is wax and water.  I haven't used anything from Armor All in a really long time.

 

My dad called me just the other day asking me about silicone sprays, and the one he had purchased specifically recommended its use on ski bindings.  A quick look at the ingredients revealed some chlorinated solvents I don't think it would be wise to use on plastics without some more detailed knowledge, given that at least one is used in solvent welding some plastics and also given that you don't really want to mix solvents with binding grease.  Caveat emptor.

 

Plain silicone spray lubes (carefully look at ingredients) are useful for a lot of things, but I wouldn't use them on ski boots, ski boots are slick enough without help.  That snow sometimes sticks to them is less annoying than walking around on wet polished concrete in them.

 

beyond: that is pretty cool.  I'd add that to my pack but I'm afraid I'd break it.

post #14 of 25

Silicone bad for paint????  That's quite contrary to what I know.   In fact owners of show cars often trade the performance of conventional hydraulic brake fluid (that melts paint), for silicone brake fluid which will not damage finishes but more easily compresses...giving a mushy brake feel.

 

Silicone is problem prior to applying new paint, but good prep and cleaning takes care of that.

post #15 of 25
Quote:

Silicone is problem prior to applying new paint, but good prep and cleaning takes care of that.

 

Good luck with that!  Every paint line has fisheye eliminators because it really isn't that easy.  This is a bit like avoiding food poisoning...a problem of cross contamination and unseen hazards.

 

I've never understood why glycol fluid is a problem with show cars.  Not getting brake fluid on paint is actually pretty simple. The idea that you'd purposefully use inferior fluid just so you can be a klutz seems odd to me.  I'm a huge klutz, I change brake fluid every couple years, and I never get any on paint.  Gasoline is a problem.  Coolant as well, but for different reasons.  Then again, I don't really understand "show cars" in general, so that could be part of my problem.

 

Does anyone have "show skis"?  I know I have some up on the wall, but I don't take them down and wax them now and again just so I can pretend like I might actually use them.

post #16 of 25

....thread drift continued

 

The silicone brake fluid was originally developed for race car use (I think it may have trickled down from aviation), since it does not boil....so you have to take the good with the bad.

 

If you have a show car with a $20k+ paint job, it doesn't get driven often, and certainly not in ways that might require high performance braking. 

 

Strangely I read that Harley's come exclusively with silicone brake fluid.

post #17 of 25

I usually keep an old plastic wax scraper in a pocket.  Give it to a pal.  I scrape your boots, you scrape mine.

post #18 of 25

Pam frying pan spray is a good snow release agent for ski boots...organic biodegradable, also.  Silicone spray also works for me.

 

Abraded boot soles (from walking on pavement) cause the snow to stick worse.  www.snowshack.com/detail/SNW+SI-03490+J_Seirus+Innovation+Cat+Tracks are a big help to preserve the boot soles.  By the way, punching a hot nail through the little pull-on tabs and installing a loop of cord makes the Cat Tracks easier to get on & off.  Tying a piece of string to the Cat Tracks with a clip to a ski boot buckle keeps the Cat Track dangling alongside after one inevitably falls off.

post #19 of 25

easy thing to do is to kick the bottom of your boot back and forth on the top of you binding. This works well for me

post #20 of 25

I ues a product called 303 Protectant. It's an aerospace product that has been around for years. This stuff will keep snow from sticking to your soles, as well as prevent the plastics that your boots are made of from damage from UV rays.

I've been using it for over 20 years in  the marine industry, and this product has always done what the package says it will do. For skiing I apply it to every plastic that is on my gear. In years of use I've never had anything get sunbleached when I've applied this stuff.

It's amazing, and it lasts a long time between applications.

Check it out here: www.303products.com/

 

Mike

post #21 of 25

When boots are new and the plastic on the bottom is smooth the snow usually does not stick.  As the bottoms get beat up from walking in parking lots, etc. they tend to accumulate snow build up more easily.  You can remedy this by putting duct tape on the boot bottoms, but beware it makes them slippery at times when you may not want it.

post #22 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by mudfoot View Post

 You can remedy this by putting duct tape on the boot bottoms, but beware it makes them slippery at times when you may not want it.


 SRSLY dubious there...you'd be assuming all risk and losing any expectation that the binding would work as advertised.  I know people do this for specific temporary reasons, but increasing the risk that you'll break your leg so you don't have to bend over now and again seems like an odd compromise.

post #23 of 25

Don't but the duct tape over the toe or heel at the binding interface, just the other 95% of the bottom of your boot.

post #24 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by skier219 View Post

I wouldn't worry about the binding function so much, in fact bindings have low friction pads on toe pieces just for this reason, so that friction between the sole and the pad doesn't interfere with the boot release after the mechanism has tripped.  The retention/release action on bindings is almost purely mechanical; as long as the boots fit properly you should be OK -- just don't wedge a banana peel in there .

The problem vis a vis bindings and snow on your boots is you might inadvertently not fully click into your binding because of the block of ice on the bottom of your boot, causing you to ski away while being half-prereleased.

post #25 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ghost View Post
Quote:
Originally Posted by skier219 View Post

I wouldn't worry about the binding function so much, in fact bindings have low friction pads on toe pieces just for this reason, so that friction between the sole and the pad doesn't interfere with the boot release after the mechanism has tripped.  The retention/release action on bindings is almost purely mechanical; as long as the boots fit properly you should be OK -- just don't wedge a banana peel in there .

The problem vis a vis bindings and snow on your boots is you might inadvertently not fully click into your binding because of the block of ice on the bottom of your boot, causing you to ski away while being half-prereleased.

 

No argument there -- that's the exact reason I pick off every last bit of snow and ice.  I was saying that a *spray* on the bottom of the boot probably won't have much effect on binding function.

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Ski Gear Discussion
EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › Ski Gear Discussion › Snow sticking to bottom of boots