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How long is your ski day? - Page 3

post #61 of 85

50 plus days a year 10 hours a day.  But that will not allways be just skiing.

post #62 of 85

Some hard cores here.

 

I almost never ski past lunch.  I go up in the morning and and head home when I'm hungry.

 

Unfortunately my drive through Mexican place was shut down for selling meth through the drive through window.

 

 

Patrolling can be darkness to darkness of course.

post #63 of 85

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Skiing-in-Jackson View Post

2-5 hours, everyday


Me too.

 

There are quite a few days I go longer, bell to bell, and even with an OB hike afterward, but when you ski every day, there ceases to be this feeling that a ski day is an uncommon thing that must be desperately clung to, and milked dry, to the point of suffering.

 

As someone stated earlier, I count as a ski day, every day that I click in and ride.

 

I always find this topic funny when it comes up, because invariably, people who spend relatively few days on the mountain in a year attempt to assert the value of their ski year as equal or greater to those who ski much more often. That's just silly.

 

 

 

post #64 of 85

Well, but it is true that the less you ski the more you want to milk it. Some days, when the weather is crap, I stand on my porch with a beer or something, looking across the valley at people grimly making runs until closing time. I figure they just don't get out as much as I do. I can afford to be a little pickier. Don't ski as much as VA, but still enough to pick my spots.

post #65 of 85

I skied 53 days this season.  I usually get on the lift shortly after opening at 9, take about a 45 minute lunch break, then ski to about 3:30.  Durng my 3-week vacation in Colorado I skied 6 days each week (took Saturdays off).  I turn 63 next week and run most 40 year olds into the ground.   

post #66 of 85

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by JimH View Post

 I turn 63 next week and run most 40 year olds into the ground.   


wow   I by the time I was 19 I'd already learned that skiing had absolutely nothing to do with "running others into the ground"
 

post #67 of 85

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by newfydog View Post

 


wow   I by the time I was 19 I'd already learned that skiing had absolutely nothing to do with "running others into the ground"
 


You know what I meant newfydog.  Very few of the "younger" skiers I know can ski as long as I do or as many days consecutively.  By 2 PM most are done and I am just not ready to quit if the snow is still good and weather decent. 
 

post #68 of 85

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by JimH View Post 


  Very few of the "younger" skiers I know can ski as long as I do or as many days consecutively.  By 2 PM most are done and I am just not ready to quit if the snow is still good and weather decent. 
 

 

Good for you. That doesn't necessarily make you a stud, it may mean you ski with a less dynamic technique. We had some guy beating his chest about how he could do no training and then go ski a week solid.  The consensus was that he skis like the living dead.

 

A World Cup racer can waste his very fit legs in just a few runs of high g-force carving, while a recreational skier can skid and cruise all day without getting much exercise.

 

The thread wasn't about how tough you are, it asked what your typical ski day is like. 

 

post #69 of 85

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by volantaddict View Post

 


Me too.

 

There are quite a few days I go longer, bell to bell, and even with an OB hike afterward, but when you ski every day, there ceases to be this feeling that a ski day is an uncommon thing that must be desperately clung to, and milked dry, to the point of suffering.

 

As someone stated earlier, I count as a ski day, every day that I click in and ride.

 

I always find this topic funny when it comes up, because invariably, people who spend relatively few days on the mountain in a year attempt to assert the value of their ski year as equal or greater to those who ski much more often. That's just silly.

 

 

 



 

Me three.  Between work and family, most of my days end up being in the two to four hour range, but I have no complaints.  I am so much happier sking a little alot than alot a little.  Every day that I get to click into my bindings is so much better than a day that I don't.  Getting out with my friends, sharing the sun and the powder and the beauty of being in the mountains--along with the thrill of the sport is special regardless of how much time I can spend.  To be able to get out almost every day is just a dream for me.  Every now and again I feel a little regret when I have to head in to go back to work, but it vanishes quickly as I remind myself that I can do it all again tomorrow.

post #70 of 85

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by volantaddict View Post

 


 

As someone stated earlier, I count as a ski day, every day that I click in and ride.

 

I'm about to move into the climb to the summit for one run phase of the year. That an crust cruising. 


My days are rather varied,   Somedays I'm on waxless touring skis, breaking trail through the woods just admiring the snow.  Some days I'm on skating skis covering 50 km of spring crust above treeline.  Some days I'm riding lifts with friends from out of town and we put in a long day with lunch on the mountain.  Other times I ski from opening until the powder is chewed up---an hour if there isn't much open. 

 

I don't count how many I do, but I consider them all ski days. 
 

post #71 of 85

Every day we spend on the top side of the grass (or snow) is a good day so it's certainly not a quality issue with me. As a vacation skier I spend about the same number of days each year traveling to the ski area as I do actually skiing. Unfortunately when you add a little altitude adjustment for my old flat lander body and the occasional airline SNAFU, blizzard or whiteout I do feel the pressure to get in as much time on the hill as I can take and still enjoy the trip.

What I really like to do is get up and out earlier and work in another quick break late in the day. The family likes to sleep later, ski slower and then take only a lunch break during the day.

To answer the original question I'm the typical 9 - 4 skier but there is usually an hour for lunch and by 3 pm I'm not hitting it very hard.

About the time I adjust to the altitude and get the soreness worked out of my thighs it's time to fly home and get back to work then next month do it all over again. One of my goals in life is to get at altitude and stay at altitude long enough to acclimate PLUS give the ski muscles a few days and then see how much I want to ski when I don't feel like I must ski because I'm there.

post #72 of 85

I haven't been bell to bell for several years now. I often manage to be with companions who start late and quit early and take a long lunch. If I were skiing by myself, I'd probably try to make the first lift up and ski until my legs were about to give out. That would probably be a half hour to an hour before the last lift, most of the time.

 

That said, I can't measure the quality of a ski day by how long I was out or how many runs I took. Last time out, I was with my youngest son (19) and my oldest daughter (31). We got the typical late start (10:00) and stayed on the greens all day, because my daughter is still a newby at snowboarding. My son could have taken off and roamed the mountain, but he didn't. We all stayed together on the greens, had the best day in several years and quit at about 3:00.

 

I'd gladly put up with a little shorter day if every ski day could be as satisfying as that one.

post #73 of 85

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by newfydog View Post

 

I almost never ski past lunch. 


Don't blame you. I've skied Bachelor, and I was bored to tears by lunch too.

 

 

post #74 of 85

My shortest day this year was 19 minutes, longest 8 hours. About 6 hours is what I usually do. It depends on where I am and who I'm with. Eight hours skiing hi-speed lifts and I will need to lower myself into the car for the ride home holding onto the door frame, and lift each leg into the vehicle with my arms. For the next three days, I won't be able to sit down without holding onto something (thankfully the sink is very close to the toilet in my bathroom), but after that I'm fine!

post #75 of 85

Leave the house at 6 AM, get to Whistler at 8. Gondola opens a bit before 8:30. Ski hard, 20-30 minutes for lunch. Last lift closes at 4. Catch the last one up. Hike up to the top of the glacier. At least half an hour skiing down to the village.

 

8:20AM - 4:45PM

 

If I'm going to a closer mountain that has night skiing, I'll usually get there when they opens (9) and stay until I get hungry for dinner (around 7-8) with a short break for lunch.

 

I only get about 20 days in a year and I'll be damned if I don't get as much as possible from them. Always try to shoot for quality snow days, too. Being on a limited budget/time, I'll try to plan with the weather for A) Huge dumps, B) Bluebird skies and C) Fun, warm spring skiing.

post #76 of 85

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by iWill View Post

 


Don't blame you. I've skied Bachelor, and I was bored to tears by lunch too.

 

 


Yeah, but I grew up skiing Ohio and Western NY.  This looks just fine from that perspective.  Plus we're still open.
 

 

post #77 of 85

Usually from about 9 to 3:30ish but it depends on the conditions and what I'm skiing, 6hrs on slalom skis is hard work!

 

Since I need to go abroad to ski going from desk job to a solid week of skiing is tough on the body. I usually finish when I feel myself getting tired because that it when I will hurt myself.

post #78 of 85

Up till a couple of years it was the first chair up in the morning - and the last chair up in the afternoon. This year it was still the first chair up in the morning and I quit about 3 - 3:30 in the afternoon. Age is starting to catch up with me, I'll turn 66 this month. Also seemed like I spent more time on the blues this year with some green's thrown in late afternoon.

post #79 of 85

I fall in the camp of vertical being the measure of "how much do you ski per day."  My stats here: http://webpages.charter.net/tcrocker818/vft_seas.htm  Per day average is 19,230.  No clear trend in that over my 30 years of skiing, quite consistent. 

 

Of course it's not quite that simple.  15K of demanding ski terrain or conditions will wear anyone out more than 30K of groomers. 

 

The clear trend that I do notice is the difference between vacationers and locals.  We tourists tend to ski full days at destinations if we can, and also learn early that it may be necessary to pace oneself on a multiday trip in order to do that.  The locals ski many more days, cherry pick the timing for best conditions, ski fewer hours/vert per day unless it's really good, but are hammering pedal-to-the-metal at a pace most of us visitors can't sustain very long.

 

My 24-year-old son Adam (way better than I) is illustrative.  In 2007-08 he lived at Mammoth, skied 63 days but averaged 14K per ski day.  Now he's back in San Diego, only 20 days this season, but averaged over 21K per day.

 

post #80 of 85

I've been tracking my days and really haven't found the vert per day to track with much other than my physical capacity.  Since I moved to MT and ski more, the average number of days has been higher and the average vert skied per day has been higher as well.  The last two seasons I was recovering from injuries and did not ski as many days or as long a day.  In general, the more days I skied in a season, the longer the day was.

 

post #81 of 85
Quote:

I mean, how many time a skier would spend on an average ski day, really GOING DOWN THE SLOPES?

not in the chair, not in the lines, not eating, not waiting friends, not taking pictures...

I estimated this once for an exceptionally fast-paced day.  I was at Snowbird during the 2002 Olympics, so no lines and skiing alone, total 41,250 vertical.  Subtracting out the length of chair times from when I was on the hill came out to about 30% of the time skiing.  A more typical day, lines, eating, waiting friends, taking pictures...probably no more than 20%.

post #82 of 85

 

Quote:

Originally Posted by Tony Crocker View Post
 

... The locals ski many more days, cherry pick the timing for best conditions, ski fewer hours/vert per day unless it's really good, but are hammering pedal-to-the-metal at a pace most of us visitors can't sustain very long.

 


i agree that vert is the true measure.... and that vert on groomers doesn't count.

 

this is the first time i've ever really kept track of everything for a full season... unfortunately my season was plagued by back injury. 

 

i typically pride myself on skiing just about every day, but i missed 5 weeks this year starting on feb 12th.  after that i only really skied on the best days... hopefuly i'll be back to full-time next year.

 

i still have a few days to enter, but here are my stats (sorted by month) from skilogs.com:

 

 2009 Stats

 

i'll have 65 days at just under 27k per once i add my last few days (well below average).... i'll be looking to blow that out of the water next year.


Edited by jahroy - 5/14/2009 at 04:01 am GMT
post #83 of 85

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Tony Crocker View Post

I estimated this once for an exceptionally fast-paced day.  I was at Snowbird during the 2002 Olympics, so no lines and skiing alone, total 41,250 vertical.  Subtracting out the length of chair times from when I was on the hill came out to about 30% of the time skiing.  A more typical day, lines, eating, waiting friends, taking pictures...probably no more than 20%.


kt and headwall are 6-7 minute chair rides.... if you're bombing down them in great conditions you can do laps in 3-4 minutes (it is possible to go a little faster if you nuke it in epic snow, but an average lap is more like 5 minutes). 

 

if you're ripping laps like that all day (you'd have to be superman) you'd be spending 20-24 minutes per hour skiing, which is 33% at the worst.

 

six laps per hour on kt is hard skiing and only 60% of the time on the lift.  if you're skiing anything but light-speed all day long, you'd be getting considerably more skiing in than that. 

 

there are dozens and dozens of people here (if not way more) who spend all their time lapping those chairs...

 

my GPS will tell me how much time i spend standing around vs time spent moving.... on a good day at squaw that number can be well below an hour.


Edited by jahroy - 5/14/2009 at 04:00 am GMT
post #84 of 85

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Tony Crocker View Post

 

The clear trend that I do notice is the difference between vacationers and locals.  We tourists tend to ski full days at destinations if we can, and also learn early that it may be necessary to pace oneself on a multiday trip in order to do that.  The locals ski many more days, cherry pick the timing for best conditions, ski fewer hours/vert per day unless it's really good, but are hammering pedal-to-the-metal at a pace most of us visitors can't sustain very long.

 

 

There's some truth in that. I'll have in 80 to 90 days by the end of the season. That keeps me in better shape than the tourons who show up for their 12 each year. If you can keep up on a hard charging powder day, chance are it won't be for the whole day.

 

I can't say I've seen any evidence that the locals here ski shorter days than the tourons. In fact at the end of the day, the last ones waltzing into the beer room are the hardcorps who have just come down from skinning Mt. Yonder. Of the lift served days I've logged this season, not one started late or ended early.


 

post #85 of 85

I live in India..
In winter I live up in the snow, attend school 3 days a week and for the other 4 days, race training and other skiing stuff lol.
How I wish I live in Canada though, the snow is soooooooo much better!

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