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Patrol Rope Rescue

post #1 of 10
Thread Starter 

 

I am wondering what resources other patrollers are using for Rope Rescue? Standards, textbooks, techniques etc... let's hear it all. 

post #2 of 10

 The patrol I work on basically use 11mm static rope, rescue pulleys, webbing, 'biners, rescue 8s, jumars, and harnesses (including quick-harnesses for the rescuees).  The actual set-up used depends on - obviously - the situation.  We train in single pulley and Z-pulley retrievals, and belayed lowers and climbing. The patrol developed its procedures from standard climbing and rescue techniques.  

post #3 of 10

One book:  The Freedom of the Hills.  If it's not in there, don't try it. None of our patrollers are climbers, so there are very few rope techniques used.  But then again, our hill is so small, we never need to use them.  And then there was last night.....

 

Dean.

post #4 of 10
Thread Starter 

Dean-

 

FOTH is aimed at recreational climbers and mountaineers. It has some great advice for those groups, but is mostly not suited to organized/formal rescue teams. 

post #5 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by snoboy View Post

 

Dean-

 

FOTH is aimed at recreational climbers and mountaineers. It has some great advice for those groups, but is mostly not suited to organized/formal rescue teams. 

True enough.  But one fine day, I was out doing my morning constitutional in NH when I ran into a group that was out to practice their mountain rescue techniques.  I asked them where I could find the techniques that they used, and they told me FOTH.  The rope techniques are identical, only some of the equipment is different.
 

post #6 of 10

Rope rescue has evolved quite a bit since the last edition of FOTH

I love the book, but it is written more with self rescue and rescue of one climbing team by another, than with professional rescue in mind.

Try checking out the petzl web site... they used to have some good information on there (I can't get there from this computer, so I hope it is still ok)

 

Dedicated rescue gear and techniques tend to have a lot more redundancies in them. (among other things)

post #7 of 10
Thread Starter 

Just to clarify - I am looking for techniques and resources specific to patrolling. I already have a strong background in technical RR. I think there are some things that don't translate well though once you get into the snow environment, and am curious what other people have worked out.

 

I'm intentionally leaving the topic kind of open, but I thought I should try to focus it a bit more... 

post #8 of 10

Ok... this is pretty far beyond the scope of patrol rope rescue, but I am posting it anyway...

I was in Chamonix a few years back, and the Chamonix Alpine Rescue Team was doing an exercise (and apparently shooting some film, note the cameraman).

Their gear was incredibly cool... very dedicated.  Here is a pic:

A few notes:

On the left, you will see one guy with a small gray box.  That is a gas powered hydraulic pump.  Lines are buried under the snow and lead to the black and yellow thing you see in front of the kneeling guy on the right.  That is the hydraulic, cable based windlass system they use.  You can see the large spool of cable behind the windlass.  The guy in the rear is backing everything up and belaying using standard ropes (I assume static line).  Anchors are pre-positioned in likely accident spots.  Bolts.  They are practicing a pick-off style rescue, but are in this pic simply lowering a rescuer and one of the media guys (talking head or tv personality?)  Note that they are using what looks like PVC pipe at the edge for the cable to run over.  These are also clipped to the anchors.  You may not be able to tell, but most of the helmets had built in headsets and mikes for radio comms.  Slickest set up I have ever seen.

 

A couple more pics:

 

 

 

 

 

post #9 of 10

You might inquire as to what Bridger Bowl uses as they have had to do several.

 

FOTH is NOT your go to guide for rope rescue. There are many other courses (like Rigging for Rescue) and books out there.

 

That team you happened upon in New Hampshire is probable not a certified member team of the Mountain Rescue Association.

post #10 of 10

You might look into the APP Rope Rescue cert. & the resources they use They do appear to use FOTH among others.

 

It appears that several very credible patrols use Rescue 3 to one degree or another. My data wrt to Rescue 3 is very dated, so I can't speak directly to current status. But back in the day they were pretty much the gold standard for a number of forms of rescue training (at least among people I knew).

 

Disclaimer: I am not a patroller nor do I play one on TV. Nor do I have any current certs of any sort whatsoever (that I can remember...).

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