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Fischer progressor 9+

post #1 of 12
Thread Starter 

Me 6' 2" 240+ lbs -- I've become allergic to bathroom scales...  The ski was 175 long, 14m shovel, 18m tail, labelled as 16m.

 

The hill was groomed natural snow -- hero snow -- in the morning.  No real ice except fo the steeper sections and in between piles at the end of the day.

 

The first two runs was on an easy Blue.  The first two runs were nothing short of stunning -- in a weird way.

 

The Fischer was so easy to ski, I though I was cheating -- seriously......  remaining centered, balanced, initiating and releasing turns was trivial.... who says you can't buy a turn?  But I'm getting carried away....

 

The reviews say that the ski likes long turns.  Sure it does.  OTOH,  I found it to be an incredibly versatile ski.  This was immediately obvious -- the reviewers must have been lazy.

 

The 14m shovel initiates quickly.  If you want a tighter turn,  stay forwards. Now here is the good part.   If you want to release the turn, just move your feet ahead a couple inches, or when lazy, just allow the skis to get a touch ahead at turn completion.....   The 18m tail makes the path of the ski go straighter, while your CM crosses over instantly, since it was just being deflected by the 14m radius shovel. 

 

Transition is clean, easy and effortless -- that's why the first runs felt like cheating.... This is the only ski that I would consider putting a 3 degree side bevel due to the ease of release and the fact that the tail will not keep you in the same turn as the shovel initiated.

 

The ski is softer than the full on race ski.  It did not feel powerful at all. It did not feel weak. It did not feel nervous.

 

It did feel damp.  It is very amenable to sliding turns.  It is a tool that allows you to do anything you want -- it will respond to your inputs without hesitation. It does not force you into making any particular turn shape -- you can make any shape your heart desires.

 

The two radii also make the two-footed release or pivot slips absolutely trivial.

 

The edge grip was fine, it would be improved by my own tune - there were some nicks on these edges.  I tried to avoid skiing on the ice, because it was again too simple to ski on edge, instead, I looked for the pushed up snow on the sides of the hill to ski on.

 

It could ski any narrow trail, any steepness.  The speed control "slash turns" at the top of the steeps were easier to make than with a race SL.   I did not take it into the bumps -- I'm still to fat for that -- but due to their effortless short turns, I would bet the farm that bumps would be a heck of a lot of fun on these -- mostly because of that easy to release tail.

 

I honestly did not find a downside to this ski. It has no upper speed limit.

 

Compared to the tigershark 12ft, I would take the Fischer hands down.  On edge, the tigershark wants to make the same turn over and over again. And you have to aggressively release it.

 

Same idea with the Volklracetiger SL, but it is even more magnified for the SL.  The Volkl SL is good for about 4 runs.  Then the knees will complain.  If you are into banging out railed SL turns all day long, and have a healthy body -- especially knees, the volkl racetiger sl's should be considered.  They are truly a one trick pony.  They are actually so good at that one trick, they will force you to do that all day long. 

 

Anyway, back to the progressor.  They are excellent, non-demanding skis. They perform as asked.  If you have the chops, they will work for you.  If not, they won't kill you.  They do dislike tail pushers.  I would not call them super agile -- that is the realm of the 165 SL ski.  OTOH, they are more agile than a cheater GS ski.  If you want super agile, look elsewhere.  If you want a versatile ski that does what you say, as opposed to makes demands of you, this could be the one.

 

By far they are the easiest skis to ski I have used.  It is so easy it is almost boring... until you take the controls -- if you're asleep so are they.  If you want to ski, they will do exactly as you say.  You can ski very prettilly on these skis.  You can also charge like a wild man -- and you can slow down easily without skidding...... I really had a great day on them.

 

A comment on their "almost boring" lack of character:  The Volkl racetiger SL has a very strong character -- it wants to ski on edge.  In fact, any iota of edging and the ski wants to grab and force you up on edge.  Pivot slips/two footed releases? No. You need to be very precise.  If not, you're in a turn, much against your will.  That ski demands you ski the way it wants to run.  The Fischer skis the way you want it to ski.

 

It may find it's way into my quiver -- so far it is number one. 

 

To summarize: A very good solid damp forgiving ski that is very easy to ski.  A confidence builder.  It rewards solid movements. It does what you say, and does not complain about doing it.  No upper speed limit. Slow short turns were fine too.  A very versatile ski. What you may NOT like is it's apparent lack of character. But it does have character -- easy to initiate, easy to release.....

 

 Highly recommended.  A demo is definately in order.  If you prefer the cheater GS, the back half of  the ski is 18m.  If you want to shorten it up, the front half is 14m.  You've got a lot of really cool options between those two.

 

post #2 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by BigE View Post

Me 6' 2" 240+ lbs -- I've become allergic to bathroom scales...  The ski was 175 long, 14m shovel, 18m tail, labelled as 16m.

 

 

I honestly did not find a downside to this ski. It has no upper speed limit.

 

 

 Highly recommended.  A demo is definately in order.  If you prefer the cheater GS, the back half of  the ski is 18m.  If you want to shorten it up, the front half is 14m.  You've got a lot of really cool options between those two.

 

When you say you couldn't find a seep limit, how were you skiing? I'm looking for a ski that can make very high speed long radius turns and straight line without being overly nervous. When I replace my Volkl SS Superspeeds I'll be looking for a similar ski, like a good cheater GS ski with a little more versatility. The 9+ may fit the bill.

Your thoughts?

 


 

 

post #3 of 12
Thread Starter 

 

I don't usually "bomb the hill" -- the hill is just too small for that. I don't straightline since the runs are too short (650 foot vertical drop).  I'm sure I turn quite a bit more than you.  Which is where they really surprised me.

 

My limited flat skiing showed no sign of nervousness, unlike slalom skis, but that was done only a couple times at higher speeds.  Whenever their edges were not gripping the skis were still very stable. 

 

That being said, if 90% of your skiing is making long turns at high speeds, especially if you ignore the condition of the hill, I would not consider a 14M shovel. I looked for less deep snow when at speed, due to the 14M shovel -- it's just not that smart to ski crazy fast on a 14M shovel in deep cut-up snow.

 

If I recall correctly, the superspeeds have two thick layers of Ti.  The fischer 9+ has two also, but they are thin.  Their race skis have two but thicker. (The web site says 2 x 0.5 for the progressor vs 2 x 0.8 for the race skis, I'm guessing that 0.5/0.8 is thickness.) They are medium flexing, while I recall the SS to be very stiff.

 

I'm guessing that the closest to the SS I've skied is the Tigershark 12, which skied like a truck -- nothing bothered it.  The Fischer has more of a race-ski feel than the TS 12.

 

You may want to demo them in the 180 length.

 

Does that help?

 

Edit:  I can only guess at how fast you ski.  When I'm on the hill, I generally pass everyone, but don't feel that is fast.  It is too hard to compare.

 


Edited by BigE - Fri, 06 Feb 09 18:53:17 GMT
post #4 of 12

BigE,

Thanks for the response. When I plan a day to ski mostly groomers, about 25% of my ski days, I ski very fast although I will take a few bump runs to break up the day. I have other skis for off piste and deep days. It sounds like I should try the 9+ when I replace my Superspeeds but I may end up with a cheater GS ski.

post #5 of 12
Thread Starter 

Definately try them.  They ought to be far better in the moguls than a cheater GS.

 

post #6 of 12

I demoed this ski yesterday at Whistler. The conditions were hardpack as there hasn't been any new snow lately. I had them tuned the day before to eliminate any doubt of the skis condition.

 

35 yrs old, 5'9", 175lbs, expert.

I skied the 175cm with the plate.

 

Eric, I can assure you that this ski is extremely stable at very high speeds. As a matter of fact, I had a stern talking to by one of the 'Mountain Safety Patrol' staff at the end of the day because, according to them, i was skiing too fast!  Needless to say, i was amused and flattered :-)

 

I took them off-piste and in the bumps (not what they're designed for I know) and they were OK as long as you stay centered and on top of them.  But if you're not in attack mode this ski will throw you all around as it does not like to flex.  Still, i wasn't expecting it perform as well as it did.  This is not an off-piste ski and If you're lazy or don't have the proper technique, this ski will be a handful and not fun at all.

I thought the length would be an issue but it never felt too long as i normally ski a 170.  This ski loves speed! Super stable at high speeds, absolutely loved it! It's more of a GS type ski, yet it was pretty good at quick, short radius turns as long as you're going fast enough.  It didn't like quick turns at slower than mach 3 speeds something which the Head Magnum performed better at.

 

BigE, i don't recommend skiing the bumps with these skis unless absolutely necessary. I love skiing the bumps and I gotta say that these skis require perfect technique and even then it's a handful.

 

post #7 of 12
Thread Starter 

Now you're making me demo them again!

 

Darn! 

 

post #8 of 12

I owned the Progressor in 175cm and felt it was too short, I'm 5' 10" 225lbs. If I were to buy this ski again (I wouldn't), I would go with a 180 for sure.

post #9 of 12

BigE... That ain't so bad, afterall, it's a fantastic ski

 

The Progressor 9+ has the medal inside which obviously makes it stiff.  The 8+ is the exact same ski without the medal, it's the model i originally wanted to try but both models are impossible to find in Vancouver/Whistler. I had to go through a friend who knows the Fischer rep and even then all he had was the 9+.  All the skis here are geared for off-piste skiing/all mtn. (I already own a pair of Mantra's).

I'm looking for a pure carving/race oriented frontside ski. I figure the 8+ would be much more versatile compared to the 9+ without giving away too much of the high speed stability.

 

The other ski which I really want to demo is the Head SuperShape Speed but that too i can not find anywhere. The Head rep doesn't even have a pair! I tried the Magnum a month ago and liked it alot, didn't quite ski as fast on it but that was due to the conditions.  I have a feeling the Progressor 9+ and the SuperShape Speed are very similar in characteristics.

post #10 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by Brumos View Post

I demoed this ski yesterday at Whistler. The conditions were hardpack as there hasn't been any new snow lately. I had them tuned the day before to eliminate any doubt of the skis condition.

 

35 yrs old, 5'9", 175lbs, expert.

I skied the 175cm with the plate.

 

Eric, I can assure you that this ski is extremely stable at very high speeds. As a matter of fact, I had a stern talking to by one of the 'Mountain Safety Patrol' staff at the end of the day because, according to them, i was skiing too fast!  Needless to say, i was amused and flattered :-)

 

I took them off-piste and in the bumps (not what they're designed for I know) and they were OK as long as you stay centered and on top of them.  But if you're not in attack mode this ski will throw you all around as it does not like to flex.  Still, i wasn't expecting it perform as well as it did.  This is not an off-piste ski and If you're lazy or don't have the proper technique, this ski will be a handful and not fun at all.

I thought the length would be an issue but it never felt too long as i normally ski a 170.  This ski loves speed! Super stable at high speeds, absolutely loved it! It's more of a GS type ski, yet it was pretty good at quick, short radius turns as long as you're going fast enough.  It didn't like quick turns at slower than mach 3 speeds something which the Head Magnum performed better at.

 

BigE, i don't recommend skiing the bumps with these skis unless absolutely necessary. I love skiing the bumps and I gotta say that these skis require perfect technique and even then it's a handful.

 

Brumos,
 

Thanks, good feedback. The Progressor 9 keeps coming to the top of my list for a groomer ski to replace my Volkl Superspeeds.

 

post #11 of 12
I skied this a bunch last spring, including a few days where I was skiing close to full speed and my leg wasn't hurting.  At my weight, 150lbs or so, it was a bit stiff in 175cm, but just a blast at full speed on groomers. More energy than the typical GS racecarver, but just as stable, although more fun. For full-on high-speed GS ripping, I would prefer the 175cm, but at 5 foot 9, the 170cm is more versatile. Compared to the Dynastar 4x4, I found the Progressor to be slightly stiffer and more of a power feel, while the 4x4 is a touch softer and more manageable in varous conditions.  For pure edgehold and power on frozen courdoroy at 8am, I would take the Progressor, and for moderately variable snow, the 4x4.  I suspect that heavier skiers might find the 9+ a bit softer and more forgiving, but it is still a stiff ski for someone of my weight, which really only has a downside if you are skiing bumps and need a softer ski.
post #12 of 12
I don't know if I can add a whole lot, but I like these.  A lot.  If I end up buying a new pair of skis at the end of this season to replace my 2007-2008 Dynastar Contact LTDs, it will probably be these (unless I stumble across something else I like even more this year).

The Progressor 9+ is the most stable thing I've ever skied at speed that isn't a full-blown race ski.  I couldn't find a speed limit on it either.  And it's WAY more forgiving than any race stock, and still behaves nicely at low speeds.
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