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What's the most important thing to learn in skiing?

post #1 of 40
Thread Starter 
O.k.,
what do you think the most important thing to learn in ski technique is and how do you teach it? Is there a single thing you could pick out or do you have to go with a group of skills?
post #2 of 40
2 things> Core stabilization, and how to use your feet properly.
post #3 of 40
So Tog,
So we are to go deeper here than just having fun by not falling down, huh?

I'll open this can of worms with my personal cornerstone:

Ability to initiate movements from the feet supported by an keen awareness of the range of cause and effect avaliable from foot movements. [img]graemlins/thumbsup.gif[/img]

Learn it by focus, intent, experimentation, paying attention, and having fun by not falling down.

I'd even go so far as to suggest that other things gain importance by inverse proportion to this skills absence.
[img]graemlins/evilgrin.gif[/img]

[ March 12, 2003, 11:55 AM: Message edited by: Arcmeister ]
post #4 of 40
Quote:
Originally posted by Arcmeister:
So Tog,
So we are to go deeper here than just having fun by not falling down, huh?

I'll open this can of worms with my personal cornerstone:

Ability to initiate movements from the feet supported by an keen awareness of the range of cause and effect avaliable from foot movements. [img]graemlins/thumbsup.gif[/img]

I'd even go so far as to suggest that other things gain importance by inverse proportion to this skills absence.
[img]graemlins/evilgrin.gif[/img]
Of course. But do you realize how few recreational skiers, other than epicski participants, of course are aware of this?

When I ask this ame question of participants in my ski conditioning class, guess what their answer is?
post #5 of 40
Quote:
Originally posted by Arcmeister:
So Tog,
So we are to go deeper here than just having fun by not falling down, huh?

I'll open this can of worms with my personal cornerstone:

Ability to initiate movements from the feet supported by an keen awareness of the range of cause and effect avaliable from foot movements. [img]graemlins/thumbsup.gif[/img]

I'd even go so far as to suggest that other things gain importance by inverse proportion to this skills absence.
[img]graemlins/evilgrin.gif[/img]
I'll second Arcmeister's thoughts. But that's no huge surprise since I spent four days at the Academy with Arcmeister beginning to understand movements with my feet, and then about thirty days on the snow since the Academy almost reinventing my skiing by practicing and gaining a deeper awareness of those movements. Maybe it really is all about placing your focus "back to the feet."

cheers,
stmbtres
post #6 of 40
Holy Pilates, Batman! Before I got a chance to post "quiet upper body" and "ski with your legs", Lisamarie came in with "core stabilization" and "how to use your feet properly". Much better.
post #7 of 40
NUMBER 1

Keep yourself committed DOWN THE HILL!

CalG
post #8 of 40
Dynamic Anticipation.

Without it you are not skiing, you are just sliding on skis.

Mark

[ March 12, 2003, 01:07 PM: Message edited by: Maddog1959 ]
post #9 of 40
What is the most important thing to learn in skiing? Having a sense of humor and joy about one's learning.
post #10 of 40
One word answer: Balance
post #11 of 40
Quote:
Originally posted by Arcmeister:
So Tog,
So we are to go deeper here than just having fun by not falling down, huh?

I'll open this can of worms with my personal cornerstone:

Ability to initiate movements from the feet supported by an keen awareness of the range of cause and effect avaliable from foot movements. [img]graemlins/thumbsup.gif[/img]

Learn it by focus, intent, experimentation, paying attention, and having fun by not falling down.

I'd even go so far as to suggest that other things gain importance by inverse proportion to this skills absence.
[img]graemlins/evilgrin.gif[/img]
Hmmm, not sure a 7 yr old would comprehend that?
only kiddin, but is it really that complex?
post #12 of 40
No, actually it is that simple, it only gets more complex as your focus and intent strays further from your feet.

And kids, more easily than many adults, quickly grasp and learn to just do with their feet whatever they want their skis to do.
post #13 of 40
What is the most important aspect in skiing? Balance! WVSkier hit it right on. Then LM hit the next important aspect, feet. Everything must start at the feet. How that occurs will probably be open for debate, but not here.

Contrary to what some think, balance can be learned by the student, not taught by the teacher. The teacher can only guide, with a variety of tasks.
post #14 of 40
Thread Starter 
So could we even simplify this "movements at the feet" to say that the release move is the most important?

Quote:
I spent four days at the Academy with Arcmeister beginning to understand movements with my feet, and then about thirty days on the snow since the Academy almost reinventing my skiing by practicing and gaining a deeper awareness of those movements. - stmbtres
How's the stance?
post #15 of 40
in my very brief experience, each revelation leads to the next thing to be discovered. right now, balance over the skis, and keeping that balance throughout turns and through different terrain is my revelation.

thing is, it sounds obvious. but just as skiing gets "smaller" the more i do it (fine movements of feet in boots, vs. BIG input of thighs, etc.), so do the subtle intricacies of balance reveal themselves.

when i am centered over the skis, the skis are more likely to "follow" me in my dance.
post #16 of 40
I'll admit I'm stealing this straight from Lito's books, but it works for me:

Ski with your feet, balance with your hands.
post #17 of 40
Quote:
Originally posted by Tog:
So could we even simplify this "movements at the feet" to say that the release move is the most important?

Not sure I'd be willing to say that, but smarter minds than mine might prevail. I find that progressively edging throughout the turn, again originating with movements at the feet, is also very important.

</font><blockquote>quote:</font><hr />I spent four days at the Academy with Arcmeister beginning to understand movements with my feet, and then about thirty days on the snow since the Academy almost reinventing my skiing by practicing and gaining a deeper awareness of those movements. - stmbtres
How's the stance?

Why don't you come out to Steamboat for some Spring skiing and see for yourself. [img]smile.gif[/img]
</font>[/quote]
post #18 of 40
Doesn't the answer to this question depend on who you are teaching and how much experience your student has had?
post #19 of 40
Right foot point right go right, left foot point left go left and always move forward.

Everything else about skiing can be discovered from that starting point.

Yd
post #20 of 40
Thread Starter 
Yeah that's a pretty good one. Sno'more we're trying to get it down to one thing, no matter what. (I know you might say that one needs studded snow tires to get to the mountain )
post #21 of 40
Balance, for the use of.

at ALL levels!
post #22 of 40
Do not write checks your body cannot cash.

Do the right dance for the music.

Newton's Laws.

Glide.

Swing.

Dive and believe!

Humans are hard-wired for skiing. It comes naturally.

Reminds me of what Curly said about the secret to happiness: There's only ONE thing--the trouble is it's different for everyone. Fun topic though, people are workin' it.
post #23 of 40
Groov'n with gravity........
post #24 of 40
Quote:
Originally posted by Tog:
O.k.,
what do you think the most important thing to learn in ski technique is and how do you teach it? Is there a single thing you could pick out or do you have to go with a group of skills?
"Go with the glide"

If you go with the glide you can always tell the glide where to go.

How I teach it depends on who I'm skiing with
post #25 of 40
Well, here we go again, Roto . . . "Go with the glide" and "tell the glide where to go" sounds a whole lot like "Ski the slow line as fast as you can, when you can".
post #26 of 40
Although everyone gave good answers, most answers address the finer points of skiing. Most answers do not apply to the people that need to learn the basics.

Perhaps I am too practical, but when I look around the hill, I mostly see people in the backseat fighting to turn the ski or afraid to release out of the current turn. To these people balance, core stability, intent, quiet upper body, ski with your legs, be committed down the hill, dynamic anticipation, etc, means nothing.

The single best answer I heard so far is the release. This would help a beginner get out of the current turn.

But based on what I see out there, learning to stay out of the backseat and keeping the ski tips engaged and functional is the most important. Release is next. Bye the way, when I say "learn to stay out of the backseat" I don't mean for-aft balance. I mean getting over the fear to engage those tips and realize that once you do that the ski almost turns by itself.
post #27 of 40
The other Bob Barnes (Winter Park) 6 fundamentals

1. A balanced stance

2. Control the skis with feet and legs

3. Balanced on or against the outside ski

4. Progressive connected movements

5. Disciplined upper body

6. Tip and control turns with the inside ski
post #28 of 40
See my tag line
post #29 of 40
I like the other Bob's list very much and droldman's tagline is very good too.

All this stuff is good; it makes me grateful that we are allowed to learn more than one thing!

But having thought it through now, I'd like to say that the one thing is GO.
post #30 of 40
POWDER [img]graemlins/thumbsup.gif[/img]
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