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desperately seeking ski instructor courses. - Page 2

post #31 of 45
In addition to that last comment, the question Cheeky asked was, "Where can I take a course to pass my Level I PSIA-Certification", not his PMTS certification. Until this past year, I had not even heard of PMTS, all the concepts have been around for a very long time, and many of which, also, have been implemented into PSIA and ski school's teaching strategy.

I think that anything new that can assist new skiers in learning to ski is wonderful. But, let's face facts, if you want to win the presidency, you don't run on the Libertarian ticket, even though the concepts and ideals might be great. PSIA is hardly perfect, but it is the main game in town. Period.
post #32 of 45
One of the best deals in learning to be a ski instructor is the "Learn to be a Ski Professional" course the first week of December at Killington. It is taught by PSIA-E examinars, and it is specifically to teach you to be a beginning ski instructor. At $359 for 5 hours of on snow instruction per day for 5 days, it is the best bargan in ski instruction that I know of for someone who is not a member of PSIA. If you are a member of PSIA-E the best bargan I know of is the "Sno-Pro Jam" which is the second week of December.

http://www.killington.com/html/Learn...l#professional
post #33 of 45
Mike Dempsey runs programs in Whistler and Fernie that include preparation for CSIA 1 (3 weeks) and CSIA 2 (a further 2 weeks). Prices include group housing accomodation. See the Dempsey website at
http://www.dempseytours.com/dempseyweb.htm for details. When I did the Dempsey ski improvement program this year 100% of those taking the ski to instructor level passed CSIA 1 and about 50-60% passed the CSIA 2.

The instruction is excellent, all CSIA level 4 coaches, although you have to accept the course teaches the Canadian style and system.
post #34 of 45
The program at Killington is outstanding. They offer successful candidates jobs.

In PSIA-E they now have something called "First Tracks" that you have to go to. It's a 2-day event, then the real exam is one day. Here is a link to the certification standards:

http://www.psia-e.com/education/general/certstan.htm
post #35 of 45
Sometimes the difference in PSIA divisions can be advantageous! When I did my level II exam in Colorado, I was still a member of PSIA-Eastern.

After I passed, I transferred my membership to Rocky Mountain, however I am also still a member of eastern division until renewals in June.

So I got a badge from Rocky Mountain...and I didn't much care for the style of it, it's skinnier and has a white/silver band across the top. However, since I was an Eastern member when I did the exam, they had to send my certificate and badge. It just arrived today! And I'm happy to find the badge is the classic sort, big and fat and plain.

But the best thing is, their version of PSIA reads "professional ski instrucTOR of America" wheras the RM one has instrucTORS in the plural.
I'm just sitting here admiring it actually!
(such a fashion victim).
post #36 of 45
Ant, that pluralization has not been without controversy. Additionally, most tip toe around the subject, but...there exists significant standard differences between divisions. No one wants to hear that, but... Anyway, one of the reasons RM does that is to make damn certain the distinction is there...for better or worse (I think they are a might narrow too).
By the way...you can be a dual member (only if you like the relative benefits), I am in RM and West.
Anyway, stick the one they "awarded" in yer sock drawer or give it to Mum for safe keeping...never leave your original laying buried in some ski school yard for eternity...then again, you'll be sure to replace it next season!
post #37 of 45
Originally posted by Robin:
... most tip toe around the subject, but...there exists significant standard differences between divisions. No one wants to hear that, but... Anyway, one of the reasons RM does that is to make damn certain the distinction is there...for better or worse (I think they are a might narrow too).

I hear you! I did my level 1 in East last season...the examiner was a good friend, and I gave him a right ear-bashing afterwards, the gist of which was "what do you have to do to fail?"! Actually I monstered him all through the exam, he wanted me to dumb my teaching down to the standard required, and I got a tad angry.

I see on the cover of the PSIA mag that the Utah division seems to have a little band over the top of their badges, too. I prefer the fat badge.

It's kind of weird that my certificate says Eastern division, even though the exam was in Colorado. I think they should look at this kind of anomaly.

Anyway, stick the one they "awarded" in yer sock drawer or give it to Mum for safe keeping...never leave your original laying buried in some ski school yard for eternity...then again, you'll be sure to replace it next season!

oh ha ha! I honestly don't think I could tackle the bumps they do in Level III...unless there had been a snowfall. Soft bumps are fine anytime. I have a lot of learning to do before I could think about III. Really don't think I'll ever be that standard.

My treasured bronze badge disappeared from my jacket one lesson, but i had a notion where it might have been and sure enough, there it was, lying in the snow. I shall be wearing the Eastern fat badge next season, and I think you can replace those easily enough.

And it looks as though I shall be division-hopping again. Got a very nice email from Deer Valley today.
post #38 of 45
cheeky:

I would do some checking around. There are a few things in your post that just don't seem possible.

Remember, if things seem too good to be true; they probably are. The comment on taking the L-2 exam during your first year of hire for instance. You have to get through the mountains course to begin teaching, satisfy the hour requirement for instruction, take the L-1 .......... and then take a two part exam for L-2, that if you are LUCKY is given at your area. Many fail the L-2 first time and rely on a series of events or clinics to get a pass. IMHO, that is a very full platter for a single season. I would read the PSIA requirements for each level that are on the web site.

Make a few calls to a few SSD's and find out if they have a program for "imports" such as your self. It sounds like the "agency" is getting a cut of $ to do what you might be able to do on your own.

Our hill brought in a pack from Argentina, paid em, and I think gave them room and board. These kids could hardly ski beyond level 3/4.
post #39 of 45
Quote:
Originally posted by yuki:
Our hill brought in a pack from Argentina, paid em, and I think gave them room and board. These kids could hardly ski beyond level 3/4.
I can top that. My first job was in southern vermont (luckily Todd's gone off). They imported me and some others with no idea of our skiing ability, we'd never taught before.

But it got better, there was a busload of South African kids also brought in. They'd never even SEEN snow. And they were going to be ski/board "pros".

Our 5 days training in how to teach consisted of the trainer teaching this lot how to ski, and us observing his teaching method! (actually he was great, a bit of a kid, but he rose to the challenge mightily, and boy could he ski).
post #40 of 45
ant: The Argens developed quite nicely but those early days were rough.

I guess old line about politics and sausage applies; if you saw it being made, you'd never eat it. Ski instructors too!
post #41 of 45
If you want to head down under check out

www.rookieacademy.co.nz

the pound goes a long way in NZ, one pound is about $3.30 NZD. I don't know if these guys are PMTS, PSIA or whatever. Ant can vouch for Garrett, he taught him at Keystone this year.
post #42 of 45
Gawd, that's a terrible website!
The Rookie Academy was attended by quite a few foreigners and US-ites from Keystone, and they all had glowing words for it.
I think there is some kind of connection between Keystone and the Academy.

Garrett is pretty well across PSIA requirements as he was our main trainer this season...although there's something funny with our basic parallel technique, me and quite a few others scored very low on that in our exams.

He complained endlessly about not being able to take one ski off when doing one-footed skiing, I found it handy to be able to drop the tail and cheat.
post #43 of 45
Ant, your post about the South Africans was very funny, I loved it!
post #44 of 45
It was all TROO! Coming from Oz, where to be an instructor first you MUST be able to ski half decently, we were in shock.

I sometimes wonder if a certain large resort company based in CO will in the near future do something similar, involving citizens of a country directly south of the US and ski school jackets.
post #45 of 45
Ant, PM coming at ya!
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