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Are my bindings messed up?

post #1 of 13
Thread Starter 

At a ski trip about two weeks ago I had a pretty bad fall where my ski didnt come off and I twisted my knee a little bit; wasnt too bad - I walked funny about two days and then it was okay. I feel its about 95% healed by now.

 

But that got me quite scared (I screamed out in pain when I fell) and started going through some binding checks.

 

I found this website : http://www.ski-injury.com/prevention/st

 

after trying their test I realized I could indeed twist out of both toepieces but it took a HUGE effort; and whats even worse is that one ski took noticibly more effort than the other. I even switched legs and tried again thinking maybe my left leg is weaker but it is definitely the ski. I double checked the forward pressure indicator and it is fine on both skis.

 

On the heel release test I couldnt do it at all, I had to move down to about a DIN 5 from 6.5 to be able to release my heels the way they describe, but at least on the heels both skis released at what felt like the same ammount of effort.

 

What should I do? I mean a shop set them and everything, so I am wary of just going to a another shop and asking them to check my bindings (even though I feel something is fishy with them) because what is to say they wont just do the same thing and charge me $40 for it. Should I just set my toepiece DINs to what feels like equal effort? I would have to run one toe piece at about 6 while I run the other at 5.

Usual DIN chart setting for my height/weight/boot length and skier ability (II) is 6.5.

Also the toepiece which is harder to release has a considerable wobble when I move it with my hand (something like a mm of wobble)

 

edit: I forgot to mention Skis are Volkl Supersport Allstars with Marker Motion iPT 12 bindings


Edited by Babak - Sat, 31 Jan 09 19:34:25 GMT
post #2 of 13

Go back to a shop and ask for a skier level I setting.

post #3 of 13

Current bindings do not protect knees when set at the proper DIN.  Don't expect them to unless they are set hopelessly too low (in which case prerelease is a bigger problem that probably will lead to knee injuries).

post #4 of 13
Thread Starter 

What the? Isnt that the whole point of bindings? To make sure I dont destroy my knee when I fall?

 

So are you saying that if I set them to the level suggested when I do the self-test on that website it would be too low and dangerous.

 

Comprex: I actually used to ski at Type I settings until a few weeks ago, but I started prereleasing when skiing over any sort of cruddy snow so I upped it a bit.

post #5 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by Babak View Post

What the? Isnt that the whole point of bindings? To make sure I dont destroy my knee when I fall?

post #6 of 13

Obviously I haven't figured this site out yet. Anyway, the answer to your question is; no. The binding is not designed to protect your knee when you fall. It's designed to keep you from snapping your leg when you fall. They try with teh other part, but that is a known problem.

post #7 of 13

Right, current binding technology just tries to make sure you don't snap your leg off at the top of the boot (which can still happen).  

post #8 of 13

Skiing is dangerous. If you set your bindings DIN to low and you will get hurt. The worst fall I have had was because the binding released in heavy snow. It basically yanked my right ski off at about 25mph. I paid for that for a couple of weeks. Leave your bindings where they are unless you are a level 1 skier.

 

Bryan

post #9 of 13

If one feels different from the other, maybe there is a problem with them. It wouldn't hurt to take them to a shop for a release test. 

post #10 of 13

On the Tyrolia Certification progeam they talk about torque testing bindings.  I would take the skis to a very reputable shop and state your concerns that one seems to be harder to torque than the other.  It will not hurt to do this.

 

As an aside.  I have five pair of race skis in my home.  Three I mounted and two were mounted at two differnet verty reputabe shops.  One had the race plate mounted off center and the otehr was mounted too small for the boot (as in wrong). 

 

Shops can make mistakes the same as anyone else.  Never hurts to have things double checked.  It is you or your family skiing - be safe.

 

Mike

post #11 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by mikehoyt View Post

As an aside.  I have five pair of race skis in my home.  Three I mounted and two were mounted at two differnet verty reputabe shops.  One had the race plate mounted off center and the otehr was mounted too small for the boot (as in wrong). 

 

Shops can make mistakes the same as anyone else.  Never hurts to have things double checked.  It is you or your family skiing - be safe.

 

Mike

I'd be so irate!

Specially if the ski's were $700+ on the price tag.

post #12 of 13

If both bindings are set to the same DIN value, they should both release with the same amount of torque.  If they do not, something is wrong.  Take them to a reputable shop and have them torque tested.  Tell them in advance why you are having them tested.  If they confirm your suspicions and reset the bindings bring your bill to the original shop and complain quietly at a busy time of day.  If they give you any guff complain loudlly.

post #13 of 13

Bindings should be set to release before they seriously hurt you.  You may be willing to accept some hurt in exchange for keeping your skis attached if you are skiing at speeds where loosing your skis would result in a higher probability of serious injury or death from not having them on and going into the trees, rocks, etcetera.

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