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Powder on bumps (video) - Page 2

post #31 of 39

I agree about not wanting too much shin pressure. Pressuring your boot tongues with your shins makes you squat too low. This position doesn't allow you enough room to absorb the mogul and knocks you into the backseat. You must stand tall in the bumps and use ankle flex to push your toes down along with your tips over the mogul. This is key to control and speed control. By this I don't mean no pressure as there has to be some. Be careful of too much.

post #32 of 39

Tdk6, you've received good feetback here, so I'll touch on something that hasn't been mentioned. 

 

 You're getting launched and losing contact with the snow in most these turns.  Not necessarily wrong, but there is another way.  That launching causes you to compress when you touch back down in the shallow between bumps.  Thus you have less ability to absorb the next bump and you launch again,,, and the cycle continues.  Suck up the first bump strongly,,, extend as you go into the next shallow,,, stay connected to the snow on the back side of the bump,,, end up long legged in the shallow,,, and suck it up again.  

 

 

post #33 of 39

Yup, Stand tall

 

Know who first gave me that tip?

 

Glen Plake

 

Absorb the bump and then get out of the chair and stand up.

post #34 of 39
Thread Starter 

Thanks for your feedback Rick. Yes, you are right. The problem I found though was that when I ski heavy deep snow like this with bumps underneath I really could not extend properly into the valleys on the back side of the bumps since that would have created too much friction on my ski tips and it would have thrown me over the handelbars. Too little for aft stability with such short skis. I opted for staying flexed longer and extended only very late. Sometimes that backfired like when I got a face shot but all in all I felt more in controll like that. But you are correct, extend into the throughs and flex at the bumps. Annother thing is that maybe you notissed that I skied quite slow and my skis came out of the snow frequently. At the time of the run I felt like in slow motion. The pich of the slope, snow, equipment and technique did not really make a perfect match then or maybe ever :).

post #35 of 39

Could you expand a little on the unlocking of the hips. Not sure I understand what you mean.

 

I feel in watching you ski this you keep you self a little hunched over at the waist area and I call that locked hips because it does not allow you to fully extend. It really is the pelvic tilted and staying tilt that does the legs to lengthening from turn to turn. You want an athletic stance that is dynamic and not locked in any one position. While your legs are flexing and lengthening some the range of motion seems reduced due to the hips never letting go of the bent position.

 

A drill to try is skiing with both poles in your inside arm extended out and try passing them behind your back at turn initiation. This will force your hips up and over your feet as you move more directly into your turn.

 

Good luck


Edited by Todo - Thu, 05 Feb 09 02:08:28 GMT
post #36 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by Todo View Post

Could you expand a little on the unlocking of the hips. Not sure I understand what you mean.

 

I feel in watching you ski this you keep you self a little hunched over at the waist area and I call that locked hips because it does not allow you to fully extend. It really is the pelvic tilted and staying tilt that does the legs to lengthening from turn to turn. You want an athletic stance that is dynamic and not locked in any one position. While your legs are flexing and lengthening some the range of motion seems reduced due to the hips never letting go of the bent position.

 

A drill to try is skiing with both poles in your inside arm extended out and try passing them behind your back at turn initiation. This will force your hips up and over your feet as you move more directly into your turn.

 

Good luck


Edited by Todo - Thu, 05 Feb 09 02:08:28 GMT


 

No offense, but I'd like to see you try this in the steep big bumps covered in powder that TDK was skiing in.

post #37 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lars View Post
Quote:
Originally Posted by Todo View Post

Could you expand a little on the unlocking of the hips. Not sure I understand what you mean.

 

I feel in watching you ski this you keep you self a little hunched over at the waist area and I call that locked hips because it does not allow you to fully extend. It really is the pelvic tilted and staying tilt that does the legs to lengthening from turn to turn. You want an athletic stance that is dynamic and not locked in any one position. While your legs are flexing and lengthening some the range of motion seems reduced due to the hips never letting go of the bent position.

 

A drill to try is skiing with both poles in your inside arm extended out and try passing them behind your back at turn initiation. This will force your hips up and over your feet as you move more directly into your turn.

 

Good luck


Edited by Todo - Thu, 05 Feb 09 02:08:28 GMT


 

No offense, but I'd like to see you try this in the steep big bumps covered in powder that TDK was skiing in.

 

a) I don't think Todo meant for TDK6 to do that in the bumps, but to get the idea for the movement and then take it to the bumps.

 

b) I'm pretty sure that Todd could do that in the conditions we are looking at. Maybe you could too. Sometimes these things aren't as hard as they sound.

post #38 of 39

No offense taken.... That was meant for a groomer to get the feel of unlocking the hips and moving from turn to turn with extension.

 

However skiing the bumps with no poles is a great way to improve your bump skiing. Bumps with powder are a great challenge on balance but at least the mistake results in a soft landing!

post #39 of 39

Todo, I do it all the time. In fact, when I'm skiing alone, I very seldom use poles at all. Not so much in the bumps though. I don't work on anything in the bumps other than ripping them.

 

I've posted here many times over the years that everyone should ditch their poles from time to time. It's a great way to improve your skiing. It's also alot of fun.

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