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Question about Din settings . . .

post #1 of 23
Thread Starter 
Okay, hope this one doesn't get me voted off the island.

I know Din settings are just a starting point. But, in using them as a starting point, I have a question about the weight to use. My weight is right smack on the borderline - one lb more than my usual a.m. weight, and I move into a new bracket.

So, the question: are the weights supposed to be fully geared up or are they -- how should I say this -- ungeared? I.e., my morning, when I first get out of the shower, before I dress weight?

With full gear (especially boots), I'd probably be a good 5 lbs more. Easily into the next bracket on the chart.

Just asking . . .
post #2 of 23
I'd go for a "with clothes" weight. After all, why would they use a weight that has absolutely no relation to the use of the bindings?
CW :-)

PS I'm still using about 1/2 your weight in stones (14lbs=1stone) + 0.5 DIN as a guide figure. Maybe it's different nowadays?
post #3 of 23
It's not about just weight. It is also your ability level and BSL,Boot Sole Length. I weight 180 and am 56 y.o. my DIN is 6. Do I ski on that setting. HELL NO! Mine are set at 9 and I could go to 10 prolly without injury. If your a smooove skier the DIN does not need to be cranked up to 12 or 15. Except in certain cases.
post #4 of 23
Yep. I weight in at 210lbs and set my DIN at 10, so your "half your weight in stone + 0.5" might be a tad light-on.

When I first started I was told to begin at 7, so that may be where your 'rule of thumb' comes from, but as you begin to stretch your limits you'll probably need to go higher on the DIN.
post #5 of 23
The weight is YOUR weight, not the weight of your gear. AFAIK, t's supposed to mean something about the strength of your body, not how much clothing you wear.
post #6 of 23
Your strength is based on how much weight your legs have to carry, so fully dressed.
post #7 of 23
How much they carry before they snap.

If I put on 100 pounds of blubber, should I increase my DIN? Nothing about my leg strenght or ligaments have changed......why would I expect them to be able to safely handle the much increased DIN setting? Twisting out is weight independent.....
post #8 of 23
Well that's the way it works the DIN calculator just asks how much you weigh, what your boot sole length is, and what risk level you're willing to accept, not how much of your weight is fat. 300 lb fat people have to carry that weight around all day. The get stronger legs doing that.
post #9 of 23
Most fat-asses have pretty strong legs..so even if you gain 100lbs and dont work out, provided you are doing what you always did, your legs will be stronger...they need to be to support your lard.
post #10 of 23
There is no meaningful "rule of thumb". Other than the appropriate DIN charts. Some choose, based on experience and individual circumstance, to slide up or down a bit. Hopefully in a reasoned manner...

As touched on above, the "official" setting depends on height, weight, age, skier type and BSL. Interestingly, your DIN goes up as your BSL shrinks -- so every now and again you can have a light person with tiny feet at a DIN similar to a larger person with large feet...

As for the specific weight question - take your pick. I'd bump it up, but the specifications are reasonably "flexible" anyway.
post #11 of 23
That fat people have stronger legs is a myth -- I know that first hand. My legs did NOT get stronger as I grew in size.
post #12 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by JDGin View Post
Okay, hope this one doesn't get me voted off the island.

I know Din settings are just a starting point. But, in using them as a starting point, I have a question about the weight to use. My weight is right smack on the borderline - one lb more than my usual a.m. weight, and I move into a new bracket.

So, the question: are the weights supposed to be fully geared up or are they -- how should I say this -- ungeared? I.e., my morning, when I first get out of the shower, before I dress weight?

With full gear (especially boots), I'd probably be a good 5 lbs more. Easily into the next bracket on the chart.

Just asking . . .
I wouldn't worry too much about it....always better to err on the conservative (read: lower) DIN. If you find yourself prereleasing bump it up.
post #13 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by Richie-Rich View Post
I wouldn't worry too much about it....always better to err on the conservative (read: lower) DIN. If you find yourself prereleasing bump it up.
Naw, just crank em up to 30. Thats what I do.
post #14 of 23
Here's a din Chart from this website.
Select the link for details on how skier level affects the setting. It's not as black and white as your weight alone. You move up a code depending on whether you're an intermediate or advanced skier. In my opinion, these values must be conservative to account for the safety of the majority of people; weak and strong alike. No problem erring on the low side as a starting point as richie rich suggested.


http://www.terrymorse.com/ski/din.html
post #15 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rise To The Top View Post
Naw, just crank em up to 30. Thats what I do.
You should just screw your boots to the skis.....save you money and a lot of weight!
post #16 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by Richie-Rich View Post
You should just screw your boots to the skis.....save you money and a lot of weight!
I was thinking about that, but there were a few issues that can't really be worked out, one being how to get the boot off easily from ski to ski, and how to get the boot on inside without screwing (lol) my skis up.
post #17 of 23
The weight, height and age questions are to get a (rough) estimate of the breaking strain of your legs. The boot sole length is there to take into account of the length of the lever trying to break your legs. And the skier type is whether you would err on the side of retention or release.

But I am familiar with the vagaries of the DIN table, i am sure some mathematically minded person could convert the table into some sort of linear equation to get a smooth transition rather than jumping from one category or another.

I am aware of the sort of jumps based on the tables. My calculated setting is 8, but if I were to gain 5lbs I would be in the next weight category and my setting would go to 9.5. So I generally ski 8.5 to 9.
post #18 of 23
Thread Starter 
Gawd this is a great forum! You all are too much fun to hang out with. I love the answers, even if, as I suspected, there really isn't one.
post #19 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by Richie-Rich View Post
You should just screw your boots to the skis.....save you money and a lot of weight!
No Richie, he skis on Markers so they pre-release at 30 DIN anyway
post #20 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by Richie-Rich View Post
You should just screw your boots to the skis.....save you money and a lot of weight!
I saw a tv show where some very,very poor skiers in the mountains in India were doing that. Actually in a Warren Miller flick I think there were skiers rockin' in just plain old rubber boots screwed to the ski. Just whatever works for you. Use the old Salomon E trick..boot in binding,screw up rear adjustment. They won't come off. Get some of the plugs they use for the Salomons for monoskis. They don't release.
post #21 of 23
Back when it was first made the table made sense, now with computers everywhere you look, they should dig up the fit functions and post them somewhere. A binding spring is a smooth function and doesn't need to jump from 7 to 8; you could set it at 7.25 and a hiar.

Quote:
Originally Posted by kiwiski View Post
The weight, height and age questions are to get a (rough) estimate of the breaking strain of your legs. The boot sole length is there to take into account of the length of the lever trying to break your legs. And the skier type is whether you would err on the side of retention or release.

But I am familiar with the vagaries of the DIN table, i am sure some mathematically minded person could convert the table into some sort of linear equation to get a smooth transition rather than jumping from one category or another.

I am aware of the sort of jumps based on the tables. My calculated setting is 8, but if I were to gain 5lbs I would be in the next weight category and my setting would go to 9.5. So I generally ski 8.5 to 9.
post #22 of 23

OP,

   'DIN weight' is your 'out of the shower weight'. The chart is based on bone density/ body mass studies (putting on a heavy coat won't affect this now, will it?), if you think "adding 5 pounds kicks me up a category" then you are using the chart wrong. If your weight and height don't fall in the same row then you use the upper (lighter) row, the opposite is NOT true, you never move DOWN the chart, only up... so a few 'extra pounds' don't move you. Get it?

 

That's the answer.

post #23 of 23

the chart is a guide, ski on the lowest setting that you can without skiing out of them. I ski on a 7-8 a freind who is the same size and skis where I do etc skiis out of anything under 9. I can actually twist out of my bindings standing in the lift line but haven't prereleased since a Salomon 444....

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