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Getting skis on edge

post #1 of 33
Thread Starter 
There are times when I feel like I'm on my edges, but many times I just feel like I'm faking it....a) what's the best way to get my skis on edge and b) how do I know I'm doing it when it happens?!
post #2 of 33
I watched some video's on carving, and that really helped me just turn them on their edges easily.
Just have to use your knees and your legs, tilt your knee's the way you want to go and keep them bent so they will just rotate in.
that's how it feels in my book. Made it a lot easier for me to turn.

You can practice setting your edge with your knees by sliding down a groomed slope and tipping your knees into the hill and feeling them bite in. then release and and do it again.
Try it both ways. I could be giving horrible info, but i hope not.

I just know while turning, face down the fall line, don't swing your hips or your body, use your legs to turn, let the ski's do the work.
post #3 of 33
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Talyn View Post
I watched some video's on carving, and that really helped me just turn them on their edges easily.
Just have to use your knees and your legs, tilt your knee's the way you want to go and keep them bent so they will just rotate in.
that's how it feels in my book. Made it a lot easier for me to turn.

You can practice setting your edge with your knees by sliding down a groomed slope and tipping your knees into the hill and feeling them bite in. then release and and do it again.
Try it both ways. I could be giving horrible info, but i hope not.

I just know while turning, face down the fall line, don't swing your hips or your body, use your legs to turn, let the ski's do the work.
This might sound funny, but I feel like I might tip over when I'm truly on edge.
post #4 of 33
Quote:
Originally Posted by swisstrader View Post
This might sound funny, but I feel like I might tip over when I'm truly on edge.
I feel like that. I have trouble trusting that the edge is going to dig in and hold.
post #5 of 33
Quote:
Originally Posted by swisstrader View Post
This might sound funny, but I feel like I might tip over when I'm truly on edge.
Tip over uphill (to the right if you're on your right edges)?

Edge engagement should begin with tipping at the ankles, then the knees and finally by forming angles at the waist so the pelvis moves inside the feet while the torso remains upright. If you tilt from the top down instead, you well could tip over.
post #6 of 33
Moving the CoM into the turn and getting the outside ski on edge early will help your balancing act. Then move along the travel path of the skis and pressure/edge. With time you can carve skis even inverted to the fall line. With practice you are able to change the radius and direction at will.
post #7 of 33
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kneale Brownson View Post
Tip over uphill (to the right if you're on your right edges)?

Edge engagement should begin with tipping at the ankles, then the knees and finally by forming angles at the waist so the pelvis moves inside the feet while the torso remains upright. If you tilt from the top down instead, you well could tip over.
Can you explain what it means to tip the ankles? The phrase has never made sense to me 'cause my ankles don't feel capable of "tipping" or "rolling" in ski boots.
post #8 of 33
Quote:
Originally Posted by swisstrader View Post
There are times when I feel like I'm on my edges, but many times I just feel like I'm faking it....a) what's the best way to get my skis on edge and b) how do I know I'm doing it when it happens?!
There is a distinct feeling when you are gliding on your edges which is distinctly different than when your skis are moving forward while also slipping sideways. You can feel the smoothness of the slicing across the snow and can sometimes even hear the difference.
I would suggest that you begin with simple carved traverses until you feel the difference in sensory feedback. Align your stance to keep the weight of your upper torso (shoulders and head) aligned over your downhill foot while moving your hip uphill to tip your skis onto their uphill edges. Slightly flex at the ankles, knees and hip to allow further tipping to the uphill edges by moving your knees uphill. Point your skis at about 45 degrees down the hill and ride your edges in an arc to a stop. Repeat in both directions until you are able to do this comfortably without any side slipping of your skis. Look at your tracks to see that they are fine lines in an arc across the hill.
Once you can feel the difference between an arcing and a slipping ski you can then begin to take your traverses to different angles down the slope and to different terrain and snow conditions. Then begin to link traverses with turns before allowing the skis to arc to a stop. But get comfortable in recognizing the sensation of a truly arcing ski with these simple tasks before trying to apply them to higher speeds and steeper terrain. You must learn to have the patience to allow your skis to attain and maintain an edge glide by what you do with your stance before applying this skill to more complex situations.
post #9 of 33
Quote:
Originally Posted by swisstrader View Post
This might sound funny, but I feel like I might tip over when I'm truly on edge.
Sounds like you're banking and you're not going fast enough.
post #10 of 33
Quote:
Originally Posted by chanwmr View Post
Sounds like you're banking and you're not going fast enough.
Ski turn radius might also be too big.
post #11 of 33
Carving is the result of the skis slicing through the snow. Getting that to happen without tipping over isn't very hard and it doesn't require speed or smaller sidecut skis. The edge purchase needed is very similar to the amount of edge purchase used to stand sideways on the hill. Which is why the traverse drill is so effective.
Like Kneale pointed out the ankles play an important part in this. There should be a small amount of lateral ankle play in your boots. While traversing use this to shift pressure to the uphill edges of the boots. Which will drive the ski edges into the snow with just enough pressure to make them slice through the snow instead of skid sideway. While this is happening notice that the ankle movement will cause the knees to move as well. If the snow is hard you may feel compelled to roll the knees or shift the hips more but in most cases this isn't a big move and isn't needed.
Once we start trying to do this while actually making turns we need to notice how we initiate the turns. If we use a lot of rotary (turning the feet/legs/body/hips/arms) the movement breaks down and a skid occurs. Gain edge purchase first then guide the skis through the turns using a bias towards edge and pressure. And by all means be patient. The skis will come around. I see a lot of folks hasten their turns by adding too much rotary and the skis skid as a result. So focus on creating just enough edge and pressure to keep the skis slicing through the snow. Once you gain the ability to carve this type of turn, we can add in some of the rotary that we removed earlier. Although it shouldn't originate from the shoulders and torso. Some leg steering will cause the pressure to shift to the front of the skis. Mind you this is happening as the skis continue to slice through the snow.
post #12 of 33
Lito Tejada-Flores in his Breakthrough on the New Skis video advocates to "stay focused on your feet." He suggests that when you start your tipping movements with the feet, as opposed to upper body movements with your knees, hips, etc, that your body will more or less find it's own balance due to the kenetic chain, that your body will achieve whatever angles are necessary to maintain balance. Jon Clendenin also advocates the same employment of the kenetic chain effect in his teaching. Harb goes a step further by employing counterotation and counterbalancing movements to counteract the tipping forces of a carving ski. You can verify this to yourself just by standing on some kind of an incline platform in your living room. Stand on the board and tip your feet as you would when you are skiing. You will quickly find that if you don't employ some kind of counteracting measures, that is your upper body will have to tilt to the opposite direction that your legs and feet are tipping to just to maintain balance, that you will indeed fall over.
post #13 of 33
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mac View Post
Lito Tejada-Flores in his Breakthrough on the New Skis video advocates to "stay focused on your feet." He suggests that when you start your tipping movements with the feet, as opposed to upper body movements with your knees, hips, etc, that your body will more or less find it's own balance due to the kenetic chain, that your body will achieve whatever angles are necessary to maintain balance. Jon Clendenin also advocates the same employment of the kenetic chain effect in his teaching. Harb goes a step further by employing counterotation and counterbalancing movements to counteract the tipping forces of a carving ski. You can verify this to yourself just by standing on some kind of an incline platform in your living room. Stand on the board and tip your feet as you would when you are skiing. You will quickly find that if you don't employ some kind of counteracting measures, that is your upper body will have to tilt to the opposite direction that your legs and feet are tipping to just to maintain balance, that you will indeed fall over.
This is true, your body will take care of itself unless you are trying to throw it out of wack to do some crazy stuff, but were not talking about doing frontside 360's and. oh thats skateboarding. haha. If you move the right parts, the other parts will follow, unless you just have horrible ballance.

As for feeling like tipping over, You should be able to trust your equipment, if your on rentals, then I duno... Might not be fun. One of the first things I was told was to trust the equipment, and well, its really important, it allows you to loosen up and enjoy it. You might tense up and over you go.

I never understood the turning the ankles thing. My ankles are in boots where my feet cant move except my toes. So I started using my knees. I might be getting the correct effect, but just unknowingly. I think I will try to roll my ankles next time I go out. Gonna do pivot slips, I'll have to use my ankles to do it, not my knees.
post #14 of 33

Lito's first Breakthrough on Skis video has a section on sideslipping and pivot slips that deals with using foot and ankle movements. John Clendenin's website, skidoctors.com, also has a nice explanation of how the kenetic chain that I previously mentioned works. Go to his site and scroll down till you find it.

post #15 of 33

So many works have been published regarding the "Kinetic Chain" idea. Unfortunately the whole concept of allowing a movement to sequentially move up through the body has been mis-interpreted to mean that the upper body should be static, or that the core should move later than the feet. Which produces very poor balancing skills. A more recent addition to our training regimines is Pertubation training. Which uses small disruptions of our balancing to get the whole body involved in our balancing activities. Especially activities of the deep core muscles and the torso in general. Which if you think about it is exactly what we experience as we slide across the snowpack. Our route and the way we are contantly changing directions requires a more active and simultaneous involvement of the entire body than would be possible if we parked the core in a static position while allowing the movements to move up through the body. Add to that the variations in snow density, surface irregualrities, and variable terrain and it should be obvious that the idea of sequential movements don't produce good balance.

 

post #16 of 33

For those wondering about the reality of "Ankle Tipping" (actually, foot inversion/eversion via foot rotation inside the ski boot) be aware that it depends on the proper fitting of your ski boots.

 

Most importantly, the higher your cuff goes up your lower leg, the more it will interfere with this kind of lateral boot tipping as driven by the 'ankle' (foot inversion/eversion).  Each time I've cut my shell and liner down further I've found more range of lateral boot tipping when driven by foot eversion/inversion.

 

For verification, try tipping your foot while in street shoes.  You'll have considerable tipping available.  Now try it in over-the-ankle hiking boots.  Here, you'll still have good movement, just a bit restricted.  As the boot goes higher up the leg it will increasingly interfere with this tipping motion as the lower leg shaft will restrict it by blocking lateral movement of the shell cuff.  At some point, you'll only have 'morphing' of the lower leg (rotation) allowing any tipping of the boot.

 

.ma

post #17 of 33

Although we feel edging movements originating in the ankles and knees, the reality is that edging movements take place in the hip socked.  Adduction and abduction.  The ankle is a modified hinge joint which does have some lateral movement.  However with the constriction of the boot, these movements are basically restricted to maintaining balance and not affecting edge angles.  The knee is a hinge joint and has no lateral movement until it is flexed at an angle less than 90 degrees.  Any "knee angulation" comes from the femur rotating in the hip socket.  So all edging movements truly come from the ball and socket joint of the hip.

     This being said it is important to concentrate on the joint that works for you or your student best, to achieve the desired outcome. Just because it comes from one place doesn't mean we don't feel it somewhere else.

post #18 of 33

Loki, While I agree that the whole body needs to be involved in balancing, your conclusion is an oversimplication of the balancing process. A three degree mis-alignment of the boots does profound things to a skier's performance, not to mention their ability to even find balance. The sensation feels a lot like trying to drive a mis-aligned car. Getting onto and off of an edge is much more difficult in a set up like that. Ironically, if we are just standing still we may not even feel it. The point I'm trying to make here is that even though there is only say a half inch of sideway play in a ski boot, it can have a profound effect on our ability to focus pressure on the edges of the skis. The proof can also be seen in what the body does to adjust to such a small movement in the ankles. Everything moves and adjusts, not just the hip.

post #19 of 33

The original question was about how one edges a ski, not how do we balance on that edge. As I mentioned in my post; the amount of movement within the boot is restricted to the point of balance maintenance and not edging movements.   With this being the case the movement of the femur within the hip socket is what allows edging (lateral) movements, not the ankle or knee.  I agree that if one's alignment is off, their movements will be effected; but this doesn't change what joints are responsible for edging movements. Just because a car's wheels are out of alignment doesn't mean that the steering wheel no longer turns the wheels.  

post #20 of 33

There are times when I feel like I'm on my edges, but many times I just feel like I'm faking it....a) what's the best way to get my skis on edge and b) how do I know I'm doing it when it happens?

 

Loki, there's the original question. Please notice he's talking about putting the skis on edge while skiing. That requires him to balance on the skis that are on edge. He also asks how he can tell when he has done so. The answer is the same. It's when you feel yourself balancing on the skis that are tipped on edge. Not to mention your answer is too simplistic and doesn't account for the variety of ways we can get a ski onto an edge. Correct me if I'm wrong but you're saying the only way to tip skis on edge involves hip abduction /adduction. How about simply flexing one leg and inclining? Or inversion / eversion of the ankles? Hip abduction / adduction is only one of many ways to create tipping. With all due respect  I feel  you are speaking in absolutes that are really just oversimplified versions of a concept that have led you to an erroneous conclusion. 

 


Edited by justanotherskipro - 2/10/2009 at 11:50 pm


Edited by justanotherskipro - 2/10/2009 at 11:52 pm


Edited by justanotherskipro - 2/10/2009 at 11:54 pm
post #21 of 33

Justanotherskipro,

 

     Again, the question asked is about how we edge a ski.  While I agree being balanced is important, he is asking how to get a ski on edge.  

     I wasn't trying to say that the only way to get a ski on edge was through adduction/abduction.  What i was saying is that edging movement are controled in the ball and socket joint of the hip.  Whether it is through abduction/adduction, femur rotation, or femur flexion in your case of inclination(simply flexing one leg and inclining).  The fact remains that the ankle does not have any lateral movement.  Inversion/eversion occur in the foot not the ankle. Which if you try to invert your ankle while it is weight bearing you will notice that there is femur rotation as you do it.  Which as was said before with the constriction of the boots it does not have an effect on the edging of a ski.  Those movements are important in balancing while skiing but not edging.  Also the knee does not move laterally either.  Knee angulation is a result of the femur rotating in the hip socket.   

     The point I was trying to make with my original statement is that, while we may focus on certain areas to make things happen that may not be where the movement actually originates.  

     I don't think this is an oversimplified way of looking at edging.  And the biomechanics say it is not erroneous. I think if people simplified things concepts would be much easier to grasp and people would be more successful in their skiing.  

post #22 of 33

Not going to argue with you about your interpretation of the question. I think it's clear the OP wants to carve turns not just tip the skis onto a edge.

 

I see a lot of inconsistencies in your posts.

You wrote the following...

" I wasn't trying to say that the only way to get a ski on edge was through adduction/abduction."

 

Which is in direct conflict with the earlier statement...

"Although we feel edging movements originating in the ankles and knees, the reality is that edging movements take place in the hip socked.  Adduction and abduction.  The ankle is a modified hinge joint which does have some lateral movement.  However with the constriction of the boot, these movements are basically restricted to maintaining balance and not affecting edge angles."

 

Followed by your last statement...

"The point I was trying to make with my original statement is that, while we may focus on certain areas to make things happen that may not be where the movement actually originates."  

 

You're writing in absolutes then waffling. The hip is certainly an important part of lateral movement of the lower limbs but we have to be careful when saying things like "the reality is edging movements take place in the hip socket. Adduction and abduction". That's not always the case, I also wonder how you can say we feel a move originate in the lower legs (the origin is in the lower leg muscle engagement that actually drives the eversion/inversion), then you contradict yourself by saying it doesn't originate there.

 

Same can be said for the idea that edging does not include balancing. Edging with no pressure is useless and that pressure comes from balancing the forces through the CoM and the edges of the ski(s). Otherwise all we are doing is tipping the ski without getting any edge purchase. Again, IMO the OP want to carve a turn, not just stand and tip the ski onto an edge.

 

While I see your points clearly, I do not agree with some of your conclusions. Too many exceptions for them to be the universal truths you seem to think and say they are. In any event I am not interested in an argument, all I want to do is point out the inconsistencies in your statements and how that leads me to disagree with your conclusions.

 


Edited by justanotherskipro - 2/11/2009 at 06:55 am
post #23 of 33
Quote:
Originally Posted by justanotherskipro View Post

Not going to argue with you about your interpretation of the question. You wrote the following...

" I wasn't trying to say that the only way to get a ski on edge was through adduction/abduction."

 

Which is in direct conflict with the earlier statement...

"Although we feel edging movements originating in the ankles and knees, the reality is that edging movem.....................

 

I'm still trying to figure out how I can turn my ankle in the ways he's saying is impossible.

Balancie is part of getting sk's on edge. I'm a newbie, and I know this. If you cannot balance, you will fall while trying to edge. It's a whole leg movement started down at your ankles. I cannot use my ankles, my boots are to tight for that, but I am probably using them and not knowing it. =) Then your knee's and your hips. They all work together to edge your ski's. Watch video's of guys carving, you will see them use their whole leg. You just simply cannot use just your hips. I engage my turn mentally with my knee's. Like I said. I am probably using my ankles and not knowing it. But my boots are a bit tight.

Since when are we Abducting people in here as well? =)

post #24 of 33

Fair enough.  You don't have to agree with me. I have to ask however, is the femur located in the lower leg. I think that is what you were referring to in my last example.

In your opinion what are the many ways to create tipping to effect edge angle. 

post #25 of 33

Loki, The femur is not in the lower leg but it is in the lower limb. Sorry for the confusion. I though I wrote lower limb.

Tipping is getting the skis up on edge and sometimes includes a lateral bending of the body. As you noted there is a small amount of lateral movement in the ankle / foot, a small amount in the knee (at certain angles), and a lot in the hip. We can use the ankles for a few degrees of tipping which you disagree with because IYO it isn't a large enough move to be considered tipping. We can incline on the inside ski without flexing anything. We can shorten one leg resulting in ILEAN turns. We can use a combination of all of these to create a turn. we can also use abduction / adduction of the entire leg, commonly called knee ab/adduction. As you pointed out the hip and the femur are articulating to produce this more than the knee actually bending sideways.

Along with how we tip, we need to understand that the tipping does nothing without some pressure control. The idea of edge purchase, or edge grip, includes both. To focus the pressure accurately enough to gain purchase we need to keep the body aligned so that the line of force goes through the edge. Balancing is the term we use for that activity. Which as far as I read from the OP is what he wants to do better. Carved turns being his objective.

post #26 of 33

 You are wrong.  The femur is in the lower limb, but is still regulated by muscles in and around the hip socket, and only in the lower limb in comparison to the humerus, if you know where that even is.  The reality is this: the ankle does not move laterally, the knee only moves laterally within the rotation of the hip socket.  Furthermore, if one wants to inclinate, it still requires flexion of the hip socket to allow proper balance over the outside ski.  Although you may feel edging movements coming from the ankle and knee, biomechanics tells us that they are not coming from the ankle and knee; however, these movements come from the hip joint through adduction or abduction, flexion and extension, or rotation of the femur, which is the only way that we can increase or decrease our edge angle.  Regardless of your inaccurate and erroneous theories, perhaps you could look into biomechanics class in order to fully understand the capabilities of the human body and its capacity.

 

 

post #27 of 33

I ski in Nordica Dobermans...high and tight cuffs...and I can move my ankle to invert the foot (tip to the outside) enough to change direction while skiing on the edges.  This action is enough to make me tip over unless I counter balance with a bit of flexibility in the hips and spine.  All this puts the skis on edge and they carve.  The force is in the ankle, and the knee and hip are allowed to drop toward the snow while the body counterbalances over the outside ski.

 

The balance we need to achieve is with a straight line of balance from the body's center of mass (somewhere in the abdominal area) through the outside knee to the outside ski's inside edge just behind the ball of that foot.

 

Here are a couple good drills.

--Stationary on an easy green run pointing somewhat downhill, supporting yourself with your poles, balance on your skis uphill edges and push yourself to get going.  Slide on the edges and leave sharp tracks in the snow.  Tip the inside foot more and more to it's inside edge (lift the big toe edge off the snow) and stay balanced over the outside ski.  Do this more down the fall line each time and increase little by little to steeper pitches.

 

--On an easy run, lift just the tail of the inside ski and tip that ski strongly to the little toe edge.  You want just the outside curve of the shovel of the inside ski on the snow, and don't try to increase the edge angle of the outside ski, just balance over that outside ski.  Slide along making a sharp track in the snow.

 

--On an almost flat place, stay stationary and balance on the uphill edges and edge as much as possible by really tipping the inside big toe way off the snow and balancing with your body over the inside edge of the outside ski.  Now, do it on the downhill edges...balance with your body way over the uphill ski.  It'll work.  On an easy green run, make garlands doing this, making sharp carved tracks in the snow.  Start out maybe 15° to the fall line and switch edges as you did in the stationary drill, and repeat making garlands.  Increase to 30° to the fall line, then another run at 45°, and another and another up to 90° in that part of the garland.  Repeat to the other side of the fall line. 

 

Note that we are not pushing on the big toe edge of the outside ski.  That causes the legs to A-frame, is limited in the angle that can be achieved when the knees come together, and may cause the outside ski to skid out on hard snow.  Also note that we aren't using any twisting action of the feet; we're just allowing the sidecut of the ski to turn the ski when it's put up on its edge.  I've been told to "guide" the skis around the turn when they're carving, and I never understand how they can be guided when the edges are locked in the groove they're making in the snow.  Do ski into counter (hips & shoulders face the outside ski) before the skis reach the fall line.  This is more than just facing downhill all the time except in the quickest short radius turns where there's no time to do anything except face downhill.

 

Is there a difference between "carving" and "arc-to-arc?"  I don't think so, but others may parse these terms and create a difference in meaning.

post #28 of 33

The OP's question was, "What does it feel like to carve?"  I'm not sure that an in-depth discussion of anatomy and physiology is going to be all that helpful.

 

Some skis and some types of snow reward carving and punish skidding.  Irregular, hard snow conditions in particular can give you a jaw-rattling ride if you try to skid across it, but are ridden smoothly if you carve. 

 

When you first start carving your skis, you may find the sensation surprising.  Rather than immediately scrubbing speed when you turn, a carved ski will swing around comparatively easily, quickly and much faster than you expect.  If your skiing is principally defensive (you turn principally to bleed speed), you may dislike the sensation of carving and go immediately back to skidding. 

 

There are mental cues you can think about to facilitate the action of carving.  For some people, it's helpful to think of tipping the inside little toe edge into the snow whilst simultaneously pulling the foot back.  Others simply have to think about an "active inside foot."  Still others like to think of pointing their inside knee in the direction of the turn.  There are many others, which you can read about here on Epic, if ever the search function gets fixed. 

 

But these cues are just that - cues.  They do not begin to capture what is really going on in your body.  Once you feel what it's like to carve and decide it's a sensation you like and want to do more of, your motor system will start making the impossibly complex changes in balance and muscle tone to achieve these movements.  You can refine the movements further through feedback: your own sensations, lessons, coaching, video analysis, etc. 

post #29 of 33

Thank you for posting a response to the original question that can be understood without a technical manual.

 

It's frustrating to read through this thread for insights and instead see two posters arguing with each over technical details that are likely not important to the original poster. They are calling each other "wrong" and so on back and forth. I doubt the original poster cares - he just asked what it feels like to carve, which is subjective anyway.  

 

It reminds me of something my girlfriend points out to be every now and then when I am watching ski videos. She is an excellent skier, by the way, with over 25 years experience, so she knows the jargon. But she hears instructors using that jargon and says that they should instead keep it simple so that people can understand. Apparently, this is especially important when teaching women or beginners. They don't care about the technicalities and jargon like die hard dudes do.

 

So, the point is, instead of saying "flex your leg" she says to just say, "bend your knee." Don't say "femur", say "upper leg", and so on. You shouldn't need an anatomy and physiology course to understand a skiing lesson.

 

I think sometimes we get in the way of the goal, which is to help the student ski better. You don't have to know what a camshaft is to drive a car. Nor do you have to know where your humerus is to tell a funny joke. ;-)

 

Best Regards,

Geoff

post #30 of 33
Quote:
 a) what's the best way to get my skis on edge and b) how do I know I'm doing it when it happens?!

a)  Tip the foot on the inside of the turn.  It isn't how far the ankle actually inverts (although more is better and some racers punch out the cuff), but the effort of tipping the inside foot to lift the big toe off the snow at the same time you're lightening that foot on the snow puts the body into the position of putting the skis one edge.  Do not use the knees--they are not made to bend sideways very far, and you need that bit of allowable motion to absorb an unexpected thump.  Do not evert the outside foot (roll it on to its big toe edge).  Keep the outside ankle straight and strong to carry most of your weight.  Very important--have patience.  Roll the skis up on edge, then have the patience to let the skis on edge turn you.  You'll want the inside foot light on the snow, and close in to the outside foot, and pulled back alongside the outside foot, and tipped up on its little toe edge.  Tip more as the turn progresses.  Keep in mind that we never do as much as we think we're doing, so do more than you think is needed.  While you're keeping the inside foot alongside the outside foot (don't shove it forward), push the inside hip forward to counter and bend in the trunk to angulate.  These help get the body into position for more edging.  Start on a wide open green run and get the feel for silent slicing of the snow.  When it starts to work, here's a great drill--on a very flat section of the beginner hill, stand across the hill on your downhill edges.  Push yourself with your poles to start sliding on those edges.  When you're headed straight down the fall line, flop over to the other edges and carve the other way until you're across the hill.  Flop to the downhill edges and repeat, repeat, repeat.  You're carving garlands.  Ride up again and do it all to the other side.  If you have sharp slices in the snow, you did it right.  If you pushed your skis to the sides and skidded, well, don't.

 

b)  You'll hear the difference.  And feel it.

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