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Wondering about quivers...

post #1 of 14
Thread Starter 
OK, so this year is the first year I've ever owned skis. That's mostly because this is the first year I've spent enough time on the slopes to justify it (22 days so far). I recently bought a second pair of skis and have started to actually believe that the right equipment can make a rather large difference...up till now, I blamed any poor skiing on my technique. I still mostly blame my technique, but am now understanding what the right ski for the job can do for me.

So...in my naivite concerning quivers, I feel like I don't really need anything more than my two pairs of skis. I'm afraid I don't quite get the need for 7 different skis in a quiver. Am I missing something again?

Ok...using me as an example: I like to ski primarily off piste but do spend some time on groomers with my wife and sometimes will hit bump runs (especially if there hasn't been any fresh in a while). My skis:

1) Nordica Afterburners (84mm under foot)
Used on days when there isn't much fresh to be found. Means I'll be skiing groomers, more consolidated off-piste conditions, bumps.

2) Icelantic Shaman (>110mm under foot)
Used if there is fresh to be found. Means I'll be skiing in soft conditions on just about any terrain.

So...what am I missing?

I guess a true bump ski...but I don't really set out to rip bumps that often, and the Afterburners seem to do well enough for me.

Maybe a more hardcore powder ski? Something like a JJ? I'm thinking not needed so far...the Shamans have eaten up everything I've showed them. I feel like they'd do just fine even if I won the lottery and took a heli trip.

So...am I being naive and cheep? For you true gear-heads with quivers of 10 skis, what would you add and why?
post #2 of 14
I'd say it really depends on what kind of skiing you do. If you do lots of different types then you hit on the key already - the right tool for the job can certainly go a long way to help you perform at your best.

Also, consider that some people (like me) keep a quiver for bad snow conditions versus good snow conditions. There are some skis that I would never take out and risk killing on rocks, etc. I don't get my skis free so I like to take care of them.
post #3 of 14
"So...in my naivite concerning quivers, I feel like I don't really need anything more than my two pairs of skis. I'm afraid I don't quite get the need for 7 different skis in a quiver. Am I missing something again?"

If you feel like you don't need anything more than your current 2 pairs, go with your feeling!



1. i'll be the first to admit that i have gone through several quivers in the past 4 season (this was due to upping my days from about 5-10 to 60 a season and finally having all my old equipment crap out after 20 years, thus forcing me to get new equipment...i got bit by the gear whore bug hard and bought too many skis).

2. last season, which saw me skiing 63 days all over the West (Tahoe, Mammoth, Yosemite, Colorado, Utah, Wyoming, New Mexico, Oregon), i had a quiver of 6. yet out of those 63 days I primarily only used 2 skis. i had a full arsenal, but i kept returning to the same 2 over and over again. this prompted me to trim the quiver down to 2 (technically speaking it's 4, but 2 are the same ski and then i have one back-up pair that i just can't part with).

3. a wise Bear once told me to "pick 1 ski and make it your b@tch", meaning that while it may be fun to have a large quiver, you'll more'n likely spend all your time obsessing over which ski to take or worse yet taking all your skis to the hill and then spending the day continually swapping out instead of actually skiing.

So, if you feel you have enough with 2, then stick with 2 and learn all the nuances of those 2 (i.e. become their master).

As Noodler stated, it really depends on where you ski.

My "official" 2-ski quiver consists of:

Lib Tech NAS Freeride (93/99mm waist, 188cm length) as my everyday ski
Volant Spatula (125mm waist, 185cm length) as my powder ski

*i have an extra pair of the Lib Tech's with demo binders as i'm tweaking around with the mounting point and I have a pair of AK King Salmons (94mm and 180cm) that i just can't part with.

Additionally, i find that most of the folks i ride with are trimming down to 2 (3 at the most) pairs: something in the 80-99 range as an everyday plank and then something in the 105-145mm range for powder (if you go with 3 then it would be something in like a 95ish, then something in a 115, and finally something in a 130 with reverse camber).

now don't get me wrong, i still have a wish list (about 6 skis in the 110-117mm waisted range that i'd like to demo), but ultimately i don't really need 'em. likewise, if i were living and skiing harder snow i'd probably want something with <75mm waist and a short turning radius for such conditions, but as of now my Lib Techs do well enough in every type of condition except for BP and knee deep.

that's just my 2cents.
post #4 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wannabe View Post
I recently bought a second pair of skis and have started to actually believe that the right equipment can make a rather large difference...up till now, I blamed any poor skiing on my technique. I still mostly blame my technique, but am now understanding what the right ski for the job can do for me.
Similar situation here. Decided to pick a second pair of skis (Gotamas) this season, due to my love/hate relationship with skiing powder. I had always loved the floaty feeling of it, but always seemed to spend too much time in the back seat trying to keep the tips up with my AC4s. Wow, what a difference the Gotamas have made. Now powder is a love/love relationship: so much fun and now so much easier to handle.

I am still very happy using the AC4s on non powder days and for skiing moguls. I don't think I have need for a third ski in my quiver, I just wish I hadn't waited all these years to find my second.
post #5 of 14
My quiver has evolved a lot over the years as I have gotten better and my knowledge of gear has improved. If I were to do it all over, I'd probably have 2 skis: 1 pair would be 90ish that was good in moguls, all mtn and small amounts of POW. I would also have just one pair of awesome fatties that is versatile (think Katana or JJs) that I would use for any amount of deeper snow. Its been fun having a quiver but it really becomes a pain after awhile...maintaining and servicing skis is a hassle...I'd rather be skiing!
post #6 of 14
I am East Coast, so my requirements in a quiver may be slightly different than yours, but I feel like 3 is about the minimum necessary. Apparently, so do you.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Wannabe View Post
I like to ski primarily off piste but do spend some time on groomers with my wife and sometimes will hit bump runs (especially if there hasn't been any fresh in a while).
For me on the East Coast, this means a fat ski, (by east coast standards about 100mm) a Carver/Race ski (60's to low 70mm's) and a twin-tip somewhere in the low 80's. There ARE other skis in MY quiver, and more that I would love to add (including a 115+ rockered beast of some sort) but I can certainly be happy with those three. Well, those three plus a touring setup I guess. Damn, my necessary quiver is getting bigger each time I edit my post...

Living where you do I could see bumping every waist up by a bit, making the afterburners be your hardpack ski. I would suggest a straight(ish) soft(ish) twintip in the low 90's for bumps, spring snow, park? and those days when the afterburner is too little, but the shaman is too much. Maybe a mojo or Prophet 90?

post #7 of 14
I think everyone starts out with the goal of a 2 ski quiver, but the more you ski, the more the quiver seems to grow. I started out with 2 (1 for everyday & 1 for pow) and thought that would be it. But it was the quest for the perfect powder ski that made my quiver explode to 8. What makes it tricky every ski has plus & minus points. Add the fact that your tastes will also change as your skiing ability changes.

I'd like to trim it back a bit as I think may have finally found my perfect powder board (Kuro).
post #8 of 14
From what I read, it seems that you have it covered fairly well. If you must have one more pair, how about a carver (65-70 mm underfoot)? There are days when you may want to spend all day just cruising (especially with wifey).

Dennis
post #9 of 14

Boots?

I just got back from a 5 day trip at Mammoth where conditions were powder to hard groomers. I discoverd that my boots were a major source of my increasing quiver size. All of a sudden I'm down to 2 skis, Mantras for harder snows and Gotomas for softer days. I got some noticeably higher performance boots. Now my skis do my bidding not the other way around. It wasn't the skis, or the tune on the skis, it was the lack of boot power. Wish I had figured this out sooner. It would have given me more money to spend on ski trips instead of skis.
post #10 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by dookey67 View Post
3. a wise Bear once told me to "pick 1 ski and make it your b@tch", meaning that while it may be fun to have a large quiver, you'll more'n likely spend all your time obsessing over which ski to take or worse yet taking all your skis to the hill and then spending the day continually swapping out instead of actually skiing.
This is probably the best advice. Most of us skiers should stick to this rule. Pick one ski that will do what you want to do all season and stick with it, and make it your beeeeeeeotch. Switching equipment around constantly will screw you up and make it easier for those mistakes to hurt you.
post #11 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by Denny1969 View Post
From what I read, it seems that you have it covered fairly well. If you must have one more pair, how about a carver (65-70 mm underfoot)? There are days when you may want to spend all day just cruising (especially with wifey).

Dennis
Everyone needs a slalom ski.
post #12 of 14
There are very few skis that are very good for most types of skiing.
post #13 of 14
I think alot depends on what type of skiing you love. For me, it's bumps so I have would need a dedicated bump ski. It works well also since if I ski with my wife, she only likes groomers and a bump ski does fine there. Where I would have a problem is powder. I guess I should get a fatty for that.
post #14 of 14
You must have been reading my mind...
Your thinking matches what I have done this year to the letter...
A 2 ski quiver works perfect...
I have a pair of Dynastar Contact LTD's for no new snow days...
I have a pair of Goliath's for the fresh snow days...
I will be looking to add/replace the Goliaths with a pair of Shamans...
That should cover just about everything I ski in...
Maybe it's just the snow and conditions that we get in Colorado...
That combination has done quite well for me...
The quiver will most likely evolve as my skills increase, but will most likely continue to have a no new snow and fresh snow skis to choose from...
If I remember right Wannabe, you tried the Goliaths, but had a much more enjoyable time on the Shamans...
I still need to give them a whirl..I am all over the easier to use fat ski...
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