EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › Tuning, Maintenance and Repairs › binding tension for a 6 year old
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binding tension for a 6 year old

post #1 of 16
Thread Starter 
This past weekend, my son took a tumble, he wasn't going that fast, but neither ski came off. I was right behind him and was quite worried. He was crying, and I thought he really hurt his leg. Especially because he rolled right around. It turned out he was ok, but not without having to have ski patrol bring him down on the sled. He was crying and refused to ski and insisted he was really hurt.

Anyway, his binding is set to 2. He is 6 years old, and he weighs roughly 42 pounds. Should I loosen the tension or is it just right. He is still a beginner, I just want to make sure next time, he doesnt get injured due to the binding not releasing. This is his third year skiing, he is able to ski on the main hill, but only the big family run. He is still a beginner.

Thanks

AMG
post #2 of 16
There are more things to consider than age and weight. It is age, weight, height, boot sole length and abilities.

This should really be done by a shop. Most will check out/service bindings for $15. Less if you buy something.

I say all that and except for an annual check up (check service ability), take care of mine and my daughters because I've had the shop screw hers up too many times.

2 sounds high for someone his size and abilities. The below link has a chart.

http://www.dinsetting.com/index.htm

Make sure you are accurately/honestly entering the data and aren't guessing, to include abilities. If he's a beginner, I would go with skier type 1.

Good info here too -

http://www.vermontskisafety.com/vsrhome.php

As a reference, my 11 y/o daughter at 65#, is 4' 5", bsl of 261 (ish), type 2 skier (this is her 4rth year) and is set at 2.5 or 2.75 (can't remember and they're in the basement).

Skis coming off too easily can cause injury too.
post #3 of 16
Bindings are not perfect. They are not expected to prevent all ski injuries and might not release in every fall. Get them torque tested if you want to be sure that they are still safe.
post #4 of 16
I coach 5 & 6 year olds so I see a lot of falls in this age group. Quite often skis do not release, partially because their little bodies are so flexible. I sometimes wonder how they twist in the directions they do. Most of the time they will get up without it bothering them, sometimes there will be some tears. Once I've had to take one down in a sled because of a situation similar to yours and when she got unstrapped at the bottom she walked away without even a limp. So, go get them tested or make adjustments yourself if you feel comfortable but remember for this age group there is a lot of mental stuff going on as well and it sounds like that's what was at play here.
post #5 of 16
Also just because you roll around doesn't necessarily mean that there was any torsion. I have had falls were I rolled a couple times and my skis didn't come off only to have them pop off when I happened to clip a snow bank I was traversing across a run. Also falls can seem/ look a lot worse than they really are.

Also kids get scared and convince themselves that they are really hurt when they aren't. I ember when my brother was around 8 we were doing a NASTAR course when he clipped a gate witha ski and fell. Convinced himself he had broken his leg, ski patrol took him down on the sled and everything. Next day he was back out skiing.
post #6 of 16
Also, binding performance is very dependent on the state of the binding spring and the numeric setting of the binding may have no correllation to reality. New bindings may have a higher release threshold than indicated by the number, while older bindings may actually have a lower threshold. That is why it is a very good idea to take them to a shop that can do a release test. As an example, based on the charts, my wife should have her bindings set at 8.5. However, her bindings are actually set to 6, because that is what the release test showed would yield true 8.5 release behavior. Blindly setting the binding to 8.5 would have resulted in a much higher true setting in this case.
post #7 of 16
Agree with both replies...my 5.5 year old is close to same weight and ability and the shop set hers to 1 (w/ bsl of 227 mm) when we did a torque test. I had them at .75 when she was doing the magic carpet, but will move them back to 1 now that she is skiing a bit faster taking the beginner chair. Even at .75, she never came out while turning, but did step out once or twice when she got happy feet trying to walk.
post #8 of 16
The chart says DIN = 1 for a small Type 1 skier. 2 is WAY too high.

Who set it at 2?
post #9 of 16
Thread Starter 
the place i bought the skis, typical sports store. I never thought to question it, until now.

I also realize that there is the mental aspect, but othertimes he fell, it wasn't as issue. so I am thinking, maybe the skis should have released in this case specifically
post #10 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by AMG View Post
. so I am thinking, maybe the skis should have released in this case specifically
Have the bindings set based on the things I listed in my first post and not based on the event that brought you to post here. The bindings are set twice as high as they should be for him. Correct that first.

You could also have the bindings checked at a ski shop (not sports store). I just had my daughters done for $15. They did it while I waited and watched. The machine makes sure that the bindings are functioning correctly and will release as designed. It took ten minutes including the paper work.

Maybe, just maybe, the place you got the skis did it right and as geoffda pointed out, the tension should be set based on how the binding is performaing and not the indicator number. That could be a reason it was set too high.

I don't mean to be a naggin Nell about this but I'm skiing with a brace this year because my binding didn't come off last year. This year I squirm everytime I see someone fall or watch kids purposefully sitting on the tails of their skis with their boots in the bindings as they go down hill. That's asking for a torn ACL!
post #11 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by L&AirC View Post
Maybe, just maybe, the place you got the skis did it right and as geoffda pointed out, the tension should be set based on how the binding is performaing and not the indicator number. That could be a reason it was set too high.
If that is true, then the bindings are faulty. DINs are calibrated -- a 2 is a 2 across all bindings.
post #12 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by BigE View Post
If that is true, then the bindings are faulty. DINs are calibrated -- a 2 is a 2 across all bindings.

I agree. I was going by what geoffda said in his example. Binding was tensioning higher than indicator read.

What would a shop do? Set it based on the machine or tell you you need new bindings?
post #13 of 16
Can the binding even be set to 1?
post #14 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by BigE View Post
If that is true, then the bindings are faulty. DINs are calibrated -- a 2 is a 2 across all bindings.
Yes, but...but the DIN indicator window is not a precision indicator, and there can also be parallax error due to the angle one looks through the marked indicator window to the line on the binding part. Get them release-tested.
post #15 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by BigE View Post
Can the binding even be set to 1?
Kid's bindings go below to DIN values below 1.
post #16 of 16
Sure, but can the OP's binding?
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