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Mountain Employment

post #1 of 24
Thread Starter 
So the handful of times I have been skiing over the course of my short life, for the few months following my departure I have been quite "depressed." Rarely did a day go by that I didnt wish I was still in the mountains skiing and living in Gods country. Im starting to take this as a sign that this is where I belong and I should move there. Well since I am graduating from college this spring I am actually realistically considering this.

My Questions are:

1. What would be some options for employment in these areas (CO) that would allow some time for skiing each week. I know there are the usual lift operators and ski rental places and such but what else could one possibly do to make ends meet. Im going to be graduating with a degree in Business Management if that would help anything. Im not good enough skiier yet to teach, maybe one day.

2. Where do people live up there? Every time Ive been all I ever see are high end condos and places charging several hundred a night. Ive heard of resorts providing lodging for ski lift operators which is basically dorm style but there has to be other options where a guy could still make ends meet.

3. Should I actually be considering this or am I out of my mind?

Anyways, thanks for any advice you might have. Hopefully Ill be able to enjoy some of the most beautiful places on earth regularly/permanently in the comming years. Oh, and if anyone out there is in need of a 24 y/o guy with a BSBA in Management and would allow him to earn millions and still ski everyday, let me know. LOL
post #2 of 24
Do it!

I have always regretted not spending a winter working/living at a resort out west after graduating from either HS or college.

As for the logistics, I think the most important decision is to decide which resort you want to ski/work. If you have an idea of where you wanted to go, folks could probably offer some more specific suggestions.

At any of the larger resorts you won't have many problems finding like minded folks to live with. Craigslist will help you find roommates at those areas which should make it pretty affordable.

Best of luck!
post #3 of 24
1) Any job you have at a mountain you won't be working 7 days a week. You can also work part-time at almost every single position you would apply for. Also, with your degree, it wouldn't be difficult for you to get an office job for one of the mountains around here. If you really want to teach, do it. Every mountain hires non-experienced instructors in ski and ride.

2) Do a Google search. It's not hard to find acceptable living conditions within your price range. Idaho Springs is a good choice since it's about 25 minutes from Denver and less than an hour away from many ski areas. If you're too lazy to do an internet search for different price ranges and conditions in certain towns around Colorado, go here: http://www.city-data.com/forum/colorado/

3) You're not out of your mind although your family might think so. My fiancee and I just moved here from Florida with alot of negative comments from (my) family. Just because other people don't think it's a good idea don't let them discourage you. If it's really what you want to do, do it and screw everybody else. You'll be happy with where you're at and isn't that all that really matters?


Look me up when you move out here. You know you will eventually so just do it this Summer. See you when you get here.
post #4 of 24
I have worked at 2 resorts, fulltime, yearround for the last 21 years. One in Wyoming and my current resort is in Vermont. I grew up in the resort biz so I guess that's why I feel comfortable with that lifestyle.

My son grad from HS in 2007 and delayed college for a year so he could spend the winter working at Breck. He loved working there. They had really nice employee housing.

He came back after the ski season and is now in college, making his mother very happy.

You can try it out for a season and go from there.
post #5 of 24
Totally makes me think of what Warren Miller's been preaching all these years haha
post #6 of 24
You if you're graduating, a lot of those rental shops will be hiring assistant managers next fall. The pay isn't fabulous but you can make ends meet and some of the companies here in CO have lots of locations which means chances for growth and promotion. While that's a pretty easy entry into the world as it gives you a job that pays, a free pass, and time to ski. Of course, resort towns are just like anywhere else, there are all sorts of jobs. A lot of people in these towns don't want to ski when the tourists are here in force so they prefer a job that has them work weekends and get weekedays off. Waiting tables is an option, being a liftie, retail, and rentals are all valid options

In the end, do what makes you happy
post #7 of 24
Just move out here in October and get a job instructing at one of the 15 resorts hiring non-experienced instructors. If you need a room for a couple months while you get on your feet, let me know and i'll hook you up.
post #8 of 24
I waited until I was 45 to quit a life I hated and move to where the snow is.

Don't waste time if that's where you want to be!
post #9 of 24
Keep in mind, making up your mind to move and be a ski bum is 10 times harder than actually doing it. So, just do it. Oh, you should probably spend 4 or 5 months traveling across Europe this summer first.

You don't want to be a ski instructor. They don't get paid much and you'd just be a glorified babysitter.
post #10 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by vinn View Post
You don't want to be a ski instructor. They don't get paid much and you'd just be a glorified babysitter.

He's wrong.

I'm sure most people wouldn't mind being a "glorified babysitter" if they knew they get to teach levels between 4-7 and get to lap 1 and 2 all day (at Loveland...don't know the parameters of glorified babysitters elsewhere).

Instructing is just like any other profession. You can choose to not get certified and make between $9.50 and $11/hr (plus per student pay) or you can get certified and make your way up the ladder. I've heard of some level III guys making a freakin' killing wherever they work. More than enough to pay the bills if you wanted to work full-time.
post #11 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by vinn View Post

You don't want to be a ski instructor. They don't get paid much and you'd just be a glorified babysitter.
I fully agree. Been there, done that.
post #12 of 24
Thread Starter 
Thanks everyone for the advice.

TheGnar...thanks for your advice and offers as well. I will definitely look you up if/when I decide to move to the area.

In the meantime I will continue to loom here on epicski and try to learn more about this wonderful sport.

After all, Im still atleast a year out from when I would wanna move out there. Im just at that period of time in my life when Im tryin to figure out what the hell I wanna do. lol

Again, thanks for all the advice and I look forward to anymore insight people might be able to provide.
post #13 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by vinn View Post
... making up your mind to move and be a ski bum is 10 times harder than actually doing it.
agreed... it's a pretty easy thing to do.

don't hesitate if that's what you want to do. being in the mountains every day is pretty cool.
post #14 of 24
There is a place where you can live/own a house, skibum and drive less than 20 miles to 4 major resorts.
"This is the place"
post #15 of 24
hey, neat... i live in one of those places too!

tho i don't personally own a home and will not anytime soon. (it would probably require working more than 30 weeks a year)
post #16 of 24
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by skifishbum View Post
There is a place where you can live/own a house, skibum and drive less than 20 miles to 4 major resorts.
"This is the place"

Not sure what you mean by this..but ok!
post #17 of 24
I think he means Sandy, UT...
post #18 of 24
I've been thinking about this alot too lately. I currently work in the finance industry as an accountat in NYC, which is unstable at best in the current climate. I've been telling my GF if I get laid off i'm moving to colorado. The only problem is I don't think there's anything out there related to my work experiance.
post #19 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by NEwes View Post
I've been thinking about this alot too lately. I currently work in the finance industry as an accountat in NYC, which is unstable at best in the current climate. I've been telling my GF if I get laid off i'm moving to colorado. The only problem is I don't think there's anything out there related to my work experiance.

There's a World Trade Center in downtown Denver. If you couldn't get a job in accounting/finance there, where could you? Also there's multiple financial institutions in or around the Denver area.

All you people thinking of moving out here just do it already. Grow a pair!
post #20 of 24
I encourage to follow this dream and urge. I have found the pull of the mtns has increased steadily over the past few years to the point where I can't ignore it. I do enjoy my career just wish I could do it closer to the mtns. I am working on trying to find a situation that will allow me to do just that. Sometimes a place just calls to you have to heed that call. Don't wait...there is no guarantee of tomorrow. Live the life you've dreamed of today. Money helps...but its not the end-all be all of life. I say go for it.....
post #21 of 24
i love how so many people have this belief that their job ONLY exists where they're currently living... or that they can only do one job in one place.

i don't know how many times i've heard people rationalize that they must live on the east coast for this absurd reason.

i once had a friend tell me that there were no computer jobs out west... yes, that makes a lot of sense.
post #22 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by jahroy View Post
i love how so many people have this belief that their job ONLY exists where they're currently living... or that they can only do one job in one place.

i don't know how many times i've heard people rationalize that they must live on the east coast for this absurd reason.

i once had a friend tell me that there were no computer jobs out west... yes, that makes a lot of sense.
Not the second but the first. A lot of the jobs do ONLY exist where they live. There maybe SIMILAR jobs somewhere else. But not always the same.

So, if you like your job, you may or may not find another one just like it.

On the other hand, those who already hated their job, don't use it as an excuse for being lazy (looking for another one closer to the mountain).

As for computer jobs out west? Been there, done that. The job I got had hours so long (including many weekends) that although I was theorectically "closer to the mountains", I actually have less time to enjoy it.

I like my current job well enough and it's flexible enough that I can, if I so choose, to live close to the mountains and still do the same job. Except, I actually PREFER the city instead.
post #23 of 24
I hate my job (I'm also in finance/accounting) and have been thinking of moving to CO. I figure I could move to Denver and get a job in finance (I'd still hate my job but I'd get to ski a lot more!), or move to a resort town and get involved in the ski industry somehow.

Only catch...wife and 3 kids aren't too enamored with my 'ambitions'.

Actually, the kids don't mind so much...
post #24 of 24
Well, i feel very similar things about my career/and the city I live at... (20 million inhabitants )

The downside is that my country has no real mountains, snow or ski.... and despite liking beaches, swamps and rain forests, I fell more fascinated about snow capped mountains

Maybe we always want what we don't have... maybe I should live and work abroad for sometime...
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