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Why are left hand turns easier than right hand turns?

post #1 of 9
Thread Starter 
I noticed yesterday I can make left turns a lot easier than right turns. Whether it be transitioning from a left turn to a right turn (hop-turns and parallel turns) or making a right turn hockey stop from beelining a groomer.

Maybe it's my turn initiation? Pole plant? Or is skiing just like any other sport where you're just more coordinated or stronger with one side of your body than the other?

Or is it something physiological? Maybe a leg length discrepancy? I've had a couple degrees shaved off my boot soles thanks to a stance alignment and my canting has been looked at by a Master Boot fitter. They added a heel lift in one of my boots too. Can't recall if it was the left or right. I also noticed I have nice even pressure across my shin in my right boot but more pressure on the inside of my shin down through the medial portion of my ankle of my left foot when turning.

I'm afraid this could be a question with a lot of answers but perhaps there's somewhere else I should be looking or one cause is more likely give me this problem with right turns than the others?

Thanks in advance for the help!
post #2 of 9
I can't address you alignment issues, but it sounds like you still have some.

Regardless, none of us is symetrical, so we all have a more favorable turn direction. Once your alignment questions are addressed, all sorts of other factors may be involved. If you can rotate your femurs farther to the right than to the left, that may be your problem, for example. A good drill would be to find a slope tilted to the right so you could do more left turns than right.
post #3 of 9
Hi Magnus,

Kneale gives a good answer and you should follow this advice. There is one other possible reason. You don't trust standing on your left foot and favor your right. Are you right handed? This is a typical problem with must of us. We favor our strong side. Being aware that this is happening and going out and doing one footed drills on the left foot helps being more competent on the left foot.------Wigs
post #4 of 9
Magnus,

Video always helps us give better answers. I'm going to cross post this thread into the "Ask the Boot Guys" forum so that those guys can explore this aspect in more detail. Sometimes people benefit from a second opinion.
post #5 of 9
Could be almost anything--alignment, physiology, morphology, equipment, even psychology (any chance you're favoring or protecting one side due to a past injury?). The problem can even be self-caused--if you worry about what you perceive to be your weaker turn, but don't worry about the other one and "just do it," the worry alone can produce a self-fulfilling prophecy!

As Kneale points out, almost all of us have a stronger and weaker side. Certainly, explore all of the possible fixable causes. But most of all, don't worry too much about it. Seek to improve both sides. Even Wold Cup and Olympic champion Phil Mahre used to remark that his left turn was stronger than his right turn, and Bode Miller made the same point a couple years back. We are not symmetrical, yet we learn to live just fine with our "one-sidedness" in most respects. Practice without worry, and strive to improve both sides! If you catch yourself favoring your strong side--always stopping in that direction, for example--make it a point to give the "weaker" side equal or more time.

Best regards,
Bob
post #6 of 9
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wigs View Post
Hi Magnus,

Kneale gives a good answer and you should follow this advice. There is one other possible reason. You don't trust standing on your left foot and favor your right. Are you right handed? This is a typical problem with must of us. We favor our strong side. Being aware that this is happening and going out and doing one footed drills on the left foot helps being more competent on the left foot.------Wigs
I'm right-handed but my left leg is my dominant leg in terms of being my primary weight bearing leg. When I jump I jump off my left and probably land on my left. I think every ankle sprain I've had in my life has been on my right though...probably not a coincidence.

With this in mind one would think that if there were a trust issue my left turns would suffer, not my right.
post #7 of 9
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob Barnes View Post
Could be almost anything--alignment, physiology, morphology, equipment, even psychology (any chance you're favoring or protecting one side due to a past injury?). The problem can even be self-caused--if you worry about what you perceive to be your weaker turn, but don't worry about the other one and "just do it," the worry alone can produce a self-fulfilling prophecy!

As Kneale points out, almost all of us have a stronger and weaker side. Certainly, explore all of the possible fixable causes. But most of all, don't worry too much about it. Seek to improve both sides. Even Wold Cup and Olympic champion Phil Mahre used to remark that his left turn was stronger than his right turn, and Bode Miller made the same point a couple years back. We are not symmetrical, yet we learn to live just fine with our "one-sidedness" in most respects. Practice without worry, and strive to improve both sides! If you catch yourself favoring your strong side--always stopping in that direction, for example--make it a point to give the "weaker" side equal or more time.

Best regards,
Bob
Great points Bob. I probably have just favored one side all along and now it's catching up to me. I do associate to throwing a ball off-handed. Making right turns just doesn't feel as natural. It's like I have to tell myself "OK body, time for a right turn", rather than just doing it.
post #8 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by Magnus_CA View Post
I'm right-handed but my left leg is my dominant leg in terms of being my primary weight bearing leg. When I jump I jump off my left and probably land on my left. I think every ankle sprain I've had in my life has been on my right though...probably not a coincidence.

With this in mind one would think that if there were a trust issue my left turns would suffer, not my right.

Again what I described is not the absolute answer but I think in my exposure to this problem, 80% of the time it's because of what I described. So explore some of the other excellent advice and see what you come up with.---Wigs
post #9 of 9
To rule out alignment issues you should try as many one footed tests to confirm or dismiss alignment as the cause. One footed straight runs, one footed RR tracks, Realy feel it out do you have the ability to just let go when you are on one foot? or do you have to grip with the toes or do some fancy body english to stay the course? concrete answers to these questions can be very helpful.
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