New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Skis or boots? - Page 2

post #31 of 57
nolo:

When I talk with friends or folks in the office I usually ask them to consider their level of dedication ...... in real terms.

Where are you now? Where do you want to be? How much work are you actually able to spend to get there? How much have you skied this year?

As you can imagine, each answer will be quite different.
post #32 of 57
Here is somthing surely within anyones budget!

http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll...tem=1844501520

He he he he [img]tongue.gif[/img]
post #33 of 57
New means something different in Rhode Island, as do most things. I know, I lived in Providence for 3 1/2yrs. New REALLY means something different in Pawtucket or Olneyville. Trust me. :
post #34 of 57
If I can make a few assumptions I will assume the skier has a “reasonable” pair of boots and skis so I would save the “big” bucks and have the current boots fitted by a tech and purchase a nice pair of foot beds. That would be my vote. Of course they wont look so pretty as a nice new pair of skis and the vast majority will purchase skis, inexpensive bindings, cheap poles, and then even cheaper boots.

I work in the shop on and off and if the customer can’t afford what they really need I send them to a swap or to a forlorn instructor I know that wants to off load rep equipment like nolo. (We should charge for advertising nolo)
[img]smile.gif[/img]
post #35 of 57
Swonger is a bootguy here in Los Angeles. He has a shop off Ventura Blvd. In The Valley.

here

[ July 19, 2002, 07:18 AM: Message edited by: ryan ]
post #36 of 57
A bit off the topic but.....

You can expect a lot more "bang for the buck" if you buy boots from the fitter and get the "fitting" as part of the purchase. If you buy some yard sale boots and then go in to get fitted at the hourly / service rate, you may expect to pay a lot and may get second class service as well. I would hate to have $400 bucks worth of foot beds and boot fitting into a 5 year old pair of cheap boots. True, a "good" fitter would look to you as a prespective customer of new boots based on your satisfaction. But geeze, why push it? Just tell the boot fitter your budget and go with the recomendation.
Foot beds are always "extra"$$, but boots without them feel like a hard floor instead of a kid glove.

CalG
post #37 of 57
Thread Starter 
$400 for footbeds and fitting? That's crazy. If that's what the boot doctors in your area are charging, no wonder people balk at getting their boots worked on.
post #38 of 57
Ok, I didn't see this topic until right now...

hehe, I love nolo saying "It seemed like a good topic to spin off, and I hope BK doesn't mind getting all this advice."

Yeah, I sure don't mind lol. I love getting all this advice. It's very very cool.

Ok, Yes, obviously this topic is about me and my decisions...thing is, as far as I can tell, my boots are fine...? I don't notice any problems/issues? Does it feel nice to take them off at the end of the day? Hell yeah, but I don't know anyone that doesn't think that (cept nolo was it?)

They don't hurt, but nolo says the allignment is bad or something...I don't know what he means by that.

I live in minneapolis...anyone know anyone around here?

If I can get a deal on skis (either at a ski shop or ebay or whatever) there is a great possibility I could do both.

What about just getting footbeds? Would they transfer over to new boots if I got them?

Man, you guys are full of so much good advice.
post #39 of 57
Oh, here's the link to the original topic that spurred this, it has like 8 videos of my skiing if you wanna see it for yourself...

LINK

I would look at the whistler1, four, and alta2 I guess to get a feeling of my skiing. In alta 2 i'm on the right.

[ July 19, 2002, 09:39 AM: Message edited by: bicyclekick ]
post #40 of 57
Quote:
Originally posted by nolo:
$400 for footbeds and fitting? That's crazy. If that's what the boot doctors in your area are charging, no wonder people balk at getting their boots worked on.
Well, I paid about $800 (actually, I think more like $850) for a pair of $400 boots and bootfitting at Green Mountain Orthotics Lab. Was it too much money? I dont know, maybe. Was it the best $800 I've ever spent on ski equipment? Hell yes. I might even do it again this year. The boots are not perfect, but I think Ive learned enough from them that now I can get boots that will allow me to ski pain free all the time.
post #41 of 57
I believe I paid just over $800 with a discount on my Rossi Race 1's, custom beds and custom fit two seasons ago. It was me who dosn't feel the need to rip my boots off at the end of the day. If that says something about my comfort level on the hill, as it should, I will do it again next pair of boots I buy. But, if you boot fits, pick up the skis. Waste of money, not in my mind.
post #42 of 57
Alright, I double posted. Heres the deal, thought we would still be able to delete individual posts, but not entire threads? Guess I was wrong. Anyway, to any of the moderators, please feel free to delete this if you so choose.

Whos a schmuck? This guy!

[ July 19, 2002, 10:15 AM: Message edited by: AltaSkier ]
post #43 of 57
nolo:

There was a thread a while back about boot fitters. The result was a list of good boot fitters throughout the country. But with the search function out of commission, I can't find the thread now. Claude Swonger was on the list and my dealings with him have been very good. He knows his stuff and is willing to help in any way possible, whether you are local or at a distance.

Can someone help out with the bootfitter thread?

AC, or dchan could you post that thread alongside the instructor thread?

My original point was just to have BK see a good boot fitter, now. With lots of last years stuff clogging the sale isles and new gear on the way, the boot fitter will likely have a good reason to move the stuff for a good price and may be willing to do some boot fitting/analysis for free or a lower price since it is the off season.

Mark
post #44 of 57
Here's the link to the bootfitters thread.
http://www.epicski.com/cgi-bin/ultim...c&f=1&t=001994
post #45 of 57
damn, too bad there aren't any remotely near me...

(i live in minneapolis)
post #46 of 57
ryan,

You mean, the, valley.

"I'm like this, but she's like that. Then, I'm so not going to that party..."

post #47 of 57
BK:

The list is full of good fitters, but this is not the only way to find a good fitter.

Here are some ideas to help you find a good fitter. Call your local shops and interview the fitters in each shop. Call a local ski resort instructor or other professional and find out where the pros go. Ask your friends, highschool ski coach, etc. Beat the bush, burn some shoe rubber, find your own answers, become the local expert on where to go in your town.

Let us know what you find.
post #48 of 57
Ok, I went down to a local ski shop (joes sporting goods (in sait paul)) and was actually a tad surprised this ~20-23 year old guy really knew his shit.

At first I asked if they had any master boot fitters that could spend a few hours with me sometime soon and he said he could, or there are 2 other guys, one is the manager of the department.

I wasn't planning on trying on any boots, but I figured what the hell and I tried a pair on that were too narrow, so he recomended I try some salomon's, and then recomended the salomon xwave 8's. First I tried the 27.5's on and they felt really good, but MAYBE a tad long, so I grabbed the 27's and I've never fallen in love with a boot like that. Felt absolutely great.

Of course I didn't buy it, I'm gonna try on more probably on tuesday and see what else there is, but I wanted to ask if the salomon xwave 8 was a good boot? I know it's all personal preferance, but...

Also, the only thing that was maybe not next to perfect was the heel could maybe use a little more padding, which he said they have something they can insert? I'm not really familiar with it...

He also said they sell custom footbeds for 50-150 bucks, although the other two guys can help me with that...

If you haven't read before, I'm a pretty normal advanced skier taht skis mostly blacks, a FEW double's, and doesn't overly care about speed or groomers a lot.

Any recomendations to try on?

Shit, this is getting really expensive! ah!! They said they could give me a pakage discount if i get ski's/boots/bindings or whatever...

Yikes. They did have the 2003 k2 axis x in...but 750! damn. He did say nobody should pay retail though, so maybe i can talk him down. He really likes the volkl vertigo g3 (which he's skied) and recomended that, or the rosignol bandit xx(he hasn't skied, but has heard). He said he didn't really know anything about the k2 axis x, but one of the other guys skies the k2 axis x pro so he could talk to me.

Anyhow, it was really nice to go down there...

Any thoughts/recomendations?

/edit I just went online to basinski and they have the 2001/2002 model of the xwave 8 in my size for $336. The 2003 model is $550 at my ski shop (retail)

Think the 2001/2 is much different?
/edit

[ July 28, 2002, 03:48 PM: Message edited by: bicyclekick ]
post #49 of 57
One thing to check is that the smaller boot is actually a different shell size. They will usually have two size boots that share a shell and the smaller one has a plumped up liner. If you are in the "smaller" boot, the liner will pack out and it will end up fitting just like the larger boot.

[ July 29, 2002, 07:21 AM: Message edited by: epic ]
post #50 of 57
If you had tried on boots at a ski shop and identified the proper size for you in the model you want, and then saw a new pair (same model) on ebay-would you buy 'em?(they are less than pro-form)

[ July 29, 2002, 08:02 AM: Message edited by: BG ]
post #51 of 57
Quote:
Originally posted by BG:
If you had tried on boots at a ski shop and identified the proper size for you in the model you want, and then saw a new pair (same model) on ebay-would you buy 'em?(they are less than pro-form)
I'm all about saving money. But if I took the bootfitters time, more than say 10 minutes, I'd buy from them. Lets say that 25% of their 'customers' go shop online after taking sales clerks time for fitting. How can they stay in business? If your going to do this, at least let them know what your up to before you take their time. Also, if you buy a boot from a shop, after sale adjustments are free at a good shop, not so if you buy elsewhere.

Now, if you know exactly what you want, size, model, etc. Lets say replacing an exact boot as your current boot, why not? Skis, if you already know exactly what you want, online is a great way to save money.
post #52 of 57
Quote:
Originally posted by AltaSkier:
</font><blockquote>quote:</font><hr />Originally posted by BG:
[qb]If you had tried on boots at a ski shop and identified the proper size for you in the model you want, and then saw a new pair (same model) on ebay-would you buy 'em?(they are less than pro-form)
I'm all about saving money. But if I took the bootfitters time, more than say 10 minutes, I'd buy from them. Lets say that 25% of their 'customers' go shop online after taking sales clerks time for fitting. How can they stay in business? If your going to do this, at least let them know what your up to before you take their time. Also, if you buy a boot from a shop, after sale adjustments are free at a good shop, not so if you buy elsewhere.</font>[/quote]Yeah, when I go in there tomorrow I plan on saying that I can get it for $336 online, and I'll bet any money they drop their price, cause the guy who spent a few minutes with me said it's stupid to pay retail. They don't make commision btw, but rather 'points' towards free stuff from the company.

Yeah, I can see how some people wouldn't be OVERLY conscious about money, but I'm in college, 100-200 bucks is a nice chunk of money! Remember I was only going to buy one thing? And you guys talked me into both?! I need to save where I can.

I'll see what kind of package they can give me, they also said there would be a sale at the end of september of 20% probably. I'll see if I can get like a pre-sale deal cause I wont be in town in september...

We'll see.

[ July 29, 2002, 09:18 AM: Message edited by: bicyclekick ]
post #53 of 57
If people don't buy from the shops where these pros work they won't be there to provide service. Customer service is what they provide and they have to make a profit to do that.
A good "performance" fit requires a good bootfitter. You can't get footbrds that work on the internet, they have to be custom made and fit to your boots.
Gilboa works with Pierce in the Twin Cities. Most of the coaches and athletes are quite satisfied with their work.
post #54 of 57
Quote:
Gilboa works with Pierce in the Twin Cities. Most of the coaches and athletes are quite satisfied with their work.[/QB]
Jigga wha?

Is that a master boot fitter or what?

I completely understand the point you guys are trying to make, that's why it's tough, but cmon now, I don't have much money. I don't want you're sympathy for not having much money, I do want a little understanding of why I would want to save a few hundred bucks.

Think back to when you were in college.
post #55 of 57
If I were you, I would buy them online. Thats a huge price difference. And you can still go get a custom footbed from them if you wish.
post #56 of 57
I just purchased a pair of X Wave 10's for my son at Wildernest Sports in Teton Village (Jackson Hole). They have last years models listed at about 350-380 and were willing to come down (to about 325). They also have X Wave 8's but I don't remember the price (obviously less than the 10's). We ended up purchasing a pair of demos (very near new) from last year. They were listed at $291 and they came down appreciable from there. They took an additional $25 off since we weren't going to do any fitting there (they don't make the type of "soft" footbeds I think are the best). We will have the bootfitter we work with at Solitude/Snowbird (Steve Bagley/Superior Ski) make the footbeds and I am pretty sure he will fit the boot at the same time (actually I think he will prefer it that way). There's not much initial fitting necessary for my son except for heating and forming the liner (we've been looking at this boot for a good while). I would think you could get the new 8's for under $300 this way and if they have demos (???) perhaps as low as $200.

I would suggest you give Nathan a call at Wildernest and tell him you talked to me (the guy who bought the demo 10's for his son) and see if he can do something similar for you. Shipping would only be $10 or so. Then, find yourself a GREAT bootfitter to build you some footbeds and fit the boot. They may or may not charge you a little extra for the bootfitting but I know that many will not. If you are going to be in SLC I am sure Steve Bagley would be happy to work with you. I can give him a call if you want me to help you set something up.
post #57 of 57
Very interesting Si.

I'll defenetly think about calling Nathan, or perhaps setting up a time with that bootfitter in slc.

Thanks.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Ski Instruction & Coaching