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WWJMD

post #1 of 23
Thread Starter 
Hello one and all,

Lets cut right to the chase.

I want to ''break on through to the other side''...

More specifically, as I live (currently but temporarily, in PA) in an area without a lot, or really any 'challenging' terrain, and because I have 3 big trips coming up in the next few months, and because I want to be able to confidently ski the stuff I see in the TRs around here... my 'project', is to contribute my own TRs that are in leauge with the ones I see here.

I learned to ski in High School, pretty late compared to most all of my friends, and I haven't skiied regularly since my freshman year of college. I've hit Big Sky every year because I love Montana and there is a yearly conference there I can get my office to pay for. This year I've been up 9 times and each time I'm trying to push it more and more. I've found that I can ski anything around here (not saying much perhaps) but want to do more when I'm in Breckenridge and then Whistler-Blackcomb in March.

To replace my high school era Rossignols I bought a pair of Volkl Tigershark 10 foots but they are just 79mm underfoot. I'm open to buying another pair because I already feel that I've started to really outgrow these... but my old Rossi E250's (c.1986) certainly weren't up the challenge.

So... down to the idea of 'breaking through'...

Any specific recommendations on skis... I'm sure everyone has personal opinions, and there obviously isn't 'One' correct answer or else we would all be on the same sticks.... but when it comes to above the tree-line, off-piste, big-mountain, freeriding... any general recommendations on width, turn radius, material, etc.

When it comes to taking the plunge down one's first 40 degree and then 45 and 50 degree slopes... is it just as simple as 'go for it' or is there any logical way to prepare and approach it. Specifically... with Breck and W-B as my trips coming up (my first one is to Zermatt in Feb, but don't see much Euro-TRing) are there spots, like the T-bar and on down skiers left at Breck... Harmony and what not at W-B... that are good places to step it up a notch from EC, specifically PA skiing (in before 'everything in the Rockies is better than EC skiing) ?

Lastly (thanks for lasting this long) Is there anyone who is also 'newer' to this level of skiing... or more experienced people who like to 'mentor' someone who is highly motivated, and can probably keep up... who would want to hook up in Breck (first week of March) or W-B (4th week of March) ?

Thanks,

Kevin

PS... anyone who wants to share the relative misery of PA skiing.. let me know.
post #2 of 23
WOW, I take it your not a steelers fan.

50 degree? Go for it, let me know where your wife lives first.
post #3 of 23
Hopefully you will get a better response here than you did over at TGR.
post #4 of 23
Thread Starter 
That is what I was hoping, but so far no go. It really seems that there should be a ton of people looking for others to group up with, or have something to at least talk about or share.... I never would have thought it would be so hard to get some feedback.
post #5 of 23
What I hear you saying is that I haven't spent too much time on skis but I like to name drop.

Help me because I'm confused.

Okie Dokie! Rent/Demo at the big time destination resorts and take a lesson with an instructor who really works you and just doesn't shine your ego.

Ten foots aye?
post #6 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by Spaceace414 View Post
Hopefully you will get a better response here than you did over at TGR.
Yeah, hopefully.
post #7 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by prickly View Post
Yeah, hopefully.
Can someone link me the thread? I hate myself to be amused at maggots.
post #8 of 23
Is there a question here?

Are you looking for advice on HOW to ski steeps? Cause there are plenty of threads here on that...

Are you looking for people to ski with? Cause there's a gathering/get together forum for that...

Are you looking for a new reccomendation for skis because you feel as if you have "outgrown" your tigershark 10ft's? Why do you think this? How are they not performing when you wish they would? There is a gear forum where you will get better reccomendations for new, um, gear.

post #9 of 23
I think the question is "How do I get to the next level?" Seems reasonable to me so I don't know why you can't get answers from anybody. So here you go....

Find better skiers than yourself to ski with. Follow them.

Take a bump lesson.

Start rec/beer league racing at your local hill.

Buy better boots before another pair of skis and get fitted.

Find ways to make skiing your local hill more challenging. How about on one ski?

Take video of yourself skiing and post it here. Ask for MA.
post #10 of 23
Not sure exactly what it is your asking?

I got lost between half your life story and ripping on the PA.

Stoke is what you do, not where you are or what you have.
post #11 of 23
Hi Kevin,

The key to stepping it up on steeps is being aware of the consequences of a mistake. You start with open slopes and short pitches of steep--where if you fall your slide will be short and will not be terminated by an immovable object--and work your way up from there. Approach steeps gradually and make sure your technique is solid before venturing onto bigger slopes. Be aware of snow conditions and aspect. Know where you are going and don't get trapped on a slope that is beyond your ability. Until you get some experience, avoid skiing runs that you can't scope out in advance.

Learn how to do hop turns and pedal hop turns and then try not to use them. You need these turns for venturing onto the steeps because they are a very safe turn that will bail you out if you get in over your head. You don't want to use them because hopping is a crutch that allows you to turn without ever commiting your CoM to the inside. The ideal turn involves releasing your edges and moving your hip down the hill. The ideal turn takes commitment, but it feels better and looks better than hopping.

Also, most people vastly over-estimate slope steepness. In-bounds slopes with more than a few turns at 40+ degrees or more are *extremely* rare.

Finally, consider going with a guide. Both Breckenridge and Whistler/Blackcomb have some very good programs to guide you into the steeps. At Breck, sign up for the Big Mountain Experience. At WB, sign up for Extremely Canadian 2-day clinics: http://www.extremelycanadian.com/clinics/clinics.htm

Whatever you do, approach steeps with a humble attitude. Don't assume you can ski something (even if its something you've skied before or its a named run on a trail map). If there are consequences to a fall and it doesn't feel right, don't drop in.
post #12 of 23
I also hear you saying that you can ski PA "powder" .... ice and hardpack.

Of course on Volkl Ti-Double-Gup 10-Footer R-Sharks, I can't imaging why.

post #13 of 23
Thread Starter 

...

Yuki:
what I was saying was, I've spent enough time on skis to be able to ski all of the black and double black that I have found in PA.... but I don't have any ego about it because its not the same as being able to ski confidently out west...

and I'm sure if I had said "I have some skis I'm thinking aren't right for what I want to do" and ''when I go out west i want to push myself'' peoples' first question would be 'what kind of skis ya got' followed by, 'where are you hoping to ski out west'


JPH:
I'm looking for someone who is skiing at a level I want to acheive to share any tips that they feel helped them take their game to the next level.

I am looking for people to ski with, and I will take another look at the 'gather' forum.

I feel like I've outgrown the Tigersharks because I don't think they are the ski for the kind of all mountain, off-piste, powder, steep areas that I want to get to. I have checked out the grear forum, and have found it to more 'classifieds' than anythign else.

MattL: Thanks, that is helpful.

Jag: As in Jag-Off??

Geoffda: thanks, solid advice. Looking into Big Mtn Exp at Breck.

Yuki: you never heard me call it powder. I call it groomed, hard, ice, and 'less than ideal'. Hence.... aw never mind.
post #14 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by mtmd70 View Post

Thanks,

Kevin

PS... anyone who wants to share the relative misery of PA skiing.. let me know.
Jan 25, 2009

Hi Kevin:

Seeing that this is your 4th post, I'd like to welcome you to EPIC ski forum. Being part of the skiing serfdom which skis PA, I don't think that I can offer you any advice on big, steep, outback skiing or skis. However, I would just like to say that two of the worlds greatest skiers started skiing on mountains with less than 400 vertical feet. One being our own Diann Roffe (presently residing near Ski Roundtop PA) and the other being, in many people's opinion, the greatest ski racer of all time, the Swede, Ingemar Stenmark. There are tons of other great skiiers coming from mountains which are vertically and terrain challenged. It's not how big the mountain which the skier skis, it is how big a heart the skier skis with. Seeing that you seem to posses a big heart, we eagerly look forward to your future exploits.

think snow,

CP
post #15 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by mtmd70 View Post
Jag: As in Jag-Off??
Actually...yes.



Quote:
Originally Posted by CharlieP View Post
I would just like to say that two of the worlds greatest skiers started skiing on mountains with less than 400 vertical feet.
...and a crap load of well known professionals.
post #16 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by mtmd70 View Post
JPH:
I'm looking for someone who is skiing at a level I want to acheive to share any tips that they feel helped them take their game to the next level.
This is diffucult to do, not having seen you ski. Could you post a video of you skiing the steepest terrain you can find in PA? One of those double diamonds that you feel comfortable on maybe?

Quote:
I am looking for people to ski with, and I will take another look at the 'gather' forum.
Good idea. You can start a thread there with where and when you will be, then see if anyone else will be there too.

Quote:
I feel like I've outgrown the Tigersharks because I don't think they are the ski for the kind of all mountain, off-piste, powder, steep areas that I want to get to. I have checked out the grear forum, and have found it to more 'classifieds' than anythign else.
OK, when you say you have "outgrown" the ski it implies that it will not perform up to the level that you are skiing it on it's intended terrain. If you are finding that it is not appropriate for the terrain that you want to ski, this is a different problem. If the Tigershark works for you on the hardpack, keep it. Then you can buy a different ski for the powder/big mountain stuff that you want to get into. You want to look at stuff that is probably longer, wider, straighter (less sidecut) and stiffer than your tigershark.

BTW, there is a GEARSWAP forum, which is for the classifieds... and then there is a Ski Gear Discussion forum which is for general questions, like "Which big mountain ski would be good for me." There is ALSO a Member Gear Review forum where you can read what other members thought of the skis that you might be considering.
post #17 of 23
Ok, the OP was a bit long and rambling and like a few others here I'm not sure what is being asked. But it seemed to me that the OP was looking to head out west and ski. He feels like he's a strong skier and wants to step it up, and may wants to get together with some locals. Yeah, there are other areas for each of those but then he'd get blasted for the 4-5 posts he'd have to do.

MTMD70 - here's my suggestions. Read some gear reviews then either demo while your out here or buy something that excites you. Odds are that demo-ing will give you more options and a chance to try different skis. The snow conditions out here can change drastically, it can be hard and crusty one day then soft and deep the next. Odds are you'd like two different skis. You want to take it to the next level, nice.

Find some terrain that will challenge you and approach it. Don't go directy to the most difficult lines on the mountain unless you are 100% sure you're ready. The east coast skiing you've done can make you a great skier. Lot's of east coast guys come out here with fantastic fundamentals and then have to learn powder fundamentals. That's way easier than having to learn the basics so you'll be fine.

As for skiing with some locals. There are tons of us. We're in every town on every run. Keep making posts here, get to know a few people then when you have a better grasp on where and when you're going send some PM's somebody will ski with you for sure
post #18 of 23
what part of Pa?

also WWJMD? what the hell is the "M" for.
post #19 of 23
Well, here is a movie of the claimed steepest run in PA.


And the east wall at A-basin.


You decide if you just want to "go for it", but whatever you do, film it.
post #20 of 23
Thread Starter 
Bushwacker:
Q: What Would Jim Morrison Do?
A: ''break on through to the other side..."
And I live in Central PA near Williamsport.
Karp:
Yeah, White Ligtning at Sno Mountain (Montage). The fact that the steepest run is lit for night skiing is kind of funny I think. When I skiied it (only been to S.M. once) it had some nice relativly well developed moguls... but the fact it is a Double Black (even if just compared to the rest of that hill) is what makes me not develope too much ego about having ''skiied blacks and double blacks'' in PA.
You seem like you might want me to film it for everyone's amusement... as in, look at the jong crash and burn... hahaha... that sure would be funny.
post #21 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by mtmd70 View Post
Bushwacker:
Q: What Would Jim Morrison Do?
A: ''break on through to the other side..."
post #22 of 23

Breakthrough

mtmd70. Here are some KISS principle answers to your questions.

Can you do this on your home hill. Start down the fall line making a med or short radius turn, make 10 linked turns and not gain any speed. Skiing steep terrain can mean many things and necessitate the whole bag of tricks. Usually however if you can control your speed and not warp out this will enable you to sucessfully complete the ride. Do you use the terrain features when you ski instead of just making mechanical turns? Can you kick turn and do hop turns? You can practice both of these on your home turf.

Should you just launch yourself down the hill. NO unless you want to pay the hospital bill. Can you self arrest? Bob Peters had a good thrread on self arrest about one year ago, use the search function to find. In the beginning avoid icy steeps as they can be the hardest and most unforgiving to your technique and your body.

As previously stated there are a lot of posts on skiing the steeps here on epic but the above suggestions will get you started.
Good luck, welcome to Epic, and Wear a Helmet and think self arrest when you need to.
post #23 of 23
Thread Starter 
P No ID... I appreciate the good feedback.

Speaking of the 10 linked turns, with a slide in the turn I can certianly maintain speed, but with carving, esp if a bit steeper, then I can't maintain speed as well as I would like. Either way I don't warp out, but can get going faster to where I do need to slide a bit in a turn or two to bleed it off. Kick turn - check. Hop turn - check, but not with much grace, I feel like I am muscling my way through it with more force than finesse.

As far as self-arrest, I did watch a couple of videos, and my ex left her handcuffs when she moved out.

I do certianly wear a helmet.

Thanks again to folks who took time to give some feedback.

K
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