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shredding peanut butter

post #1 of 14
Thread Starter 
So whose skis are shredding the sticky, cut up, set up, condenced, rained on, blown on, sluffed, and chunky-cloddy snow out there these days? And whose ain't?

My contribution: the B-Squads have the bash and the float to tear it up.
post #2 of 14
165 cm Fischer WC SC -not too bad, but a little too turny for deeper peanut butter.
208 cm Kästle SG - will go through anything, but like to carve at high speeds; they don't like to go sideways.
190 cm Volant Machete G - very good on anything except smooth ice.
post #3 of 14
That's why they recalled all the peanut butter
post #4 of 14
K2 Anti-piste.

6" heavy wet snow at the top, 4" mank in the middle & rain at the bottom.

Tip Rocker, best invention since peanut butter.

JF
post #5 of 14
We've got good snow back here. But I usually turn to my old Mantras for help with PB. OTOH, they were too narrow for real Tahoe sludge last time I encountered it. I'd suspect something wider with metal, like the Argos or P4, would be the ticket.
post #6 of 14
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by crgildart View Post
That's why they recalled all the peanut butter
That's rich, perfect. Ours is laying on a sticky layer that we're hoping will stick to the old snow layer.

4ster, how does the tip perform, exactly, to deal with those conditions, and where is that sick hut, roughly? The Squad tip is specifically designed to be heavy, stiff, and damp: the idea is to cut through without turbulence, not plane over.

Here I'm seeing the LP, Mantra, B-Squad powering through the crud, but that's cause those are skis I recognize. What else is working, of the newer more progressive designs?
post #7 of 14
My Fischer Atuas (186, 96 under foot) make heavy garbage fun. They are now called Misfit, but they're the same ski. I have a pair of Elan 888s (185, 88) and the Fischers out-perform them in crud, especially heavy stuff.
post #8 of 14
Thread Starter 

what makes them work better

Quote:
Originally Posted by Posaune View Post
My Fischer Atuas (186, 96 under foot) make heavy garbage fun. They are now called Misfit, but they're the same ski. I have a pair of Elan 888s (185, 88) and the Fischers out-perform them in crud, especially heavy stuff.

would you speculate as to why the Fisher skis better?

I checked a pair on demo day, and noticed carrying them to funitel, that they were very, very heavy. It was already 2pm, and I was way tired to even contemplate riding those boards. (I probably was wrong and should have taken advantage of the opportunity.) the rep said skiing was a gravity sport, implying that heavy could be a plus.

what is the construction? tip design? side cut?

your observation is real on snow testing, not hype or wishful thinking. appreciate it.
post #9 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by davluri View Post
4ster, how does the tip perform, exactly, to deal with those conditions, and where is that sick hut, roughly? The Squad tip is specifically designed to be heavy, stiff, and damp: the idea is to cut through without turbulence, not plane over.
Don't know if I can explain exactly. I don't think the tip helps "cut through" the crud, but rather it stays above it & is not deflected easily. I skied them again today in similar conditions with the same results. They stayed on top of the untracked, & easily erased the the old tracks I crossed.

Lower on the mountain, with a little proactive move I could float over yesterdays crud ruts without getting yanked forward. Even in the rain rotted moguls I encountered the tip would ride over the crest where I would expect them to spear in.

Even on the sticky rain soaked groomers at the bottom they will carve a decent turn with just the slightest amount of guiding at initiation.

I have skied B-squads, but only for a few runs, they were really too stiff for what I like, but you are probably right about their ability to power through just about anything.

I don't think any ski sticks less than others in sticky wet snow. The only thing I've found that significantly helps glide in that stuff is really expensive flouro powder that racers use, & that only lasts for a short distance.

JF

Oh, & the sick hut is my private office .

It is protected by a cloaking device that only I have access too, high on a ridge with a beautiful view & access to some great skiing.
post #10 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by davluri View Post
would you speculate as to why the Fisher skis better?

I checked a pair on demo day, and noticed carrying them to funitel, that they were very, very heavy. It was already 2pm, and I was way tired to even contemplate riding those boards. (I probably was wrong and should have taken advantage of the opportunity.) the rep said skiing was a gravity sport, implying that heavy could be a plus.

what is the construction? tip design? side cut?

your observation is real on snow testing, not hype or wishful thinking. appreciate it.
I have no clue WHY they work better, but they do. I don't pay much attention to construction details. I just ski what I like. Sorry.

The 888s gave me some tip dive and sometimes wandered when things got heavy and tight. The Fischers have not.
post #11 of 14
In heavy snow one has to steer the skis with little sliding. Softer skis are more steerable at any speed, but too soft yields boring, sloppy performance. So medium stiffness is best. Also damper skis smooth out rough snow, so metal helps a lot.

That's why Volants, in their day, were the best crud ski. I think Head Monsters are the best crud ski today. And the 82's are a bit softer than the 88's, allowing one to ski it longer (I have 'em in 183 for crud, but the Monster 88's at 186cm were too much ski for this 150-pounder).

Also, K2's and Dynastar's seem to make skiers into heroes in tough crud.
post #12 of 14
Scott P4s are surprisingly good in glop. And not hard to ski at all.

But the im103 is the true master... but only if they have room to run.

I think something with a rockered tip would be sweet in glopy cut up crud as long as the ski was solid underfoot.

Praxis are surprisingly good in this sort of snow too and very predictable... they float over everything and there are no edges to catch...
post #13 of 14
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by crudmaster View Post
In heavy snow one has to steer the skis with little sliding. Softer skis are more steerable at any speed, but too soft yields boring, sloppy performance. So medium stiffness is best. Also damper skis smooth out rough snow, so metal helps a lot.

That's why Volants, in their day, were the best crud ski. I think Head Monsters are the best crud ski today. And the 82's are a bit softer than the 88's, allowing one to ski it longer (I have 'em in 183 for crud, but the Monster 88's at 186cm were too much ski for this 150-pounder).

Also, K2's and Dynastar's seem to make skiers into heroes in tough crud.
concur with the above; and given your login, this thread would not have been complete without your weighing in.
post #14 of 14
Fischer Misfit - according to the Fischer 08/09 catalogue I've got in front of me, the parameters are:
sandwich sidewall construction, twin tip
186cm, 129-96-119, R22/186
182cm, 128-94-117, R21/182
177cm, 127-92-115, R20/177
These links may help as well: http://www.snowrental.net/skiing/ski...cher-atua.html
http://www.fischer-ski.com/en/produc..._product=17947
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