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catching an edge... no idea why....

post #1 of 17
Thread Starter 
I've been skiing now for about 12 years, level 8-9 skiier.

I've been skiing for the past few years with not the stiffest boot. They had considerable flex in them, but they were comfortable and worked for me.

I just had my skis tuned/sharpened, and bought new boots. A fairly stiff pair, much more than my last set of boots.

Skiing the other day, every run, even green trails, any time I'd start carving, my right ski (mostly) would catch an edge and I'd almost fall.

Could it be a bad tuning? Could going to stiff boots be revealing my flaws?
post #2 of 17
Did the bootfitter adjust the canting on your boot? That would have the most direct effect on edge disengagement.
post #3 of 17
Sounds like it could be a hanging burr left from tuning. With moderate pressure, run a stone flat to each edge. Some like a gummy or dressing stone (rubber abrasive) run at the corner as a final step for polishing/smoothing the corner.
post #4 of 17
I had the same problem just few days ago. New boots (Nordica Dobi 130 pro) and freshly tuned pair of slalom skis. I felt like I cant ski anymore. Blamed canting and play with it but it made just bigger mess. At the end I took diamond stone and "retuned" skis, put canting back to zero and I was fine.
post #5 of 17
Could also be that with the stiffer boot, things are less forgiving, so errors in form reveal themselves readily.
post #6 of 17
Could be a bad tune (no bottom bevel) and possibly the new boot.

I'd have your alignment checked by your boot fitter.
post #7 of 17
How does one catch an edge while carving? I hate to say it, but I'm going with richie on this one.
post #8 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by karpiel View Post
How does one catch an edge while carving? I hate to say it, but I'm going with richie on this one.
When transitioning. The inside edge of what is becoming the downhill ski engages too early / hard in the beginning of the turn.
post #9 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by aschick View Post
When transitioning. The inside edge of what is becoming the downhill ski engages too early / hard in the beginning of the turn.
If I understand you correctly, this is a problem that most skiers would love to have. For the most part we have a lot of trouble tipping the inside ski to its little toe edge to initiate the turn. I'm going to suggest the tune on the skis might have a flat bottom bevel on your edge as another poster suggested. You can check this.

Hold the skis base to base, and press them together HARD to de-camber the ski. You should see a thin black line (gap) between the edges of two skis. If there is no line, just silver metal on metal, then you have no bottom bevel (1 degree is recommended for the recreational skier).

I find it hard to believe that if your old boots didn't have any canting done to them and your new boots also haven't been canted that you could be off enough to feel what you are describing. You'd have to be like 3 degrees bowlegged to be feeling little toe edge rocketing like you describe.

If it's just one side, try switching the right/left ski. If it stays with your foot, consider canting. If it stays with the ski, consider the tune.

-Adam
post #10 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by aschick View Post
When transitioning. The inside edge of what is becoming the downhill ski engages too early / hard in the beginning of the turn.

That would fall under user error.
post #11 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by mattjf View Post
Could it be a bad tuning? Could going to stiff boots be revealing my flaws?
Could be:
  • bad tuning (burrs on ski edge)
  • stiff boots revealing technique flaws, and/or
  • your new boots not being properly aligned, so you're on the outside edge of that ski.
Take care of the deburring (if needed) and alignment, then see if your problem goes away.

Alignment is more critical with higher-level boots but can make a great difference in your skiing. A lot of "technique errors" are really just poor alignment.
post #12 of 17
With a stiffer boot skier inputs will have a faster more direct action at the skis. If you were in a weak boot before you might have been flexing them to get some forward pressure. Doing the same thing in the stiffer boot could be leveraging the fronts of the skis causing them to hook up much faster than you have been use to. The solution is to back off the gas until you learn to handle the more sensitive inputs.

The problem could also be as others suggested.
post #13 of 17
I'm going with abertsch on this one. Early edge is a desired thing!

But in my mind, the likely culprit is whether you are balancing ON the ski, or AGAINST the ski.

It sounds as if you are just making the move to the inside of the turn without remaining balanced ON the ski, so it rails out away from you in a straight line. Then you end up having to catch yourself on your inside ski.

If you were to remain balanced ON the ski, you would be able to maintain whatever arc you so desired.

For definition sake, balancing AGAINST the ski is when during the turn, you rely on the ski and the various forces at play to hold you upright, rather than being in balance ON the ski, where you are balancing yourself, and interacting with those forces as necessary.
post #14 of 17
The way he explains it is that it sounded like it was only one direction for turn. I could have just missread it. If he's catching the inside edge, perhaps the ski's were just edged wrong.

I've had the issue the poster before me is describing, trying to turn and having it not work so well with the inside foot. I had to learn to get my foot in the right spot to get it to work when trying to carve, otherwise i'd just wipe out, or end up not skiing very well. I had to pick my inside foot up while turning to correct it, and it eventually started just being natural. Or perhaps with flexy boots, turning operated differently then it does now.
So it could be the stiff boot revealing something that you didn't do before because of how the old boots operated.
but if it was only one ski (mostly) then it could just be bad tuning.
post #15 of 17
Thread Starter 
Thanks for all the great replies.

It did tend to only happen if I was turning left, the right leg (becoming the downhill ski) would engage and I'd catch the edge. It's why I thought it could be a problem with the ski, since right turns it never happened.

I still don't discount the user flaw possibility though!

My last boots were not canted, and neither are the new ones.

I took the skis to the shop to have them check for burrs and other bad spots. They smoothed out the right ski edge, and said if it continues to let them know.

I'll be out skiing tomorrow, so I'll let you know if it has resolved. Thanks again for all the great help.
post #16 of 17
Are they ski's where you should only keep the right on the right foot and the left on the left?

If not, switch them around if you have problems.
See if its your skiing and not just your equipment. =)
We'll, it will rule out the ski's anyways.
post #17 of 17
Do you still have your old boots, that would be an easy one wouldn't it? Pop the old ones on and take a run!

Run a cloth down the ski to detect a burr.

I suspect is that they may have changed the side and base bevel on you.
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