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Purpose of 75-82 waisted ski for big guy?

post #1 of 20
Thread Starter 
I spend way to much time reading posts on here, and have seen various opinions on how wide a waist is needed to "float" in powder. I am 6'3" 245lbs, level 7 skier. I live in the east, used to travel west for one-two weeks per year, got a job, married, kids, but getting back in the groove. We ski around here (mainly wva), so I have some Head i.XRC 800, which are around 68 or 69 in the waist, I think. Getting ready to head to Co for a week in late Feb, and plan on a western trip every year.

I have been thinking about buying a western travel ski, but am thinking I wouldn't really gain anything, given my size, unless I got something 90 plus in the waist for powder days. I have skied on a 72 or so waisted ski in the east, on hard manmade stuff, and couldn't really tell any difference.

Bottom line, my travel ski would be for powder, so something over 90 or around 100 in the waist.

What purpose, if any, would a ski under 82 or 85 or so serve for someone my size. It seems to me it would just make carving harder in the east, and not really get me "floating" in powder.

Any thoughts would be appreciated. I have seen all the posts about simply demoing or renting on powder days out west, but would like to hear opinions on what benefit a 75-82 waisted ski might offer.
post #2 of 20
A ski in that range would be a great all around ski until the real powder comes out. With the current conditions out west a ski this narrow would be the ski you'd grab for the hardpacked crust we've got going on. Also, there are a lot of great skis for the bumps in that range. Basically, this would be a great ski range for groomers, bumps and doing quite a lot of the mountain.

Now, you're a big guy so you will get minimal float from a ski that narrow. I keep a ski like this around at all times, I use them in our current conditions when I don't feel like railing a GS ski. Some suggestions: Legend 8000, AC40, Monster 82, Stormrider xxl (my choice).
post #3 of 20
You are correct a 75-82 really won't help you in powder compared to a real powder ski. So you need one of those for the deep days. The question is what do you ski on the rest of the time? I would think the XRC 800 might be OK for groomers and bumps, but how about crud & off-piste? This is where the "all-mountain" ski comes into play. I find the 78-88 waist pretty good for most conditions out west. However, since you weigh about 100 lbs. more than me, I would think wider (90-94mm) would still be all-mountain. However, I think demoing is the best way to find the ideal travel ski. (I also think you will prefer something even wider for the powder days).
post #4 of 20
I ski head mojo 90's (actually 89mm underfoot) for everything including ice and other crap. They work fine I could probably venture a guess that 95mm waist skis would work about as good as mine but anything larger you could probably notice a difference on ice or crap snow. If u want a powder or crud busting ski I would'nt go any smaller than the 95 waist. Happy medium would be the old seth (kung fujas, now) or moment taho, weatah 94. Just an idea.
post #5 of 20
Thread Starter 
Thanks husker, I have eyeing the mojo 90 and wateas, both 84 and 94.
My main problem is that I have not skied any wide waisted ski, so I am apprehensive about going
wide, so to speak. My understanding is that the mojo 90 and the wateas are pretty forgiving.
post #6 of 20
I'm your size, and a ski with less than 100mm at-the-waist will not perform as intended in deep or very soft snow. This includes "crud" as found in western states.

I use a Watea 101 and find it is very easy to use in powder and carves on hard pack with very little effort.

Also consider the Blizzard Titan Argo in a 180cm as an all-mountain ski that truly floats in powder. This is a beefy ski for bigger skiers.

Michael
post #7 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by mtwhoosh View Post
Thanks husker, I have eyeing the mojo 90 and wateas, both 84 and 94.
My main problem is that I have not skied any wide waisted ski, so I am apprehensive about going
wide, so to speak. My understanding is that the mojo 90 and the wateas are pretty forgiving.
I agree with Wildcat, the Watea 84 and 94 are too soft for your size. Go up to the 101 if you want to try the Watea.

Mike
post #8 of 20
At your weight for a powder ski I would go with nothing less then a 202cm dps lotus 138 in a 3 flex.
post #9 of 20
Thread Starter 
I am sure its a good ski, but looks like a $1000 wake board. Probably not going to be able to clear that one with the boss, and might be a little over my head.
post #10 of 20
First thing here is probably for you to evaluate whether your travel ski should be heavily biased toward softer and/or deeper snow, or whether you want a jack of all trades type of thing. There is always a lot of discussion about buying a powder (ish) ski for that one yearly trip. That's all good if it snows a bunch, but if it doesn't, you won't have the best tool with you.

If you were to look at the range of skis skis under discussion, the ones suggesting a mid 80's - low 90's ski are probably closest to the mark for maximum versatility. If you get a little 6" dusting overnight, this width range will be fine. If you get significantly more than that, rent something wider. Keep in mind, that while folks who travel west often have the impression that there is a big powder dump every second or third day, that's not usually the case.

Width and length are both virtues for a bigger guy. Here in Tahoe, we regularly sell 182-187 skis of this width to folks of your size range for everyday skis. Bigger and/or more aggressive skiers will often buy the stiffer skis of course, but there is no great sacrifice made in buying a medium flex ski for you as most L-7 skiers won't ski fast enough to really need excessive stiffness. Some of those folks have something wider to go along with their daily driver, but many don't.

A very good choice for you would be the Dynastar Mythic Rider. It is 88mm wide, handles western hardpack and heavier cut up snow very well. It is stiff enough for you without being too overbearing and is manuverable enough for bumps. I think a 184 would be plenty.

SJ
post #11 of 20
Thread Starter 
Thanks a bunch Sierra Jim. I really appreciate the feedback. How about the Atomic Snoop Daddy (09, wider model) as compared to Mythic Riders for a level 7?

I know what you mean about the go West for powder expectation. I am a spoiled western powder magnet--everytime I've been in the last 16 years I've lucked into a big dump.
post #12 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by WILDCAT View Post
I'm your size, and a ski with less than 100mm at-the-waist will not perform as intended in deep or very soft snow. This includes "crud" as found in western states.

I use a Watea 101 and find it is very easy to use in powder and carves on hard pack with very little effort.

Also consider the Blizzard Titan Argo in a 180cm as an all-mountain ski that truly floats in powder. This is a beefy ski for bigger skiers.

Michael

Hey Michael,

How do you think the Watea 101 will work as a one ski quiver for the West for a level 7/8 skier 6'4" 245lbs. Do these handle the
bumps ok when necessary? Thanks for anymore details on the Watea 101
post #13 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by mtwhoosh View Post
Thanks a bunch Sierra Jim. I really appreciate the feedback. How about the Atomic Snoop Daddy (09, wider model) as compared to Mythic Riders for a level 7?

I know what you mean about the go West for powder expectation. I am a spoiled western powder magnet--everytime I've been in the last 16 years I've lucked into a big dump.
The '09 Snoop is a very nice, soft snow oriented ski. If you are looking for a twin tip, it would be a fine choice for a L-7 of possibly up to 200 lbs or so. In it's longest size (192??) it might be OK for your weight as well.

SJ
post #14 of 20
I guess it all depends on what you are skiing (snow, I mean). You are going to need something alot wider and longer than someone my size. With that said, you don't need a huge ski to ski blower pow at a steep resort, you do need one to ski the cascade cement that we get at Flatchelor, however.

My bet would be try some stuff and see what works, and what doesn't. And, asking bigger guys what works for them is a good bet. Being that this is your "travel" ski, I am guessing you need all-around performance, not deep-snow specific, unless you are heli-skiing. I have yet to ski untracked snow at any resort for more than a few runs, and later in the day it is tracked out or even soft bumps, which means you need a versatile, wide ski.

I like the Watea 101 suggestion. It is pretty versatile and will give you good float. As SJ also said, something in the range he suggested is super versatile, but not the best choice if it really dumps. You can always rent boards for those kinds of days. I am way smaller than you, but if I had to have 1 ski for Utah, it would be something probably right at 90mm underfoot that was a jack of trades. Skiing 2 feet of fresh last year (same time as the Gathering) was perfect for me: I neither wanted nor needed anything wider, and narrower, stiffer skis would have been alot more work. Utah snow parts like the Red Sea! Since you have around 90lbs on me, figure on stepping that up to something wider or much longer for the same performance. I actually had a pair of Watea 101's on that trip as well as my Elan 888's, but never pulled the Wateas out of the car.
post #15 of 20
Since you are only going out west for a week I wouldnt bother spending 500-800 on a new set of skis only to find when you get there it hast snowed for week. In that case your skis you have will do fine. I would just rent the ski that is best for the conditions when you arrive!! Bring your boots and poles but rent the ski of your choise when you get there. If its snowed 3ft the day you arrive then rent something truly made for deep snow 110+ under foot. If it hasnt snowed much say 6inches to a foot just rent some 100 under foots. No new snow get some crud busting carving machines like the Nortics Hellbents or jetfuels. as an example for just soft groomers with side crud capabilities. For 130 a week or less each year you can have the very best for the conditions of the day each day your there. Not to mention you wont have to pack your skis cross country.
The rentals these days are the same high end skis on the racks at the best stores. You can rent just about anything from pontoons and hellbents to Im88,s to park skis. Name your poison. I would concentrate on what skis are best these days for your size in the three main conditions,icy,soft groomers with little powder and deeper powder. Tell us were your going to ski and some one will help you find a repratable ski shop that has you covered for your trip. Reserve some skis based on the forcast for that area a few days in advance. You can always swap them when you get there if the forcast was wrong. At least if your reserving in advance your chances of getting what you realy need are beter.
post #16 of 20
Thread Starter 
thanks for all the input. Will be in Winter Park late February. I have looked online, and don't see a very exciting demo selection, although it looked like Skibrokers (?) had a decent selection of demos. It looked like the shops in the new Village had a limited selection, but maybe not all were listed.

Anyway--any good demo shop suggestions at WP?
post #17 of 20
I think dawgs idea of demoing and seeing what works is a good one. This is really the way to go. As far as UT pow parting like the red sea... I have had about 3 face shots this year. And I am on day #15. Its been mostly wind destroyed rhime and heavy wet stuff for me. Tomorrow might be the day...

IMO as a guy north of 200lbs...

If you go with a medium / stiff crud buster around 90mm under foot you will be in charge on firmer crud and lighter chop. Those on the medium flexing side will be great in bumps too. But these ones probably will have some issues in deep pow and fresh soft snow, especially if you don't know how to ski pow 2-footed like on skinny skis. The extra width helps with balance... but it won't be like a real fat ski in pow. Examples: IM88, mojo 90, AC50, Jetfuel, 4frnt MSP, PE / extreme,

If you get a Medium-Soft flexing ski around 105-120 under foot you will by $$$$ in pow and most soft snow. But you might over power the skis a bit or maybe want extra stability at speed. Examples: Scott P4, Sanook, Coomba, Goats,

I would go for a fairly big ski (around 105-120 underfoot) and a medium to stiffer flex. Stiff flex for stability and performance on firmer snow. Also look for something fun shape with tip rocker or flat camber will give better soft snow performance than you would get from a conventional stiff flexing ski with out giving up too much as an every day ride. Examples: Katana, 4frnt EHP, Obseth, Motherships, etc...
post #18 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by tromano View Post
I think dawgs idea of demoing and seeing what works is a good one. This is really the way to go. As far as UT pow parting like the red sea... I have had about 3 face shots this year. And I am on day #15. Its been mostly wind destroyed rhime and heavy wet stuff for me. Tomorrow might be the day...
Come to Oregon. You will realize how lucky you have it This crap around here seriously reminds me of skiing through moist mochi. Then again, this hasn't been a great season for Oregon or Utah.
post #19 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by vaportrail View Post
Hey Michael,

How do you think the Watea 101 will work as a one ski quiver for the West for a level 7/8 skier 6'4" 245lbs. Do these handle the
bumps ok when necessary? Thanks for anymore details on the Watea 101
The Watea 101 does very well on groomed slopes and in deep powder. I am very happy with its crud performance too, but the ski does feel soft and light: most hard-charging crud skiers want a beefy, "bulldozer" feel in crud. The Watea 101 feels stable, but does not feel totally anchored in variable snow.

High altitude moguls were were easy on the 101. As long as the moguls are typical Utah or Colorado moguls, the ski is easy to use. Here the light and lively feel is a benefit. Concrete-like moguls will be more difficult , but not impossible.

As a one ski quiver for a big guy our size, the ski is great. I would also consider the Blizzard Titan Argo in a 187cm.

Michael
post #20 of 20
The answer to the original question wrt someone 245 pounds is "none whatsoever" IMO.

Following up in the direction tromano suggested, I'd view something like a Katana as an all mountain baseline. On the conventional side look at the Huge Trouble genre as well. Personally I'd be biased toward a 189 Hell Bent given the described context.
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