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1st timer - ski attire - Page 2

post #31 of 51

merino wool

Don't wear synthetics. The keep you hot in the lodge and chilled on the lift. Merino wool as a base layer and any wool as a mid layer is best. The mid layer is less critical. Icebreaker, Smartwool and Ibex make great products. Other wools work as well but itch more. If the pure merino bothers your skin use Outdoor Research's blend. Alpaca wool may be the itchiest, even as a mid layer.
Never wear down on the slopes. I bought a down coat and after 200 yards was already sweating. Fine for walking around town.
Skiing at Jackson Hole last year it was -8. I wasn't cold skiing or on the lift and wasn't hot in the lodges yet I'm slim with little body fat.
Capilene is the best synthetic but just isn't close to wool.
post #32 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nobody View Post
Cowboy Hat? Who's wearing cowboy hats?


But I'm sure many can and will outski me (not that I really care, I'll look at them better skiers as examples to follow)
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Billy_Kidd
post #33 of 51
I wore far to much my first time. We all our different, but it was made to sound out like i might get cold, instead I soaked a fleece pullover and my jacket. No I didn't go down the bunny hill, I might have got cold with the lack of activity to do that.

I personally, at 170-180lbs and 6'3, wear a muscle shirt, an underarmor shirt, a regular long sleeve button up, long underware, jeans and my ski pants and ski coat. My ski pants are lined, but my legs never over heat, I do get warm on my back.
A good helmet to cover your ears helps too.
People might say no helmet, but my second time out I had an unexpected fall trying out going up the side of a hill for fun. I found out how to hit your head unexpected. Even with the helmet, it jared me a little bit. And a pair of goggles can help. It's been around 10F every time i've went out with this on, and i've never got to hot, and never got cold, except for when i got snow in my pants from sliding, and didn't do the wiggles, so i had to sit on it up the lift. eeep!!!!
Then the stuff stuck to the fleece lining in my ski pants. heh. That was a pain.

I cannot reccomend any clothing, but remember that it might be easier to take an extra shirt off instead of being cold and having to go find a cold shirt to put on. Just make sure you take it off before you get soaked like i did wearing the fleece. I normally get cold easily, so i had that on, skiing is great exercise!!! You will burn lots of energy. So try and keep the heat you make in, but not too much. =)
post #34 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by dumpy View Post
Thanks Dumpy, I'm aware of Billy Kidd. He probably got the idea from me


Me too, even if not a first time, constantly start with too much on me...
The onion layer theory, I'd say...
post #35 of 51
Thread Starter 
The reason I was going to go to Blue Mountain is because I plan on going with a ski club (travelling), and based on what I've seen, they have lessons for beginners as well.

Ok, so here's what I've got planned for the upper body:

Layer 1: Base (possibly an undershirt because my local Wal-Mart has run out of those specialized base layer shirts, the brand is Athletic Works)

Layer 2: A sweater

Layer 3: A spring type of jacket made of 100% polyester

Layer 4: A light-medium ski jacket that appears to be waterproof (both the shell and lining are made of 100% nylon)

As for the bottoms, howabout:

Layer 1: Longjohns

Layer 2: Track pants

Layer 3: Thin/Light athletic pants that are shiny.
post #36 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by sp88dc View Post
The reason I was going to go to Blue Mountain is because I plan on going with a ski club (travelling), and based on what I've seen, they have lessons for beginners as well.

Ok, so here's what I've got planned for the upper body:

Layer 1: Base (possibly an undershirt because my local Wal-Mart has run out of those specialized base layer shirts, the brand is Athletic Works)

Layer 2: A sweater

Layer 3: A spring type of jacket made of 100% polyester

Layer 4: A light-medium ski jacket that appears to be waterproof (both the shell and lining are made of 100% nylon)

As for the bottoms, howabout:

Layer 1: Longjohns

Layer 2: Track pants

Layer 3: Thin/Light athletic pants that are shiny.
This sounds fine, just make sure the pants are waterproof. If not you can buy some cheap snowpants at SportsAuthority or Modells. I remember seeing some there a few years ago for $19.
post #37 of 51
Just in case you're interested, I just got a Sierra Trading Post catalog that has base layers for under $10. The brand is Medalist, which I don't know anything about. The items are made out of polypropylene...I used to buy capacitors made from that, don't know if I've ever worn it. I've been happy with the Wickers stuff I've bought from them, which they still have for just a few dollars per item more than the Medalist stuff.
FYI.
post #38 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by Virtus_Probi View Post
Just in case you're interested, I just got a Sierra Trading Post catalog that has base layers for under $10. The brand is Medalist, which I don't know anything about. The items are made out of polypropylene...I used to buy capacitors made from that, don't know if I've ever worn it. I've been happy with the Wickers stuff I've bought from them, which they still have for just a few dollars per item more than the Medalist stuff.
FYI.
I think I have some medalist under garments......that being said I have some highest end under gear and lowest end, and they all work equally well.
post #39 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by skeeee View Post
Don't wear synthetics. The keep you hot in the lodge and chilled on the lift. Merino wool as a base layer and any wool as a mid layer is best. The mid layer is less critical. Icebreaker, Smartwool and Ibex make great products. Other wools work as well but itch more. If the pure merino bothers your skin use Outdoor Research's blend. Alpaca wool may be the itchiest, even as a mid layer.
Never wear down on the slopes. I bought a down coat and after 200 yards was already sweating. Fine for walking around town.
Skiing at Jackson Hole last year it was -8. I wasn't cold skiing or on the lift and wasn't hot in the lodges yet I'm slim with little body fat.
Capilene is the best synthetic but just isn't close to wool.
EEP! you bring down the sheep herders wrath!!! Rawr.

Alpaca isn't wool! Hate hearing that. Anyways. Alpaca fibers are way warmer then a just base wool by itself, but you cannot spin alpaca, so you have to mix it with wool to spin it. Alpaca generally isn't itchy, but everyone's sensitivity varies. people who say a fine wool is itchy are just crazy. It takes 30 microns to poke your skin enough to make it itch. A good fine wool like a marino or a rambouillet have a micron of around 18-24. Very rarely do sheep micron at 18, but good marinos average 19-21ish.
Now difference between cheep wool and expensive wool, or well we should say fine wool, cause you shoudlnt' have to pay millions for good wool.
Cheap wool is a coarser wool, which will still keep you warm, but you might get itchy. Finer wools still wick, and still breath, but are also warmer then coarser wools. Mixing something like Cashmiere or alpaca hair, or even angora hair can increase the properties of the yarn to make a warmer apparel.
Any more wool questions i'd gladly answer via PM. =)
post #40 of 51
Thread Starter 
And also, what type of socks should I have on?
post #41 of 51
You guys asking are getting too involved here. He doesn't need all the gear a regular skier needs, he wont be sweating up a storm and he wont be skiing from the peak where it is much colder. All he needs is waterproof pants and regular layers for the winter, because he will undoubtedly make contact with the snow.
post #42 of 51
Blue mountain On
I think Ice skates and a rain suit should cover most of the weather in Collingwood
post #43 of 51
Check the weather before you go, and if it's basically normal weather for Collingwood (0 to -15) what you describe will be fine. You will only want one jacket. If it's really mild (above 0) you may want the light jacket, make sure it's water proof. If it's below -15 that is really cold at Blue Mountain as the wind blows straight off the BAy and up the hill so make sure you also have a neck dickie, hat and very warm gloves. Those polar fleece zip ups with a turntle neck and undershirt are the combo I find warmest when the temperature dips. First time skiers are usually only heading half way up the hill at most (Magic Carpet at Big Baby/O hill, South Base LOdge), is my favorite spot for starting beginners. After learning to turn at the carpet you can ride a lift half way up. It's alot of work to learn to ski and if temps are in the normal range, you will probably over heat as you'll be very active picking yourself up, over and over.

PS. Not sure when you're going, but this is Men's Week and it's $39.00 for a day/night lift ticket, starting Monday.
post #44 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by sp88dc View Post
And also, what type of socks should I have on?
Long, thin, no wrinkles.
post #45 of 51
My advice: Don't wear too much on the bottom because it is difficult to shed a layer on the run. Silk as a base layer is great. Get insulated, water-proof pants and you should be fine. You exert a lot of energy skiiing and you can get warm really quickly.

Something I haven't seen mentioned is that you should make sure you have good gloves and a neck gator or something to cover your face. I see so many red-faced people on the slopes but I prefer to cover my face to keep it warm.

As a first timer, you should consider a helmet not only for protection but they are very warm.

And don't forget sun block just in case you don't cover your face!

(;-)-<-<//
post #46 of 51

Smartwool Socks

Quote:
Originally Posted by hitherandthither View Post
Long, thin, no wrinkles.
Maybe i missed the mention, but having worn boots for decades, and ski boots for about 4 years -- smartwool (thin ski sock variant) is the way to go, esp. if your feet sweat a lot (like mine).

I also like patagonia thin zip up synthetic top (same weight used for winter running base layer) and just thin fleece pants under the ski pants (and oddly enough they go into my boot, but are really thin).

As others stated, for the rest layers are key, w/zippers, no need to spend a lot. I used old winter gear (waterproof) the first year i skied, as i wanted, as others stated, to figure out what was right for me.

I carry a gaiter always. Final note, HELMET (i know a near-religious war issue here) but I wear it because of other skiers, not worries about hitting head on trees etc (and my wife insists). Have yet to hit trees, but been hit by three other folks on hills, and greens are the most dangerous slopes. my .02
post #47 of 51

Here's what I wear:

Socks medium weight smart wool.  Kept me warm in 5F (this was mid day high, it started off at 0F).

For the bottom:

MH power stretch tights  (not needed in warmer weather, like 30F and above)

MH Mistral fleece pants

MH Xenon Gore-Tex (waterproof breathable) pants (shell only)

 

For the Top:

MH Wicked T

MH power stretch Zip-T

MH Mynx fleece jacket

MH Adaro Gore-Tex Pro technical shell.

 

Marmot Gore-Tex XCR Randonee gloves

 

Face/Head:

GIRO Fuse HELMET*** (you can rent these)

Oakely A-frame goggles with 2 lenses.

MH windstopper half balaclava.

 

Ok, so I spend a lot on clothing.  For a first timer assuming it ain't snowing like crazy.  The key here is layer and avoid cotton like the plague.  For all layers if you can.  If you can't at least your baselayer (touching your skin) should be 100% polyester.  Merino blend socks are fine, but I still prefer polyester.  Btw polyester is a synthetic so what the poster posted above is BS. Everything I mentioned that's not a shell is made entirely out of polyester.  Towels are made from cotton for a very good reason:  They soak up moisture.  It will also make you cold once it's soaked.  Polyester on the other hand will wick the moisture away and eventually evaporate from your body heat in your outer layers.   If you ever take a freshly washed bath towel and throw it in with a fleece blanket in the dryer, the blanket will probably dry in a 3rd of the time.  Same principal applies with skiing. 

post #48 of 51

The best piece of advice on here so far is to take a couple of pairs of warm gloves or mittens.

 

My own preference is Gore-Tex with a sueded leather palm. 

 

I can guarantee that, as  a first-time skiier, between falling and sweating, you are going to find that your gloves are going to get wet and when they do, your hands will get cold.   It won't matter how toasty the rest of you is if your hands get cold. Switch to the dry pair when that happens. If that pair gets wet, either buy, borrow or steal a third pair, or call it a day.

 

 

post #49 of 51

My advice--keep it simple.

 

The greatest sin is to overdress and be too hot.  Because skiing involves a lot of physical activity, it is doubtful that you will be too cold.

 

On top, I wear a short sleeve shirt, a sweater, and a jacket.

On bottom, I wear sweat pants, and then ski pants.

On head, I wear balaclava (with neck warmer attached) and helmet/goggles

 

That's it.

 

Also, I would invest in a camelback hydration system--makes a BIG difference, and you don't have to buy expensive drinks at the lodge so it pays for itself.

 

And I second the suggestion for multiple gloves--they will get wet. 

post #50 of 51

First of all, you never told us whether you are male or female; if you allow me to use stereotypes, that will determine the ratio of style to function.  But overall the three most important clothing pieces for the first trip are: waterproof pants (I mean really waterproof, made with laminated or coated fabric), a good pair of waterproof gloves (splurge and get GoreTex gloves, it is not much more expensive than other kinds and works much better, really), and a helmet (rent it).  If your butt, or your head, or your hands are cold and wet you will be miserable regardless of everything else. A good waterproof jacket helps a lot, but it is a big investment and with layers underneath you will be fine in almost anything.  (BUT: If you are a female, and care about the way you look, a nice-looking jacket is a must;-)   If your boots are rentals, your feet will be kind of miserable anyway, so don't sweat about socks too much.   Good luck on your trip, 

 

Alex

post #51 of 51

Everyone is telling you what they wear now. I'll tell you what I wore my first year or two skiing, mostly in New Hampshire and Vermont. Cheap fleece pants from JobLot (a Rhode Island institution) -- 10 bucks. A pair of old LLBean running pants, not waterproof, just water repellent. You will likely not spend as much time on the snow as everyone is telling you, and unless it's really wet slush, the water resistant pants will be fine.

 

On top I wore a cheap (10 bucks) fleece top (JobLot again), don't remember what I wore underneath, but it wasn't Under Armor or anything fancy. Outside layer was an old very light winter jacket that had a collar that zipped up to cover my mouth. And a warm hat, and some good gloves/mittens. The gloves are key, if you have a thin pair of gloves, wear those under some mittens if it's cold. Hand and toe warmers, buy them and leave them in your pocket untill you need them. Neck gaitors are cheap and a good idea. I didn't have goggles my first couple of seasons, I wore my eyeglasses or sunglasses (remember, everyone, he's not going to be going that fast.)

 

My main advice is to bring extra clothes and leave them in the car, that way if you need to change you'll have dry stuff. But groomed snow in cold weather will not get you very wet if you fall. Sweat is more likely to get you wet.

 

Commit to three days even if you hate days 1 and 2. You'll be hooked by day 3. Have fun!

 

 

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