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1st timer - ski attire

post #1 of 51
Thread Starter 
Hi everyone,

So as you can see, this is my very first post on this forum, and plan on going skiing for the first time in a couple of weeks.

So to get started, am I very concerned (and getting really stressed out) about what to wear. How many layers of pants should I have on (I'll be going to South Central Ontario)? I'm thinking of base layer, some track/fleece pants and snow pants.

And for jackets, could a 3 in 1 jacket (such as those made by Misty Mountain or Columbia) be used for the Mid-layer, Fleece/Soft Shell and Outer layers?

Thanks!
post #2 of 51
Sounds like a good start. Everybody is different, so you'll have to learn as you go. That would be too much on the legs for me, but the 3 in 1 jacket over a breathable base layer should be good unless it's very cold. You'll be working hard - especially when you're first learning - so this generates a lot of heat.

Get some good wool or synthetic ski socks that aren't too heavy. Heavy socks just make you sweat a lot resulting in cold feet.

So don't stress out, have fun.
post #3 of 51
Being a novice you will want to be sure that your top pants layer is very water repellent because you will spend some time sitting in snow. A base layer (long johns), turtleneck, sweater/fleece, ski pants and a jacket with a hat or helmet gets you through most conditions comfortably. You'll be surprised how little attention you pay to the elements/weather once you start actually skiing. The overall skiing experience is so exhilarating and you will be moving around a lot so you won't get too cold unless you have an unusually long delay on the lift or it happens to rain. Be sure and bring goggles! You won't want to be without them if the area or mother nature is making snow.
Welcome to the greatest pastime/way of life ever.
post #4 of 51
Hey don't worry so much. A 3 in 1 jacket will do a very good job of keeping you warm. I would wear a an under armor shirt or similar article underneath and if its really cold maybe a fleece. As far as for your legs I have never worn anything more than a pair of long johns and lightly insulated ski pants. Your muscles work hard when you ski which produces a lot of heat and generally keeps them warm unless you are standing around for a long time.
post #5 of 51
Stay active---but never, ever, let yourself sweat. Unzip etc...
---
If you make a mistake, go warmer, not colder. Your chest and head, once warm will allow warm blood to travel to your toes and fingers. If your chest or head get cold, it shuts off supply.
--
Helmets are VERY warm. Invest in a 15 dollar balacava----real thin...fits great and keeps heat in under a helmet or hat
post #6 of 51
Down to about 10 degrees, I'll wear thin synthetic base layers top and bottom, Slalom waterproof/breathable snow pants I got for $40 on clearance, and a Columbia 3 in 1 jacket. I like a turtleneck top to keep my neck covered.
Below that temp, I'll wear a thicker fleece bottom layer and add another thin synthetic top below my turtleneck. Never use 3 layers on my legs, that would be way too much.
I switched to mittens after always having freezing fingers with gloves, and only rarely have to use hand warmers now to stay comfortable. Gotta have moisture wicking socks, don't be wearing your cotton gym stuff.
I prefer to wear a neoprene mask in most conditions, but I'm kind of weird that way. I'll add a balaclava with a thin top part to keep a comfortable helmet fit when it's really cold. The helmet always keeps my head warm, the balaclava keeps the thin line on my forehead between my goggles and helmet from driving me nuts in harsh conditions.

If I were starting over again, I'd probably go with a conventional ski jacket with a powder waist and a separate fleece, but the 3 in 1 is an economical way to go. The things that tend to make me cold are wind blowing up my sleeves and the bottom of my jacket, and the perimeter of my face when I don't have the balaclava on. I'm always taking my mittens off the help my daughter with things, so I rarely have a good seal around my wrists.

If you get cold, stop at a lodge and warm up. No shame in that!
post #7 of 51
Here in the states, beginner skiers are required to wear licensed NFL aparrel - this is for safety reasons as it allows other skiers on the hill to easily see and avoid the noobs.

Ontario has no such laws, but I'd still recommend a Leafs jersey, or maybe a snowmobile suit.

Once you've learned to turn and stop it will be safe to dress like the rest of us.
post #8 of 51
A good friend of mine skied for his first time last week. Wore a base layer and snow pants on bottom and base with wick shirt and jacket on top. He was too warm the entire time. Not sweating but warm. The problem was after his lesson we went up to a nice easy green run. One trip down and his hands were so cold he had to go in. His gloves had become wet from falling and picking himself up. He said next time he would have to bring a second pair of gloves to trade out if they became wet.
post #9 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by Walt View Post
Here in the states, beginner skiers are required to wear licensed NFL aparrel - this is for safety reasons as it allows other skiers on the hill to easily see and avoid the noobs.
.

New Sig

Edit: too long, damn't!!
post #10 of 51
Little things that make a huge difference:

Neck warmer, seems to trap jacket heat

goggles

moisture wicking (non cotton) base layer

not having anything inside your boot except for your foot and socks, do not let your log underwear go into the boot, it will make your shins hurt. I chop all of mine off at the knee, not sure why they make so many full length pairs

hand warmer packets if its uber cold


However you are a beginner and will be working really hard, so you will sweat more, so less will probably be more. Bring spare gloves and socks.

Welcome to Epic and the glorious sport of skiing. Do not let rental boots discourage you, when you have your own, they are way more comfy.

Good luck and have fun!!
post #11 of 51
Jeans and a Bruins jersey should do it. Bruins jerseys are warmer than Rangers jerseys.
post #12 of 51
I use 3-in-1 Columbia with proper shirts according to weather. I leave extra in my car, heavy sweat pants, x shirts... for the unexpected.

Just some advice, DON"T go out and buy expensive new state of the art stuff until you are more experienced. you will learn your style of skiing and conditions you play in. Each ski gear item (including clothing) serves a particular purpose and caters to a particular skier type. If you buy now, your treadmill wont be happy.

Basic snow pant, 3 in 1 coat (one on sale) will always serve well.

Don't forget the hand warmers, pay attention not to get your gloves wet, Take them off when needing to handle an item that could get them wet.

Cold hands = Going home, point blank!
post #13 of 51

What they said...

...and if you happen to already have something like this (or that you can buy in KMart for Not Very Much Money), this and some undies are about all you'll need to get started...and maybe forever!



http://www.carhartt.com/webapp/wcs/s...tegoryId=10908
post #14 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sinecure View Post
Jeans and a Bruins jersey should do it.
True, just make sure that you tuck the jeans into your boots.

A cowboy hat, or one of those Crocodile Dundee hats is a nice finishing touch.
post #15 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by Walt View Post
.....one of those Crocodile Dundee hats is a nice finishing touch.
...my sister in-law wears one of dem!!!!!!! (and she tucks her tights into her boots; been skiing that way for 20 years!) I gave her some alligator teeth one year to stick on her hat ban...she thinks it's very, very cool! Be careful though, she can outski many on this forum!
post #16 of 51
Just remember...NO COTTON. You don't want to sweat and then your clothes be wet. That truly sucks.

I wear wicking base layer then some light ski pants. I have a heavier pair if the temp is too cold. I usually just wear my light ski jacket over my wicking layer. I get hot very easily...so this is usually enough. I will many times put a fleece zip up in my backpack and put it on if the temp does drop or I get cold. Make sure your gloves are water proof. Actually...make sure everything is water proof that touches the snow. Getting cold is the worst thing that can happen while skiing.
post #17 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by Spaceace414 View Post
Getting cold is the worst thing that can happen while skiing.
Um.....no.

Ask Mary Bono, or that guy who had trouble on the lift at Vail three weeks ago.
post #18 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jag View Post
I use 3-in-1 Columbia with proper shirts according to weather. I leave extra in my car, heavy sweat pants, x shirts... for the unexpected.

Just some advice, DON"T go out and buy expensive new state of the art stuff until you are more experienced. you will learn your style of skiing and conditions you play in. Each ski gear item (including clothing) serves a particular purpose and caters to a particular skier type. If you buy now, your treadmill wont be happy.

Basic snow pant, 3 in 1 coat (one on sale) will always serve well.

Don't forget the hand warmers, pay attention not to get your gloves wet, Take them off when needing to handle an item that could get them wet.

Cold hands = Going home, point blank!
I used to ski in sweats and thought I was fine, but then bought synthetic base layers from Sierra Trading Post for $10-15 a pop and was amazed at the difference. The cotton sweats would get damp no matter what the conditions and make me feel swampy...a thin synthetic base layer keeps me warm and dry in most conditions. Baggy fleece pants (kind of like sweats) take care of me when I need more warmth.
I usually buy hand and toe warmers in quantity at LL Bean for $1 or less per pack. I've also done WalMart in an emergency, they were a strange brand but worked fine (but more $$$ than LL Bean). They're mostly for my daughter, but they're nice to have stuffed in a jacket pocket just in case.
I wasn't a cheapskate like this until my wife got me trained...
post #19 of 51
Must...

resist....

urge.....

to....

pick on noob gaper possible troll and suggest trying the same post on TGR....

ow, I think I hurt my brain.


Welcome to the wonderful world of skiing and EpicSki. Go out there and have some fun. If you survive , come back and let us know how you did so we can offer you more advice and pick on you some more.
post #20 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by eblackwelder View Post
Must...

resist....

urge.....

to....

pick on noob gaper possible troll and suggest trying the same post on TGR....
Ahhhh, the sheer entertainment value of total humility.

Even better when noob try to respond, only to fuel their own demise.
post #21 of 51
I agree with all the above. Another tip for you on a different note- you should spend a bit of time on youtube looking at the great tips for skiers at all levels.... my beginner friends find these videos excellent for getting their heads around a few basic concepts.

IMO, beginners don't move as much and therefore might get colder more quickly (less movement, less dynamic stance etc). I've only ever worn two layers on legs (thermals plus ski pants) except for last weekend when temps were brutal! I added an extra layer under my ski pants (and also used hand and toe warmers!)

I definitely recommend a neck warmer - seems essential even in average temps. Don't spend too much money on technical clothing until you know what you want.

Another tip (apologies if you already know this).. note that your ski pants have an elastic inner liner which is designed to be stretched over the outside of your boots. Some beginners think this inner liner is supposed to be tucked into your boots. I cringe when I see some people have shoved the liner of their pants down into their boots (the elastic inner layer of your ski pants is to prevent snow getting down your boot)... as mentioned above, don't wear anything in your boot other than your sock!
post #22 of 51
just a tip about the hand warmers....I see so many new skiiers putting them in their gloves in their palms. this does nothing for your fingers.

if you put them in your gloves on the BACKS of your hands, where all your blood and veins flow right near the surface, it keeps the fingers much much warmer!

I carry a roll of medical tape and was taping them with one strip, but then I found that just putting them inside the glove, at the top of the hand near the wrist, when i grasp my poles the warmers stay in place perfectly.

i also have a thumb hole in my base layer (cw-x) so sometimes I tuck the warmers in the sleeve there.

this weekend, it was -24 degrees at Suicide Six on friday, i used TWO hand warmers per glove....
post #23 of 51
Thread Starter 
Wow, I am extremely impressed with the replies so far. So far alot more then what I have expected! Thank you very much. So I've included some photos of what I'd plan to have on as layers 2, 3 and 4. Yes, I do not have a 3 in 1 jacket as of yet!!!!!

And I plan on going to Blue Mountain for my first skiing experience. I'd expect it to be around -5 to -12/15 celcuis (23-5C) when I go there.

Oh, is it possible to post pictures on the forum?
post #24 of 51
Lissen real hard.

Nothing goes into your boot but your foot with a sock on it.

Nothing goes into your boot but your foot with a sock on it.

what that means ...

No pants get stuffed in there, don't wear two pair of socks ... just one decent ski sock .... and your freakin foot. All that other stuff will just cause hot spots, pressure and pain.

Am I clear?

I know that when you get the lift ticket and look at that electrical tie or wire wickett, the first place you will want to put it is on the zipper pull of your jacket.

Dont do that!

If you put that ticket on the zipper of your jacket, guess where it will wind up when you actually start skiing?

It will end up in your eyes .... now you can't see and you feel pretty stupid ..... and you can't take it off without going all the way back to some office and dealing with a bureaucrat.

Watcha' need to do is watch the weather. Keep this in mind for future trips too. If it's going to be cold all day, your jacket pocket zip isn't real bad ..... but if it's going to warm up .... find a spot on your pants (there is usually a ring), and that way you can strip out of the jacket.
post #25 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by eblackwelder View Post
Must...

resist....

urge.....

to....

pick on noob gaper possible troll and suggest trying the same post on TGR....
Noob: Yes
Troll: maybe
Hillarity would ensue if posted on TGR: Certainly

However, I would not call this person a gaper yet. They may be asking questions that are dumb to us, but they are asking the question, not just assuming that jeans are ski gear that is meant to be tucked into boots. I give this person credit (unless they are a troll) for trying to not be a gaper.

Hint to future non-gaper, don't ask what a gaper or Jong is, use the search function instead.
post #26 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by sp88dc View Post
-5 to -12/15 celcuis (23-5C)
Translator please
post #27 of 51
Ok, my previous posts on this thread were jokes. Don't take them seriously.

Here's some real advice: don't wait until you get to Blue to take your first runs. Blue is a real hill (by flyover country standards anyway), and a bunny hill is a bunny hill, whether it's in Colorado or Toronto. There's likely a small "feeder" hill near where you live - go there and get the basic chops down so that when you get to Blue you can enjoy skiing it top to bottom instead of being stuck on the bunny hill.

Skyloft, Chicopee, Glen Eden et.al. will provide more than enough challenge for a never ever. Take a lesson or two at one of those places first before going all the way to the destination resort and you'll enjoy yourself much more.

Check out this map of Ontario ski resorts - there's likely one near you.
post #28 of 51
sp88dc,
Sounds like a plan. Just don't wear a Starter brand jacket.
post #29 of 51
I wear a hood made by Turtle Fur; it's great for skiing, and I also wear it digging cars out of snow, cutting wood, patching roofs, etc, in the coldest weather. It's a good investment if you do any of those things in winter, and never ski again. In fact, I bought mine in a store that sells guns and ammo.

You'll be skiing slowly to start, make sure that you can unzip the layers you wear, for ventilation.
In other words, don't wear a big fluffy pull over sweater.
Learning to turn at slow speeds, it's fine to have your jacket open; I do it now when practicing certain moves, on bumps and in the park; then when I get back on the chair, or speed up, I zip up.
Your plans for your pants match what I still wear to this day. Base layer, fleece running pants, ski pants or bib. I'm fine wearing that in temps ranging from below zero up to the 30s.
post #30 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by Walt View Post
True, just make sure that you tuck the jeans into your boots.

A cowboy hat, or one of those Crocodile Dundee hats is a nice finishing touch.
Quote:
Originally Posted by ragin' cajun View Post
Quote:
Originally Posted by Walt
.....one of those Crocodile Dundee hats is a nice finishing touch.

...my sister in-law wears one of dem!!!!!!! (and she tucks her tights into her boots; been skiing that way for 20 years!) I gave her some alligator teeth one year to stick on her hat ban...she thinks it's very, very cool! Be careful though, she can outski many on this forum!

Cowboy Hat? Who's wearing cowboy hats?


But I'm sure many can and will outski me (not that I really care, I'll look at them better skiers as examples to follow)
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