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wax or sharpen first?

post #1 of 18
Thread Starter 
when tuning race skis, what do you do first? For whatever reason, I sharpen first, then wax. I end up taking a scotch brite pad to the edges to take the wax off the edges and sidewall, but I figure that is better than gunking up my files/stones with wax.
post #2 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by dmoney24 View Post
when tuning race skis, what do you do first? For whatever reason, I sharpen first, then wax. I end up taking a scotch brite pad to the edges to take the wax off the edges and sidewall, but I figure that is better than gunking up my files/stones with wax.
Sharpen first. You should not use a scotch brite pad on your edges. Use a plastic scraper with a notch in it designed for this purpose. Scothbright or Fibertex on the sidewalls is fine as long as you stay away for your edges.
post #3 of 18
Second that--sharpen first, then wax, and use a plastic scraper, not an abrasive pad, on the edges.

If you can't find one already notched, file a square notch into the corner of a plastic scraper, for a quick, easy, and very effective edge scraper.

Best regards,
Bob
post #4 of 18
You can use almost anything to scrape the wax off the sides of your edges, as long as it's soft enough to not affect the edge work. The notch on the scraper works, and so does the short "end" of the scraper for the actual edge clean up. A lot of guys use soft plastic "scrubbies" {kitchen sink variety} to clean wax off sdewalls, bindings, etc. Does not damage to the ski at all, and cleans up quickly. That's waht we use. A cheap paper painter's tape applied to the sidewalls when waxing can also make things easier in the clean up, depending on how much you drip. Of course you could also use a wax company's paper tape, at about 3X the cost.
post #5 of 18
I dont know how much of a true 'race' ski we are actually talking about, but at some performance level wouldn't it make sense to wax first and then scrape just to prevent the metal particles from getting too deep into the base during sharpening and make any cleaning-specific wax jobs go easier?

dont the most hardcore tuning manuals say to put base prep wax on right after racing for one reason or another?
post #6 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by 740weapon View Post
I dont know how much of a true 'race' ski we are actually talking about, but at some performance level wouldn't it make sense to wax first and then scrape just to prevent the metal particles from getting too deep into the base during sharpening and make any cleaning-specific wax jobs go easier?

dont the most hardcore tuning manuals say to put base prep wax on right after racing for one reason or another?
NO tune first, then wax and then scrape. YOu cannot get accurate base bevel or side edge bevel angles with wax on your ski. And you may need to hot scrape and do some structure reduction which you do after tuning.

I always use base tape when working on my side edges to protect my bases.
post #7 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by Atomicman View Post
And you may need to hot scrape and do some structure reduction which you do after tuning.
What's the advantage of reducing structure after edge tuning?
post #8 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by Alpinord View Post
What's the advantage of reducing structure after edge tuning?
do you want to run tools constantly up and back over your freshly cleaned and prepared bases? You want to do all base cleaning, rotobrusing, hot scraping and waxing, after edges. ensures all debris & dirt from filing are all cleaned off base before waxing.

this also goes for fibertexing any microhairs caused by rotobrushing. You definetly want to do this before edge work.

Additionally since you have now beveled your base edge it is lower then the base and out of way when working on the bases.

But mostly, I don't want to have file guides and shavings and so forth on my freshly cleaned, and prepared bases.
post #9 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by Atomicman View Post
do you want to run tools constantly up and back over your freshly cleaned and prepared bases? You want to do all base cleaning, rotobrusing, hot scraping and waxing, after edges. ensures all debris & dirt from filing are all cleaned off base before waxing.

this also goes for fibertexing any microhairs caused by rotobrushing. You definetly want to do this before edge work.

Additionally since you have now beveled your base edge it is lower then the base and out of way when working on the bases.

But mostly, I don't want to have file guides and shavings and so forth on my freshly cleaned, and prepared bases.
Guess I figured that is what the base tape is supposed to protect.
post #10 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by Alpinord View Post
Guess I figured that is what the base tape is supposed to protect.
You don't want to put base tape over a freshly prepared base. You base tape first, tune edges and then start your base prep. Base tape protects the unprepared base from filings and so forth, but do you really want to do all that work on your bases and then tape them and then hammer the tape into your freshly prepared base.

I thnk not!
post #11 of 18
terry, just for grins!

Why would you want to do your base work first and then your edges?
post #12 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by Atomicman View Post
You don't want to put base tape over a freshly prepared base. You base tape first, tune edges and then start your base prep. Base tape protects the unprepared base from filings and so forth, but do you really want to do all that work on your bases and then tape them and then hammer the tape into your freshly prepared base.

I thnk not!
This wouldn't be as much a problem if you waxed first...

(I couldn't resist. )
post #13 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by Alpinord View Post
This wouldn't be as much a problem if you waxed first...

(I couldn't resist. )
That absolutley makes no sense

You are going to prep, clean, wax and scrape and polish and then start having metal shavings fly.

No, no no no no no, not on my skis!
post #14 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by Atomicman View Post
terry, just for grins!

Why would you want to do your base work first and then your edges?
I go back on forth on this one. If you have base repairs and related flattening and restructuring areas, it seems like the right progression. If it's a maintenance tune with no base issues, a little touch up after tuning may be necessary. Sometimes it doesn't seem to matter one way or the other. Flip a coin.
post #15 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by Atomicman View Post
That absolutley makes no sense

You are going to prep, clean, wax and scrape and polish and then start having metal shavings fly.

No, no no no no no, not on my skis!
I was yanking your crank A-man.
post #16 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by Alpinord View Post
I was yanking your crank A-man.
I know, it felt great
post #17 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by dmoney24 View Post
when tuning race skis, what do you do first? For whatever reason, I sharpen first, then wax. I end up taking a scotch brite pad to the edges to take the wax off the edges and sidewall, but I figure that is better than gunking up my files/stones with wax.
Here is a simplified tuning guide.
post #18 of 18
Thread Starter 

I have always sharpened the edges first, then wax, scrape and brush the bases.  I must admit, after scraping the wax off the edges with the short-side of the plastic scraper, and brushing the bases, I run the diamond files (red, then green) on the edges.  Then a quick brush with the nylon brush and I'm done.

 

I just feel that there should be no wax on the edge, to ensure they are sharp and polished.  I don't know how you can do that by only using the notch on the scraper or the short-side of the scraper.

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