New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Mis-aligned Bindings

post #1 of 15
Thread Starter 
Hi, new to the forums so wasn't sure where to post this!

I bought some Line Anthems (161cm) the other day along with some rossi bindings which the shop offered to mount for me. Despite the skis being symmetrical I have the bindings mounted 2cm back from the midline to increase the skis versitility.

When I picked them up I noticed that the bindings were mounted 1 or 2mm to the left on both skis. I tried skiing on them and did notice it was much easier to turn to the left than the right (although this is also my stronger turning side and it could have been psychological too!) When I queried this with the shop they said it shouldn't make a difference to my skiing.

Just wondered for peoples opinions on whether this would effect my skiing and/or what I should do.
Thank you!
post #2 of 15
I would forget about it.
post #3 of 15
I would say that you probably won't notice in general but...the shops attitude is ridiculous, I can't believe they took that approach. My guess is that their tech was rushing and didn't check the feet on the jig. I'd tell them you want a new pair. To me, the question isn't really whether or not you'd notice but the quality of work done by a shop, they need to stand behind it
post #4 of 15
What way did you measure the 1-2mm difference?
Just wondering, casue 1/25th of an inch isn't much, and if the measurement was against the graphics, I'd suspect the graphics rather than the mount.
post #5 of 15
Make sure you measure from the steel edges, not the topsheet or graphics.
post #6 of 15
I'm at the other end of the spectrum....

1-2mm for a ski that narrow is huge. (a big ass pow ski, not so much)

But, here's the thing: If you spend a day/week/month skiing them dedicated to specific feet, then you'll notice a huge difference when you switch them.

I would take them back to the shop and be strict (yet polite) about a new set up.

A jig is not difficult to operate. This level of error is actually not acceptable.
post #7 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by samurai View Post

But, here's the thing: If you spend a day/week/month skiing them dedicated to specific feet, then you'll notice a huge difference when you switch them.

Um, no.
post #8 of 15
Okay, maybe you wouldn't. I've had misalligned bindings. I noticed it. Did it prevent me from skiing? No. Would I tolerate the error again? No. Not if a jig were used.

My Mavens were too wide for my shop's jig, so I trusted the race tech to hand mount them. (I'm good with a drill, but he gave me his guarantee.) They were still spot on. I would have accepted a few millimeters of error in that situation though.
post #9 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by samurai View Post
Okay, maybe you wouldn't. I've had misalligned bindings. I noticed it. Did it prevent me from skiing? No. Would I tolerate the error again? No. Not if a jig were used.

My Mavens were too wide for my shop's jig, so I trusted the race tech to hand mount them. (I'm good with a drill, but he gave me his guarantee.) They were still spot on. I would have accepted a few millimeters of error in that situation though.
Both the skis are mounted off the same amount in the same direction, they would be the same either way around.
post #10 of 15
I guess my reaction would be proportional to how much they really are off by vs how wide the ski is. Is it the toes, heels, or both? The ski is fat IMO, I'd call a 90+ waist fat. And, it's a twin, not exactly a carving ski or SL/GS. So being off by 1.5 mm probably wouldn't bother me nearly as much as it would on a 70s waist hardpack ski. I'd probably notice some difference turning left vs right if the bindings were closer to the left edges than the right edges by 2mm. How good of a deal did you get on them anyway? It looks like the mount was free.
post #11 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by karpiel View Post
Both the skis are mounted off the same amount in the same direction, they would be the same either way around.
Oh. Good point.



In that case... whatever... as long as they don't have your feet pointed off to the side. (I had that once too, it sucked.)
post #12 of 15
Thread Starter 
thanks for all your views and comments.

been trying to find a way to measure the space between the edge and the binding more accurately! i measured the difference using two bits of card (one from binding and one up from edge). Both the toe and heel pieces are definately mounted 2mm to the left of the lateral centre on both skis (not pointed off to the side thankfully!) Waist measurement is 93mm.

i got a pretty good deal on the skis and the mount was free because its an intrawest shop and i'm intrawest staff. i've still only skiied 3 days on them since i bought them almost 2 weeks ago, have been using my carve skis mostly. Hopefully when the snow arrives i'll be using these skis mainly for powder and park, so perhaps off groomers i won't feel as much of a difference?

Only reason I'm hesistant to return them is because they were the last pair in my size they had... I'll ski a couple more days on them and see if they feel any better.
post #13 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by samurai View Post
They were still spot on. I would have accepted a few millimeters of error in that situation though.
Freehand mounts are often more accurate than jig mounts, because they are done with care and without implicit trust in a fallible tool.

There are a lot of ways a jig can go wrong that are difficult to notice until you've already done the damage. One way the OPs issue can happen is if the jig wasn't installed coplanar to the ski, or in other words, the drill wasn't drilling perpendicular to the topsheet.
post #14 of 15
sometimes jigs can become off center due to age, being dropped, and or the rubber feet slipping below the ski.
post #15 of 15
The should be all right as long as you keep them on edge. You might have an easier time catching an edge (the one closer to the bindings) when you try and ski straight though. I wouldn't worry too much about a mm or two.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Tuning, Maintenance and Repairs