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Instructor skiing and SL/GS MA... What to change... - Page 2

post #31 of 51
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by KAZOOSKI View Post
Changing your "habit" will be the challenge. In a clinic with Jeb Boydd (PSIA D Team) last spring, he kept saying "You paid for 2 whole skis, why not use the front half too? If you stop at 2:39-2:40 of your vid you get an image of using the back 1/3.

I think skiing taller will help avoid those momments of "OH SH.."
Haha I knew someone would reference that point... I have it in HD here on my laptop I wish I could show it but its too large a file... It was actually a pretty good recovery to not eat it.

It was a breakover and a tight gate (very few made it) and I didn't make a move forward (pole plant and such)

I also think my changes in gear are helping me quite a bit with standing on the right spot on my ski.
post #32 of 51
TMAS,
I've watched your vid again. Not to beat the horse dead, but in the spirit of helping (and to improve my eye for MA).
At 1:41, 1:42, and 1:43 you can see your ski tips come up as you start the next turn, especialy as you move over to start the second series of brushes. Often youir femur is parallel with your skis. I've been taught that our femur should be pointing at the toe piece of the binding. In the series starting at 3:11 You are nice and tall at the transition but settle back as the turn develops. Compare your position at 3:31 to that at 3:33. Extend the line defined by your femur and see where it points. Another way to think of this ,courtesy of Jeb Boyd, was "is your body keeping up with your feet, or has it fallen behind?"

Also, to help with the wild hands, spend some time skiing with your poles horizontal across the back of your wrists. This should help with both the hands and the tipping of your shoulders. Keep at it until you can do the drills in your video with poles on your wrists.

Have fun,
post #33 of 51
kazooski,

Quote:
Changing your "habit" will be the challenge. In a clinic with Jeb Boydd (PSIA D Team) last spring, he kept saying "You paid for 2 whole skis, why not use the front half too? If you stop at 2:39-2:40 of your vid you get an image of using the back 1/3.

I think skiing taller will help avoid those momments of "OH SH.."
Im glad you see it too. A little surprised on one else spotted it before me.

TMAS, You need to work on flexing the ankles instead of your knees and bending at the waist. From there, you can get in a stacked position in the iniation and get your skis doing in the first half of the turn what you are trying to do in the last half.



RW
post #34 of 51
Thread Starter 
I have been playing around with the way I move my center of mass... I have no video yet but I think its bringing me more forward too...

I had issues with the proverbial backseat for quite a while but also understand that this is taken after a few month's halt off snow... Using my whole ski was not an issue for me when I was actively competing. (not trying to cover my butt, just saying
post #35 of 51
TMAS,

CSIA vs PSIA?

If your bumps suck, you won't make CSIA 3. If your bumps REALLY suck, Level 2 is out -- for 2 you need to be comfortable on them. For 3, you need to be exemplary.

What about PSIA, when do bumps matter?
post #36 of 51
Quote:
What about PSIA, when do bumps matter?
Same as CSIA.

RW
post #37 of 51
TMAS29, are you going for CSIA L2? PSIA is substantially different. I actually suspect you would have an easier time with PSIA than CSIA because of your race background. You will see what I mean when you go through the cert clinic. They don't like to see an articulated ankle in CSIA last time I checked. There is a decade old conflict between CSIA and CSCF on this matter.

You obviously ski at a high level. Being a ski instructor does not necessarily mean skiing at a high level. You will have to learn specific skills related to speed control. How to perform slower, controlled, yet round turns. Its a different set of skills than what you're using in this video. For L2 you're going to need to do some bumps, but don't worry you don't have to rip them, not even close. But you do have to be able to ski through them slowly in control, easy bumps.

FYI, in a lot of your video clips you're skiing on your heels, particularly free skiing. I notice in your gate work you aren't. But in the earlier free skiing clips, badly on your heels. You'll need to work on that too.

In CSIA they care A LOT about how you look, including silly things like how you are holding your arms and ski poles while you ski around. CSIA likes a rounded back, yours is straight(which is part of why you're on your heels).

I say just go to the clinics and get some feedback straight from the source and start working on whatever they tell you to work on. Depending on where you're located you might be able to get into some ski school prep clinics prior to going to the official week long cert clinic/exam.

Good luck
post #38 of 51
Thread Starter 
Just to clarify again, I'm doing this so I can proceed to my Level III coaches course.

getting further certs in instructor is however not out of the question...

Big E I was exagerating my inconpetence in the bumps a little :P
post #39 of 51
Your video shows good versatility over a range of drill courses & free skiing, SL & GS environments. For CSIA 2 your goal will be to further extend that versatility to low-end skiing & teaching demonstrations. CSIA course conductors will probably want to pull you forward to a more centred stance.

Range of motion through hips, knees & ankles is very good. You'll be asked to change the movements on the CSIA course(less performance, more distinct visual demonstration), but your ability to move in general will be a big bonus.

Your pole plants are pretty consistent. You'll have to adapt the form, but that should be achievable because you have the functional mechanics well established.

If you're CSCF DL certified, you should have at least a couple of seasons of active coaching experience, which will help somewhat on the teaching part of the CSIA course. A few drills you might have used coaching (e.g. braquage, holding/dragging poles) would be suitable for a CSIA course with some adaptations, and an emphasis on skill development rather than performance improvement.

For working towards CSCF PL, you want to use the front of your ski a lot more. Include the Coach Update &/or Advanced Tech Update in your training plans.
post #40 of 51
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by mogulmuncher View Post
Your video shows good versatility over a range of drill courses & free skiing, SL & GS environments. For CSIA 2 your goal will be to further extend that versatility to low-end skiing & teaching demonstrations. CSIA course conductors will probably want to pull you forward to a more centred stance.

Range of motion through hips, knees & ankles is very good. You'll be asked to change the movements on the CSIA course(less performance, more distinct visual demonstration), but your ability to move in general will be a big bonus.

Your pole plants are pretty consistent. You'll have to adapt the form, but that should be achievable because you have the functional mechanics well established.

If you're CSCF DL certified, you should have at least a couple of seasons of active coaching experience, which will help somewhat on the teaching part of the CSIA course. A few drills you might have used coaching (e.g. braquage, holding/dragging poles) would be suitable for a CSIA course with some adaptations, and an emphasis on skill development rather than performance improvement.

For working towards CSCF PL, you want to use the front of your ski a lot more. Include the Coach Update &/or Advanced Tech Update in your training plans.
Will do! thanks!
post #41 of 51
Thread Starter 

PSA that I passed my CSCF PL and well on my way to pass my CSIA L2

 

thanks for all the advice, I benefited from it a lot

post #42 of 51

Congrats TMAS29. You are saying that you benefitted from feedback here. Can you tell us a bit of what feedback in particular.

post #43 of 51

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by TMAS29 View Post

PSA that I passed my CSCF PL and well on my way to pass my CSIA L2

 

thanks for all the advice, I benefited from it a lot


Congratulations!
 

A little patience now will help adapt to a slightly different pace for the CSIA 2 course.  Skiing at the PL standard shows that you should clearly have the ability to meet the CSIA 2 standard, so give your CSIA examiners what they ask for and you should be fine.  The CSIA course will also add some good skills to your repertoire.  All the best as your journey continues.

post #44 of 51
Thread Starter 

the comments on the teaching aspects made me focus on that aspect and analyse myself when I was coaching my athletes.

 

The technical aspects were somewhat relevent too but my skiing changed a lot since the video was shot some fundamentals were right on though

post #45 of 51

TMAS29, you say early on in the thread that wedging had a great influence on you. Could you explain what you ment? Or maybe start a new thread where that aspect of high end skiing can be explained and discussed.

post #46 of 51
Thread Starter 

wedge turns allows you to position your body in a very strong position and build muscle memory..

 

We can start a thread about it

post #47 of 51

 

Hi TMAS29,

 

I took my CSIA 2 this season and having watched your video I don't think you will have a problem with the skiing side of the exam. Having said that, you won't be expected to ski like that for your exam.

What they are looking for is intermediate parallel on a blue slope. The main things they look for in this are both skis moving through the turn simultaneously i.e. a parallel turn, good athletic stance, balance over the downhill ski and a good even rhythm through the turns. They also do no expect to see much performance from the ski, so the level of edging you demonstrate in your video is not needed. In fact for my course they wanted the ski to be flat through the majority of the turn resulting in a 'skidded arc' where the tails of the skis follow the same path as the tips. You will also have to show strong pivoting, i.e. the legs turning before the body.You will be asked to show short radius turns but this is not a pass/fail aspect of the course. You may also be asked to ski through some bumps but all they are looking for here is an ability to maintain good stance and balance. You won't have to ski the fall line by any means.

The teaching part of the exam is fairly demanding. You will teach either a fast track to parallel or an intermediate parallel lesson (during the course you teach several of each). You have to start with a clear explanations of the skills involved, then you demo, then you watch the others on the course ski and have to assess and develop them. You will be expected to give 2 or 3 points of improvement per person and then pick one development exercise which will benefit them all. You do lots of work on this throughout the course though and as you are already a race coach I'm sure it's not a new skill for you.

I hope this helps!

post #48 of 51

I'm a race coach and know not about PSIA standards or what it takes to be an instructor. That said the skiing in the video is pretty solid. I noticed alot of people were commenting on the motion and what ever else. In the event that you want some more "dumbed down" feedback, I think you need to be more commited in separtating your upper and lower body motion during your transitions. Overall your turns seem to have a weaker finish that mid point and I'm guessing on ice that you tend to wash out your turns on fallaways and what not. Focus on really letting your body fall over your skis in the transitions and keeping your upper body really moving down the hill while your skiis fly out to the side and create the angles. In the video it seems like you like to create more angle mid turn by sinking into it a bit when really in my opinion at that phase of the turn you should be more stabalizing that building the angle.

post #49 of 51
Thread Starter 

The footage is obselete now, my skiing is much more refined now.

 

I'm much more over my ski.

post #50 of 51

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by ThePenguin View Post

Focus on really letting your body fall over your skis in the transitions and keeping your upper body really moving down the hill while your skiis fly out to the side and create the angles. In the video it seems like you like to create more angle mid turn by sinking into it a bit when really in my opinion at that phase of the turn you should be more stabalizing that building the angle.

I would like to ask some "dummed up"  questions regarding the highlighted text fragments above.

 

Fall over your skis

Im not familiar with this expression. Can you explain what it means. From where are you falling? From up hill? Does it include flexion of outside leg? Is this your way of triggering a retraction turn? Later on you explain that the skis are crossing out from underneath your body so I figure you are flexed through the transition.

 

Sinking into it

Are you saying that letting the skis fly away from under your body after transition is enough for setting up proper and sufficient edge angles through out the turn and that sinking into it as an additional movement late in the turn is un-nesessary? Is your experssion "sinking into it" a flexing movement of the legs in direction skis like pumping or is it dropping the CoM vertically? Or is this a higher end move after setting up proper edge angles? Kind of like the next step? Or should the sinking in happen earlier in the turn? The stabilizing comment suggests no sinking in in the low c part of the turn. But is sinking and dropping CoM the same thing?

post #51 of 51

Well honestly I'm not the world's best ski coach. I raced in college and coach on the weekends. Take this for what it is worth. A "more professional" coach might scoff at this!

 

But.... "Falling over your skiis" is an expression that I use for the feeling that is created as your skiis are tracking across the hill in the transition of the turn and your body continues directly down the hill creating effective "separation of upper and lower body." This is not a very techincal expression, it kind of feels like someone is yanking a carpet out from under your feet as your skiis fly out to the side and you drive your upper body/hips down the hill.

 

"Sinking in," I think it is kind of unessary and I believe that for me once my "skis fly out" that I pretty much just tip my ankles in a bit to engadge the shovel of the ski in the top part of the turn and stabalize my upper body by sinking out almost or reaching out with my then uphill pole. Building the body bend is important but I think it happens naturally.

 

Also in the bottom "C" part of the turn so to speak you should be "falling over your skiis" again with your upper body/core/hips to apply pressure to your skiis. Thus not sinking in. The sinking into the turn with your body should happen only in the top part of the c.

 

In my opinion, most skiiers have trouble creating a dynamic finish to the turn because they go about pressuring the skiis by essentially leaning against the force created by gravity in the "bottom part of the C." In this portion of the turn you have to let it all go and pressure down the hill.

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