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Snowflex

post #1 of 20
Thread Starter 
Has anyone here ever skied on snowflex. This stuff looks like it would be similar to real snow. There is currently no snowflex resorts in the U.S but there are a lot in the U.K and france.



If you dont know what snowflex is this video should clear everything up.

post #2 of 20
The answer for skiing in Georgia.

I like the mogul course and quarter pipe. We used to ski on bristles and artificial flakes in Ohio for instructor practice back in the early 70s, so not a new concept. I doubt it catches on, but wet fuzzy snow looks like fun if its all you have.
post #3 of 20
and when it comes to off-piste???
post #4 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by midwestskier9 View Post
This stuff looks like it would be similar to real snow.
LOL, not to me, not even close, lol. More Utah powder please ( to cover that snowflex sh_t up).
post #5 of 20
The kids hair at 0:50, priceless....

Also, the snow must be slippy, but grippy.
post #6 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by MSUBozangelas View Post
The kids hair at 0:50, priceless....

Also, the snow must be slippy, but grippy.
A prominent authority told me that the kid's hair is responsible for most of the crop circles in England.

The 'grippy' feel probably comes from static electricity.
post #7 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by MSUBozangelas View Post
The kids hair at 0:50, priceless....

Also, the snow must be slippy, but grippy.
The PTex bases, rubbing against the plastic Snowflex, create static electricity, hence the hair.

This stuff looks like Astroturf from Alaska.
post #8 of 20
It is similar to astroturf. Nasty when you fall on it. If you go too fast, it recks your skis - too much heat from the friction.
post #9 of 20
a friend of mine went last weekend and loved it. he fell down though and really ripped up his elbows (and he was wearing long sleeves)! so be careful, a face first landing could do some serious damage. my question is..what does it smell like?

anyway I hope to go soon, and i've heard great things about it :)
post #10 of 20
It's probably fun.

But it miss the one thing that makes skiing so charming and Magic.

It came to my mind that this stuff would be a solution to a world without snow..

wohh, that would be depressing.
post #11 of 20
Quote from Snowflex.com:
07 September 2009
Grand opening ceremony kicks off pro performance at the
Liberty Mountain Snowflex® Centre in Lynchburg, Virginia, USA

http://domain2149242.sites.fasthosts.com/absolutenm/anmviewer.asp?a=57&z=2
post #12 of 20
Snowflex is maybe the best of the dry slope technologies but that isn't really saying much, dry slopes are horrible and destroy skis, it is nothing like snow, grippy ice is about as close as you get to the feeling. Dry slopes can't hold an edge the way snow can (especially not if they're snowflex) but until recently it's all we have to train our racers on and despite the limitations the dry slope racing scene is pretty serious over here.

Here in the UK there are now a number of snow domes that are giant fridges with artificial snow which are much better, the hemel dry slope has just been replaced with a snowdome. You are still skiing on a 160-180m long 10 degree slope though and it's filled with brits who's skiing ability is rather questionable. Behold the gnar:



You can imagine how bad this gets at weekends near the ski season! Their main business is selling very pricey lessons before people go on holiday, but I take my SL skis there very occasionally just to remember the feeling of skiing
Edited by narc - 9/10/09 at 10:35am
post #13 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by anilson View Post

Quote from Snowflex.com:
07 September 2009
Grand opening ceremony kicks off pro performance at the
Liberty Mountain Snowflex® Centre in Lynchburg, Virginia, USA

http://domain2149242.sites.fasthosts.com/absolutenm/anmviewer.asp?a=57&z=2
 

 

I know this was an old post, but has anyone tried this at Liberty yet?  It opened last Fall and is about 2.5 hours from my house.  I'm a new skier (started last year), and I'm thinking it might be worthwhile to at least get some more ski time over the Summer or Fall.  We've watched some of the videos on youtube, and the kids and I got fairly excited about it.  We may try it out in the next month or so.  

post #14 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mikeheel View Post



 

I know this was an old post, but has anyone tried this at Liberty yet?  It opened last Fall and is about 2.5 hours from my house.  I'm a new skier (started last year), and I'm thinking it might be worthwhile to at least get some more ski time over the Summer or Fall.  We've watched some of the videos on youtube, and the kids and I got fairly excited about it.  We may try it out in the next month or so.  

 

Disclaimer: I have never been but I have read the info on their site.


Well for you there is only one slope since they won't even let you in the terrain park without undergoing a check on your abilities and it is a very small slope at that. Also, they make you wear long sleeves, long pants, and I think gloves too, and as hot as it has been lately that is a deal-breaker for me. I could see going in the late fall although the only thing that seems attractive to me is the terrain park.

post #15 of 20

Though an old thread, Woodward at Copper uses snowflex technology for their in runs. Stuff does get slippery when they spray it down. Like skiing on a brush, you do not want to fall or major friction burns.

post #16 of 20

Interesting, thanks. 

 

Fwiw, they only do night skiing right now; 6pm - midnight.  I'm thinking that is mostly due to the heat.  I understand it won't be snow; just looking for something nearby to keep a little edge through the year.  

post #17 of 20

Mikeheel, have you tried inline skating yet?

 

Most if not all mid-to-upper level skates will allow you to compensate for that right foot.

post #18 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by comprex View Post

Mikeheel, have you tried inline skating yet?

 

Most if not all mid-to-upper level skates will allow you to compensate for that right foot.


Hmmm. Thanks.  Was looking at some Friday evening, but didn't buy.  Maybe I'll go back.

post #19 of 20

Over here in England we've tried and tested virtually every type of artificial ski surface. Snowflex - which was developed by an engineering company in Yorkshire - is one of several 'continuous' (i.e. carpet-type) surfaces for skiing. The Japanese have made similar ski surfaces.

 

The general problem with carpet-type ski slopes is the responsiveness to ski edges and the degree to which carving is compromised. Plenty of water spray lubrication is ideal to minimise friction and ski heating. More popular, for these and other reasons (including durability), was a surface called Dendix which has a grid type structure and longer bristles for the ski to edge into.

 

But Dendix, which has a stainless steel grid into which the plastic bristles are crimped, has a drawback: equipment and limbs can be trapped in the cells, causing injuries. Thumbs are vulnerable.

 

There's unlikely ever to be an artificial ski surface which comes close to snow - hence the big investment in indoor snow facilities in Europe in recent years ... but it's nice to be in the open air and sunshine, rather than under a roof!

post #20 of 20

Hey Midwest, there is now a Snowflex facility in the US. It's located at the campus of Liberty University on Liberty Mountain in Lynchburg, Virginia. It's been successful and has been expanded since its opening in late 2009. It also operates with no problem during real snow conditions. It is hydrated with a misting system to keep it slick. If you wipe out, there's a thick padding underneath to cushion the blow, so you can get up and keep going.

 

Here's a US Snowflex video link to YouTube:

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kPJJZA5B1P0

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