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maintaining 0.5/3 bevel

post #1 of 21
Thread Starter 
Just picked my AC30s up from the shop after having them set the bevels. What's the easiest way to keep the side edges sharp at 3*?

I was thinking of picking up a multi-angle edge-guide and a diamond stone, but have no idea which tool I should be looking at and which brand/grit of diamonds to get. I'm on a budget, so something economical would be nice.
post #2 of 21
I much prefer the fixed angle guide. Nothing to mis-adjust.
post #3 of 21
I agree with Ghost regarding fixed-angle guides. I use Sun Valley Ski Tool guides for both the base and side edge bevels.
post #4 of 21
Thread Starter 
What grit stone(s) should I get? I was thinking DMT blue and red or similar for sharpening and polishing?

How difficult is it to hone edges without an angle guide? Should I worry about messing up the bevel with a stone if I de-burr without an edge guide?
post #5 of 21
Long term, the fixed angle SVST or other guides are well worth it, but on a budget, a Tools4Boards Razor is an accurate and durable option for both side and base bevel maintenance......but your focus should be on the side edge and not the base edge.

Getting a fixed 93°/87°/3° dedicated beveler, a 200 and 400 grit diamond (with lube) will help you to maintain your edges. From there you can add grits and files.

The DMTs are short term diamonds, SVSTs, Moonflexes, Maplus and others are long term diamonds if you keep them wet and clean.
post #6 of 21
Thread Starter 
What's the difference between the Razor and the Xact tools?
post #7 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by hmai18 View Post
What's the difference between the Razor and the Xact tools?
Here's our tuning tip entry on the Razor vs Xact.
post #8 of 21
Thread Starter 
Thanks. The description of the Xact says the knob can be used to dial in any side edge angle between 0* and 6*. Are these done in 0.5* increments, or is it completely free range?

The reason I ask is that I'd like to be able to take my base edges to 0.7* without having to go back to the shop and paying for another sharpening if I find the 0.5* too grabby.
post #9 of 21
The instructions for both the Xact & Razor are found on our Resources page. With the Xact's dial, you can interpolate to any angle increment and match existing side edge angles. While the pegs of the Razor are 1/2° angles. Since the Xact only uses the small included file for base edges, and my preference would be stones, I'd feel more confident with a SVST TFC or SkiMan adjustable base beveler, if I wished to micro manage base bevels between .5 and 1°.

Are your bases absolutely, perfectly flat? It won't take much to truly be off .25° (or .5° for that matter) while maintain base bevel angle geometry. Again, I'd focus on the side edge maintenance and accuracy for now.
post #10 of 21
Thread Starter 
The shop tune included a stone grind, so they should be. But again, I'm more interested in maintaining my side edges with diamond stones right now.

I suppose I can always take them back to the shop and pay a small fee to have them re-beveled to 0.7 or I can detune the tips if I find 0.5 to be too much.
post #11 of 21
I just had my bases ground 'as flat as possible' and found slight variations on the edges. I then set one pair of base bevels to '.5°' (3° side) and the other pair to 1.0° (2° side) as an experiment to feel the difference by swapping skis on each foot. Since my all-mountain Legend 8000's are not a high performance carver, the differences are noticeable but easily adaptable. On anything, including hardpack/manmade, I can't imagine that I'd be able to notice a substantial enough difference between a .5° & .7° to feel the need to mess with the geometry further. The differences clearly become more washed out, the softer the snow. YMMV, though, depending on your priorities and sensitivity, have a shop dial in the geometry might be worth it versus buying more precision oriented tools for the short run.

Avoid detuning the tips and tails. Try increasing base bevels and possible lessoning side edge angles.
post #12 of 21
Thread Starter 
Thanks to Terry for all of his help. He was able to put together a package that worked for my needs within my budget. Can't wait to get everything.
post #13 of 21
Did he sell you the secret sauce? or tell you how to make your own?
post #14 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by Max Capacity View Post
Did he sell you the secret sauce? or tell you how to make your own?
To make your own Secret Sauce, pour the tan before the black:



Glad to help hmai18.
post #15 of 21
If you start at a .5 degree base bevel you will be at 1 degree before too long anyways, by snow abrasion and if you do any diamond stoning.

Aiming for .5 is a good idea to give you some room to grow so to speak. Greater then 1 degree is not good.
post #16 of 21
Thread Starter 
Blerg. I won't be able to get out again until next weekend. I'm looking forward to testing these new edges. Hopefully my diamond stones will arrive before then so I can give them a good polish before setting out.
post #17 of 21
Thread Starter 
Got everything yesterday. Just wanted to check about correct procedure: I wet the stones in a 50/50 alcohol/water mixture before sharpening my edges, right?

Will plain old isopropyl work?
post #18 of 21
Glad you got the stuff. Regarding isopropyl, I've never used it and I don't think it's wrong to use it. There have been several comments that a site search might give other views quickly.

Have fun getting and keeping your edges honed.

HTH
post #19 of 21
Quote:
How difficult is it to hone edges without an angle guide?
Fuggedaboudit. The only thing that should be done without a guide (better with one) is to stone off any metal raised by hitting a rock. This may be work-hardened too hard for a file and needs to be stoned anyway.

Quote:
I can detune the tips if I find 0.5 to be too much.
As Terry said, do not de-tune. Keep them sharp all the way to the tips and tails. You might prefer to taper the tip and tail base edges to 1°, however.
post #20 of 21
Thread Starter 
Is a spray bottle the best way of wetting the stones? Is it going to be a huge deal if I use regular H20 instead of doing a 50 mix with denatured alcohol?
post #21 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by hmai18 View Post
Is a spray bottle the best way of wetting the stones? Is it going to be a huge deal if I use regular H20 instead of doing a 50 mix with denatured alcohol?
The fact you are using the stones and diamonds wet is good rather than dry. Using alcohol or other 'lube/cleaners' is better, however and denatured alcohol is cheap. I use a spray bottle and periodically brush to clean because I can keep stones in the guides and not need to remove them to dip them in a cup. A sponge or wet cloth is another easy approach.
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