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Some new wax - purple Purl

post #1 of 13
Thread Starter 
I tuned and waxed my family's skis this weekend, and had a few new waxes to try out. I put the warm weather 1 Ball Jay Viper on a couple - very smooth application and easy to brush in (slight amount of fluroro in it). Thought I'd try the purple Purl wax since it has a huge temperature range (5 -35 F). Man, that was a much harder wax to get to melt and scrape. I still have some wavy areas that didn't buff down, so I left it to see if skiing will wear it off. It's touted as a microcrystalline wax, and I wonder if that's the reason for the extra hardness it seems to have?
post #2 of 13
I'm not a fan of their waxes. They do seem to have decent durability, decent glide, but they are horrible to scrape and buff. I don't see that Purl's waxes provide anything that you can't get from almost all other manufacturers except...

Your scrapers need to be really sharp, you'd better have arms like Popeye, and you'd better have a lot of free time. When the wax cools you almost have to chisel the wax off, then the brushing takes forever to get totally buffed out.
post #3 of 13

On colder, harder waxes, hot smearing is one method to minimize the amount of wax left to scape and brush. As is light hot scraping (also found on then waxing tips link). Also, using fiberlene or shop towels between iron and base to absorb excess wax helps. You definitely need to use a sharp scraper.


Edited by Alpinord - 11/24/15 at 6:04am
post #4 of 13
Thread Starter 
Thanks for the info, Alpinord. I might give hot scraping a try. This would be after seeing how good the skiing is on the Purl purple in the first place this weekend.
post #5 of 13
Remember that the intent is to put wax into the base and not on. Less is more and an ultra thin layer is what you are after. The harder waxes should increase durability and reduce the number of times you need to wax. Happy gliding.
post #6 of 13
The problem with the Purl wax being hard is that purple is their all-temp. It shouldn't be that hard. I actually don't think it's that hard just way too much parafin in it
post #7 of 13
Thread Starter 

Tried the hot scrape method last weekend with the purple Purl wax.  After initial application on my rock skis, I scraped it off hot.  Then I ironed it back in and hot scraped again.  After brushing, it looked pretty good.  Only downside to the hot scrape method that I could tell was a gunky mess on the plastic scraper.  It wasn't too hard to clean up though.  I liked the results, so I did my daily driver skis too.

 

On the slope, it was a tad sticky the first run, then seemed to be a nice glide after that.  Since only the bunny slope at Park City was open, I really needed some good glide.

post #8 of 13

Just wondering what the temps were at the time.
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by SpikeDog View PostOn the slope, it was a tad sticky the first run, then seemed to be a nice glide after that.  Since only the bunny slope at Park City was open, I really needed some good glide.
post #9 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by skierhj View Post

The problem with the Purl wax being hard is that purple is their all-temp. It shouldn't be that hard.

I actually /like/ that about it.

Beats the stink out of CH7 for longevity and the Purl doesn't get that squeaky "three days without waxing and we just had a cold snap, what WERE you thinking" grabbiness that CH7 gets on refreeze or crust.

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post #10 of 13
Thread Starter 

Temp was about 25F.  It felt colder towards the end of the day, but that was just the wind.

post #11 of 13

The hot smear link above didn't go to any sort of discussion, so I presume it's similar to my approach:  Melt a little onto the iron and wipe it onto the ski after warming the whole base with the iron first.  I usually do a base in thirds and then keep running the iron tip to tail and back to smooth it all out.

 

I use Purl's blue and purple mixed together (I put the two blocks together and melt all four edges slightly to keep them together).

 

I rarely get enough build-up to need scraping, but I do use a waxing paper as a last wipe with the iron.  Makes the finish somewhat more smooth.  I just brush enough to get a shine and don't worry about an occasional ridge here or there.  If I over-apply, a warm scraping takes care of the excess.  A swipe with a file cleans the scraper pretty well.

 

I'm not a speedster or racer, I only want a reliable slick slide.  Purl's durability for me is about a week unless I'm on all man-made.  Then I'm lucky to get two days.

post #12 of 13

We use these waxes from Ski-Kare a fair amount in our shop on rental equipment and snowboards.  These waxes are very durable and give good gliding results for the money.  True enough, they are tough to scrape without a very sharp scraper.  One of my shop guys calls it "Dog S--t", but I like the performance.  To make it easier on ourselves, we apply a liberal coat of wax and let everything cool completely (at least 20-30 minutes), then before we scrape, hit the waxed base with the iron briefly to warm the whole works back up (although not hot enough to totally remelt the wax), then immediately scrape while still warm, and brush thoroughly. This warm scraping technique is also good with harder, cold weather waxes.  You might try it.  Good luck. 

post #13 of 13

The Hot Smearing link is fixed. Here's a Light Hot Scraping post to help remove excess wax before cooling.
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Kneale Brownson View Post
 

The hot smear link above didn't go to any sort of discussion........


Edited by Alpinord - 11/24/15 at 6:05am
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