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Boots For Me And The Prophet 90.

post #1 of 21
Thread Starter 
I'm Looking for a good boot for the Line Prophet 90 which I will be purchasing soon. I ski about 50% groomed, and 50% backcountry/powder/glades/bumps etc... What is the best boot for me? I'm planning on sticking with my Atomic B-Tech B50 boots for this year. How much difference is it going to make by me going to better, higher performance, and more specific boot? I do notice my boots flex a lot, I believe this is known as the Flex Index which is 50 for my boots, what rating of flex index should my next pare of boots be? What are some boots to look at, keeping money in mind. Also, after buying the Atomic B-Tech boots, it took like 4 or 5 trips out to the mountain for them to like break in and stop absolutely killing my feet? Is this normal, should I have to deal with the pain all over again by buying a new boot?

Thanks guys.
post #2 of 21
Boot fitter
Boot fitter
Boot fitter


Boots are mated to the skier, not the ski
post #3 of 21
red boots, they are 5% faster, but you can't ride them switch or they blow up
post #4 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by mntlion View Post
red boots, they are 5% faster, but you can't ride them switch or they blow up
Nope.....I got blue ones this year and they are like tooootallllly better than last year's red ones.

SJ
post #5 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gahan View Post
Also, after buying the Atomic B-Tech boots, it took like 4 or 5 trips out to the mountain for them to like break in and stop absolutely killing my feet? Is this normal, should I have to deal with the pain all over again by buying a new boot?
Remember, no pain, no gain. It should take at least 10 days of intense pain before they fit right if they're good boots.

Oh, yeah, my new orange ones are da bomb. Buy by color - everyone knows that.
post #6 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by snofun3 View Post
Remember, no pain, no gain. It should take at least 10 days of intense pain before they fit right if they're good boots.

Oh, yeah, my new orange ones are da bomb. Buy by color - everyone knows that.
I have orange boots too!! What a coincidence! I guess that must mean your RIP as hard as I do... either that, or you're one of those posers. Either way, ORANGE BOOTS are the shiznit!
post #7 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gahan View Post
What is the best boot for me?
The best boot is the one that fits both your feet and your performance demands.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Gahan View Post
How much difference is it going to make by me going to better, higher performance, and more specific boot?
If the boot is properly fitted, the difference is going to be night and day.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Gahan View Post
...what rating of flex index should my next pare of boots be?
Flex ratings will vary from boot company to boot company. Choose one that supports your body mass and aggression level.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Gahan View Post
What are some boots to look at, keeping money in mind.
Not enough information was given to make an answer. Actually you should see a bootfitter in your region to fit you properly. Who knows? You might get fitted into a Nordica Beast 10.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Gahan View Post
Also, after buying the Atomic B-Tech boots, it took like 4 or 5 trips out to the mountain for them to like break in and stop absolutely killing my feet? Is this normal, should I have to deal with the pain all over again by buying a new boot?
There is a break in period, so expect some discomfort.

The reality is that there are a lot of variables to get a good fitting boot. There is no such thing as a slam bam thank you ma'am bootfit. Finding someone to spend the time by listening to your needs, examining your foot, and fitting the boots to you is very important. Don't be afraid to spend a little extra money for a good fit. Those are your feet.

Dennis

PS In regards to color, once you go black...
post #8 of 21
I wish I could wear orange boots, but my left foot is a practicing Mennonite, so only black on that foot.
post #9 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by JayPowHound View Post
I have orange boots too!! What a coincidence! I guess that must mean your RIP as hard as I do... either that, or you're one of those posers. Either way, ORANGE BOOTS are the shiznit!
I was thinking about getting a full face for flat hills - any color recommendations?
post #10 of 21
Rear entry boots are the best! They are SUPER comfy and lots of extra room in there to wear REALLY thick socks....
post #11 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by locknload View Post
Rear entry boots are the best! They are SUPER comfy and lots of extra room in there to wear REALLY thick socks....
Forget thick socks, the new steeze for all the gnar cats out there is 2 or more pairs of socks. Bonus style points if you can do it with thick socks. I hear its the one thing that Tanner and Bode agree on, 2 pairs of socks. Its that cool. I bet even Richie and Jer can agree that 2 pairs are the way to go.
post #12 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by snofun3 View Post
I was thinking about getting a full face for flat hills - any color recommendations?
Gotta go with the flames! Red an Black.


Quote:
Originally Posted by locknload View Post
Rear entry boots are the best! They are SUPER comfy and lots of extra room in there to wear REALLY thick socks....
Not to mention they leave plenty of space to tuck in your long underwear and the powder cuffs on the bottom of your snow pants!!

post #13 of 21
Hopefully our sarcasm hasn't obscured the REAL point here. The only RIGHT boots are the ones that fit your foot well...as determined by a reputable bootfitter. Its simply not something that can be answered over a web-board.
post #14 of 21
wow is this TGR????
post #15 of 21
Thread Starter 
Thanks for your responses guys.

So does each brand have different fitting boots specifically for different types of feet? How does a boot fitter make the boot you have chosen for the specific type of skiing that you do fit your feet properly? Do good boots come with different inserts or something?
post #16 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gahan View Post
Thanks for your responses guys.

So does each brand have different fitting boots specifically for different types of feet? How does a boot fitter make the boot you have chosen for the specific type of skiing that you do fit your feet properly? Do good boots come with different inserts or something?
OK, so after my couple of sarcastic responses I'll give you a real one.

Brands of ski boots tend to fit differently. Some are wide, some are narrow, etc. Pretty much all of the brands offer beginner, intermediate, and expert models of different varieties. The key is to figure out which brand(s) fit your foot, then pick a model that works for the type of skiing that you do. As for inserts, many boots do come with a pack of pieces which your fitter may or may not use depending on your foot. Where do you live? This site has a board that recommends fitters in what ever area you may live in. That would be a good place to start. It is DEF worth finding someone who knows what he's doing to get fit rather than going to a big box store and having a college student with a part time job try to sell you a boot. Good luck!

post #17 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gahan View Post
Thanks for your responses guys.

So does each brand have different fitting boots specifically for different types of feet? How does a boot fitter make the boot you have chosen for the specific type of skiing that you do fit your feet properly? Do good boots come with different inserts or something?
Some boot companies are known for traditionally having one type of fit or "last" (boot slang for the general size/shape of the shell). Within each company there are some variances between models. For example race boots are always much narrower, but this is due to the fact that all race boots will be modified (read more below). A good bootfitter will find the boot that is closest to your foot shape/type first and then mod it as need be. If a bootfitter doesn't shell fit you first, leave.

There are MANY types of modifications that can be done to boots. the first thing to get done is custom foot beds, this will provide your foot with the necessary arch support, but will also change how your foot fits into the boot, usually allowing you to go a size smaller. Other modifications include the removal/stretching of shell material, much easier and more effective than the opposite technique of adding padding in strategic locations. this is why race boots are tighter, they just have more material in the shell, this allows them to custom fit better. There are also adjustments involving the griding of soles to correct for bow legs and whatever the opposite of that is called.

new boots will hurt a bit, but that goes away. Boots that feel great at first will not feel great in the long run and the pain will be far worse.

Are you sure this isn't a troll?? No offense intended and I am trying to help as much as possible (Ask the Boot Guys can give even better info), but these just don't seem like the kind of question that someone who is skiing glades would need to ask. Its pretty much ski gear 101.

If you are indeed not a troll, good luck on the hunt and Welcome to Epic!!
post #18 of 21
Okay, I may not post here alot but I have to say with those kind of questions you need to send me these skis to make sure they work. Ill send them back as soon as testing is complete.
post #19 of 21
Gahan,

You got great advice from Jaypowhound and Dumpy. I really have nothing to add other than to make finding the right boot the highest priority in terms of your ski gear.
post #20 of 21
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by dumpy View Post
Some boot companies are known for traditionally having one type of fit or "last" (boot slang for the general size/shape of the shell). Within each company there are some variances between models. For example race boots are always much narrower, but this is due to the fact that all race boots will be modified (read more below). A good bootfitter will find the boot that is closest to your foot shape/type first and then mod it as need be. If a bootfitter doesn't shell fit you first, leave.

There are MANY types of modifications that can be done to boots. the first thing to get done is custom foot beds, this will provide your foot with the necessary arch support, but will also change how your foot fits into the boot, usually allowing you to go a size smaller. Other modifications include the removal/stretching of shell material, much easier and more effective than the opposite technique of adding padding in strategic locations. this is why race boots are tighter, they just have more material in the shell, this allows them to custom fit better. There are also adjustments involving the griding of soles to correct for bow legs and whatever the opposite of that is called.

new boots will hurt a bit, but that goes away. Boots that feel great at first will not feel great in the long run and the pain will be far worse.

Are you sure this isn't a troll?? No offense intended and I am trying to help as much as possible (Ask the Boot Guys can give even better info), but these just don't seem like the kind of question that someone who is skiing glades would need to ask. Its pretty much ski gear 101.

If you are indeed not a troll, good luck on the hunt and Welcome to Epic!!
Thanks a lot for your insight. First off, what is a "Troll"???????
Sounds like a term you internet forum people use a lot. Anyway, ill admit it I'm not all that up to date on all the technicalities of ski equipment. I'm 16 years old, started skiing 5 years ago. Two years ago I started skiing 20-30 times a year so I bought my own skis. I went to the local ski shop, bought a pare of Atomic B50 boots, and Atomic Izor Carbon skis. Now two ski seasons later I have been skiing less groomed trails, and more out of bounds stuff, more glads, and powder whenever the opportunity arises. And I'm actually getting quite good at it too. I skid at Sun Shine Village in Banff, and skied many times at Sugerloaf in Maine. I live in New Brunswick. A little wile ago, I started looking at new skis, and I realized that I'm using my skis for exactly what their not meant to be used for. This is the first time I really ever looked into the details of ski equipment. I really don't know why its such a big thing that I'm uneducated about the details of ski equipment... I just like to ski that's all.
post #21 of 21
A troll is an internet jackass who asks unusual questions to get us going. They ruin it for other people who have legitimate questions. Unfortunately trolls are all over the place.

Equipment is a big deal as it can make your ski day that much more enjoyable. It doesn't need to be the latest, greatest or most expensive, it just needs to be the right stuff for what you are doing. With boots that means the best fit. Boots are the most important by a long ways, then skis and bindings at about equal with skis having a slight edge. Then poles.

get a proper fitting boot, it will make more difference than anything. Find a good shop and go with what they say. the Prophet 90 will work well for the type of skiing you are doing.
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