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All day kid'd program or 2 hour private?

post #1 of 29
Thread Starter 
On our upcoming trip to Killington, I'm looking to see about getting my daughter some lessons. She's 11 and been on skis 3-4 times. She can wedge/snow plow down the bunny hill and ride the lift for the bunny hill (a slow quad chair). She doesn't really have the full hang of turning though as she blows down the hill in a wedge, but she does have decent balanace to stay upright and in control. I'm curious as to what instructors and others with similar experiences would recommend, an all day kid's program (9am - 3pm, which she'll push back on I'm sure) or a 2 hour private lesson? They are almost the same price and I'm curious as to which might be better to get her going.

Thanks!
post #2 of 29
Go for the private that way the 2 of you can ski after lesson together and she can show you what she has learned. Ask the instructor after the lesson what they were doing and any advice they would have for her to continue doing. My best advice would be not to take her up any steeper terrain than what she was learning on so she can get lots of mileage ingraining proper technique and not falling into bad movements trying to survive terrain that is over her level right now. You and her can have lots of fun skiing on the green runs at Ramshead and over at Snowshed.
post #3 of 29
snowblower,

Great advise.,

RW
post #4 of 29
^What he said^
post #5 of 29
I think of it this way . . . do I want my kid going through drills one by one in a group, getting cold standing around, in a lesson designed for everyone, with minimal individual attention, or do I want an instructor that can focus completely on them, match every exercise to their skill level, choose terrain just for the kid, and move them along faster . . . you get my point.

Sometimes I think the all-day format was created more for the parents that don't want to ski with their kids for that day
post #6 of 29
Thread Starter 
Thanks everyone!

Snowbowler, you make way too much sense .
post #7 of 29
Private....

Then as she can ski blues....she'll love the all days.

If your daughter has any atheletic skills (unlike my spelling), a good instructor will have her rocking the hill in 2 hrs.
post #8 of 29
As a parent with a 9 year old and a 7 year old that hadn't been on snow before, I put them into the Kids program at Stowe last March.
They really enjoyed it, and I can't praise the instructing team enough. The kids progressed well and moved up a group every day.
They skied every afternoon with me for a couple of runs to close out the day and were able to show me what they'd learned.
Maybe I'm a bad parent jerry5757, but they had a great week. They got a first class grounding in technique and learned their own way around the mountain, making new friends every day.
Perhaps it's different as they get more proficient, but I wouldn't necessarily rule out group lessons out of hand.
CW:-)
post #9 of 29
I think the decision depends on the age, ability, and temperament of the child. Almost everyone can benefit more from a private lesson than from a group lesson. But for very young children a group lesson can be almost as good and many times more fun. My daughter loved loved going to skiwee. For her it was playing with other kids in the snow. Kids can sometimes learn from each other too.

If, however, the child is a little self-conscious, very shy, really struggling (or perceive to be struggling) with skiing, a private lesson may be the better option. Or to put it another way, spending the additional money for a private may be more than worth it. You might also consider asking for your child's input. At 11, a child definitely has ideas about what might be best for her.

Good luck.

Tom
post #10 of 29
my son is a shade under 6 years, and learnt how to ski at catamount beginning around 4ish in their program called mountain cats. superb attention, gentle and clever instruction, and today is a level 6 skiier, ready for races but not sure we as parents can make the drives on weekends especially since he splits time between mom and dad. the kids program at mountain cats at the small hill at catamount, is really very good. group lessons work and camaraderie on skis is a lifelong thing, now aint that a fact..go group..there will be time for private. though really dependent on the school .. like in any other institution of learning...
post #11 of 29
For a 11yo, she can definitely go either way. My take is that for a short trip and if you have more in the budget, go private. If it's a week long trip, go group/camp. The key is to pick a good ski school. You will win out either way. (don't know anything about Killington's reputation for instructions)

Keep in mind, although more is presented in a private setting, it doesn't mean everything is retained after the lesson (especially due to her age). From that standpoint, a group setting will allow for more time practicing with the instructor/coach present. A bit of peer pressure amongst the group doesn't hurt either.

FWIW, we typically just do group on ski trips due to money reasons. But, because of the time of year, we often (about 30 to 40% of the time) run into situations where a group lesson turning into a private or semi-private.

IMHO, if there is a strong preference with one over the other (besides $ or time issues), it should come from the child. And, I think it might be personality based like someone else has already pointed out.

Good luck.
post #12 of 29
Id like to add that easy pitch but twisty terrain build skills naturals with out actually teaching anything.

something as simple as linking every little jump, roll or narrow spot on the hill can get kids to turn and actually want to.

which is way better than the wedge of the doom straight down a steeper blue.
post #13 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by BushwackerinPA View Post
Id like to add that easy pitch but twisty terrain build skills naturals with out actually teaching anything.

something as simple as linking every little jump, roll or narrow spot on the hill can get kids to turn and actually want to.

which is way better than the wedge of the doom straight down a steeper blue.
There is a very good point to be made in there. When kids are just learning and you ( meaning the parent) are skiing with them. try to round off turns and lenghten out the turn, not as much down the hill as more across and up the hill. When an adult skis their weight and momentum moves them along and further down hill faster than a child. The child trying to keep up cuts off the corners and bee lines it straight usually in a power wedge. Definately more pronounced on blue square terrain but it happens on easy green terrain also.
As BWPA says turn, turn again and turn some more, look for things to turn around, could be little twigs on the snow, or back and forth over a groomer ridge.
post #14 of 29
Thread Starter 
I talked with her about it over the last couple of days and she surprised me. I thought for sure she would opt for the private lesson, feeling that 1-on-1 carried less pressure and she wouldn't want to spend 9am-3pm without me on the mountain. Instead, she really wants to do the group day-long program because she wanted to be with other kids and thought it might be more fun. As long as she could ski the next day with me, she really wanted the group lesson. Killington does have the "max 5" guarantee, so 6 hours with 4 other kids seems like a decent setup.
post #15 of 29
remember, its gonna run you $180 for the full day unless you've found some sort of discount. POWDR has upped the prices quite a bit.
post #16 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by ChappyOnIce View Post
I talked with her about it over the last couple of days and she surprised me. I thought for sure she would opt for the private lesson, feeling that 1-on-1 carried less pressure and she wouldn't want to spend 9am-3pm without me on the mountain. Instead, she really wants to do the group day-long program because she wanted to be with other kids and thought it might be more fun. As long as she could ski the next day with me, she really wanted the group lesson. Killington does have the "max 5" guarantee, so 6 hours with 4 other kids seems like a decent setup.
I think group is the right answer for the very reason she stated.
post #17 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by epic View Post
I think group is the right answer for the very reason she stated.
Yet many people still try to insist that you're lazy parents if you put the kids in all day programs. Most of those folks, though are non-parents.
post #18 of 29
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by SkiDork View Post
remember, its gonna run you $180 for the full day unless you've found some sort of discount. POWDR has upped the prices quite a bit.
I am aware and the 2 hour private is 188 which is why it was a wash as far as I'm concerned. That's my budget for her lessons while there. Any comments on the quality of instruction at Killington?
post #19 of 29
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by SkiDork View Post
Yet many people still try to insist that you're lazy parents if you put the kids in all day programs. Most of those folks, though are non-parents.
I don't consider that to be true especially if it is what my daughter prefers to do. The more important point is that it is encouraging her to learn and she will enjoy it more (and therefore learn more).
post #20 of 29
You can get a hodgepodge of ages in group lessons. Hopefully you can get her in with some "kids" her own age. It would be a long 6 hours with a bunch of boring non-athletic adults...
post #21 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by KZ1964 View Post
You can get a hodgepodge of ages in group lessons. Hopefully you can get her in with some "kids" her own age. It would be a long 6 hours with a bunch of boring non-athletic adults...
An 11 year old would not be placed in with adults, Killington has a separate ski/ride school at the Ramshead base area and the adults are based out of the Snowshed area. Most schools will try to get kids of a similiar age matched up but ability level is mainly the determining factor.
post #22 of 29
Killington kids instruction is very good, no worries there.

I think at her age she would qualify for Superstars.

BTW - I wasn;t implying you were lazy, in fact I think putting the kids in all day programs isn't lazy at all. We put our 2 in since they were 2. I would have been more than willing to take the time to ski with them but I found that they were both big whiners when they were out with us. In the programs, they had a lot of fun and didn't whine when they were out with the instructors. Much more productive for them. Now (age 8 and 11) they're both excellent skiers, and are over their whining stage. They're still in programs though but they both love their teams and their team-mates. Its still win win.
post #23 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by SkiDork View Post
Now (age 8 and 11) they're both excellent skiers, and are over their whining stage.
What is the secret to have 8 to 11 yos coming out of their whining stage?
post #24 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by chanwmr View Post
What is the secret to have 8 to 11 yos coming out of their whining stage?
well, lemme qualify that. THey don't whine about skiing any more. They still whine about other stuff though...
post #25 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by cardweg View Post
As a parent with a 9 year old and a 7 year old that hadn't been on snow before, I put them into the Kids program at Stowe last March.
They really enjoyed it, and I can't praise the instructing team enough. The kids progressed well and moved up a group every day.
They skied every afternoon with me for a couple of runs to close out the day and were able to show me what they'd learned.
Maybe I'm a bad parent jerry5757, but they had a great week. They got a first class grounding in technique and learned their own way around the mountain, making new friends every day.
Perhaps it's different as they get more proficient, but I wouldn't necessarily rule out group lessons out of hand.
CW:-)
skiing with friends their age makes it the worthwhile.
post #26 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by ChappyOnIce View Post
I talked with her about it over the last couple of days and she surprised me. I thought for sure she would opt for the private lesson, feeling that 1-on-1 carried less pressure and she wouldn't want to spend 9am-3pm without me on the mountain. Instead, she really wants to do the group day-long program because she wanted to be with other kids and thought it might be more fun. As long as she could ski the next day with me, she really wanted the group lesson. Killington does have the "max 5" guarantee, so 6 hours with 4 other kids seems like a decent setup.
Many adults like privates because they want to get maximum attention so that they will improve more quickly. Doesn't always work as well as they think it does, but if that's what's wanted, I accommodate my audience.

Not many kids want to be stuck by themselves with an adult. They'll have more fun, and in all likelihood learn a lot more in a group of other kids. For an 11-year old, a group of kids the same age is usually more important than the same ability, as long as the spread isn't too big.
post #27 of 29

Go private.

post #28 of 29

Put her in a program.  Peer pressure is a wonderful thing.

 

BK

post #29 of 29


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by cardweg View Post

 

Maybe I'm a bad parent jerry5757, but they had a great week. They got a first class grounding in technique and learned their own way around the mountain, making new friends every day.
Perhaps it's different as they get more proficient, but I wouldn't necessarily rule out group lessons out of hand.
CW:-)

Nah, you're not a bad parent, you've got your kids out skiing It's just my own bias, and should be taken that way. I may even put mine with a local ski group/school that only does groups next year, but as much for the social part as anything else. She gets tired of skiing with me and needs to have some other kids her age to make it more fun. So . . . I may even go against my own advice next year, yet I stick to my premise that private is more effecient in the long run because of the singular focus on one kid.

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