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Suggestions for Bump Skis?

post #1 of 14
Thread Starter 
Here in East Coast conditions, I'm going to start skiing bumps for a couple of hours each day.
I used to ski bumps, now I want to get back to it.
I'm 200 lbs, 6'0. Advanced skier on ice, crud and hardpack, a total putz in bumps.
I'm going to rent demos before I buy. Any suggestions?
post #2 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by Phlogiston View Post
Here in East Coast conditions, I'm going to start skiing bumps for a couple of hours each day.
I used to ski bumps, now I want to get back to it.
I'm 200 lbs, 6'0. Advanced skier on ice, crud and hardpack, a total putz in bumps.
I'm going to rent demos before I buy. Any suggestions?
I doubt that you'll find anyone to let you demo bump specific skis. They get trashed to quickly. That said, if you are interested in getting into moguls, buy a bump specific ski. Rossignol makes a good one as well as Volkl and Hart is back with the F17, which is good. In fact, they're all good for what you want. Go online to the various manufacturers websites and check them out. They'll also give you information about retailers in your area. Good luck
post #3 of 14
Oh ya, although buying a ski for bumps that may help you, nothing can help better than a good bump lesson or two. You may be better spending your money on lessons and using the skis you have, then go for new skis next year.
post #4 of 14
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lars View Post
Oh ya, although buying a ski for bumps that may help you, nothing can help better than a good bump lesson or two. You may be better spending your money on lessons and using the skis you have, then go for new skis next year.
I'm skiing on Atomic GS9s now; 180cm.
I don't WANT to learn how to ski bumps on these monsters.
As for lessons, I'd have to find a ski area that has good bump lessons.
I will never, ever, under any circumstances, take a lesson from any of the people who teach at the place where I normally ski.
It would be so much simpler to get a used pair of skis that are good for bumps, and re-learn what I used to know, with shaped skis.
post #5 of 14
All I'm saying is that bump skis aren't the majic cure all for good bump skiing.
post #6 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by Phlogiston View Post
I'm skiing on Atomic GS9s now; 180cm.
I don't WANT to learn how to ski bumps on these monsters.
........get a used pair of skis that are good for bumps, and re-learn what I used to know, with shaped skis.
You are right about that (no GS in the bumps, way stiff). I could add, go to a resort that is known for perfect packed-powder bumps, broad, smooth, even, with good skiers on them to keep them nice.
a note: the more side-cut (as in high performance shaped skis) the less suitable for smearing, buttering, side-slipping which is the mellow way to do bumps. a softish shaped ski or a pin tail would work as a bump/all purpose ski.
post #7 of 14
Thread Starter 
Thanks for the info.
I'm looking at videos and reading info about modern bump techniques; going to start out with some drills on groomers, move to the edge of the blue groomer that has a few bumps, and practice practice practice.
post #8 of 14
I like a softer ski in the bumps, especially when I'm learning.

Intermediate skis are softer skis.

I went with the Fischer AMC 73 a few years ago and it worked well for me. They are great all over the front side.

I don't think they make those anymore, so I would probably try the Watea 78 as a replacement.

Not only do intermediate skis work great to learn bumps, they're cheap(er), too!
post #9 of 14
Good book to read, Dan Depiro's mogul book. Depiro discusses why groomed snow carving techniques don't work well in the bumps. He offers the fact, the moguls dictate the path your skis take and with moguls you have a multi dimensional plane to ski on with the bumps representing high and low spots compared to goomed snow skiing .I thought the book was really good and provides alot of good instructional points you an take to the hill.

Probably in the history of skiing nobody became an accomplished mogul skier by just reading a book alone and their is no substitute for making thousands of runs in the bumps. I am offering the book as a suggestion since you thought your home area didn't offer much in the way of mogul instruction. As for skis for bumps, their are certainly better skis for the bumps than you are on now, but I wouldn't get too concerned about that right now. I'd say get going on some mogul skiing movement patterns now and you can get some better bumps skis later. Glen Plake many years ago used to ski bumps on DH skis. I'm going to guess at the area you ski at, the bumps typically have very scraped icy troughs that a stiffer ski will work pretty well in. Just my two cents. Good luck.
post #10 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lars View Post
Oh ya, although buying a ski for bumps that may help you, nothing can help better than a good bump lesson or two. You may be better spending your money on lessons and using the skis you have, then go for new skis next year.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lars View Post
All I'm saying is that bump skis aren't the majic cure all for good bump skiing.
Ditto on technique over the ski. I've always thought the best bump ski was the ski that had the best bump skier on it.
post #11 of 14
Shoot, I've been meaning to pass on this received wisdom for the last couple of weeks. Mr Nobody told me that his mother always said, "you're not really an expert if you can't ski bumps." I like that. Not that you have to like them, mind you (I, for one, do).
post #12 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by davluri View Post
You are right about that (no GS in the bumps, way stiff). I could add, go to a resort that is known for perfect packed-powder bumps, broad, smooth, even, with good skiers on them to keep them nice.
a note: the more side-cut (as in high performance shaped skis) the less suitable for smearing, buttering, side-slipping which is the mellow way to do bumps. a softish shaped ski or a pin tail would work as a bump/all purpose ski.
actually a soft GS ski aint bad in the bumps.

the biggest issue with GS9 is the lack of edge feel. all cap atomics have this same feeling.

but yeah get either bump ski or a narrow twin tip, but the bump lesson will go a long way.
post #13 of 14
I agree about the GS Ski being Ok for bumps. I have a pair of Rossi RX World cups in a 167 that are a blast to ski in the bumps.
post #14 of 14
Given a choice with the high performance skis of the past, I always preferred a GS type ski in the bumps. As opposed to a Slalom they tend to have a softer tip and foreflex and less sidecut.
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