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carving skis work the body, hard

post #1 of 10
Thread Starter 
having been on the pseudo race boards (stockli SR XL), all sharp edges and major sidecut for over a week now as we are skiing chalk and (western) ice mostly. noticed something: core muscles totally worked, sore and tired at the end of a day, and the knees are tender. It's the snow, and it's the skis, riding hard on your edges. anyone else relate?
post #2 of 10
Core yes. Knees no. If your knees are sore you're probably skiing with too much knee angulation or you're skiing in the backseat... or both.

Hard snow allows forces to build in a turn that normally crush the surface of soft or brittle snow, so you end up resisting higher forces - thus your body gets more of a workout. You may also find yourself moving inside of the turn and creating higher angles with more upper and lower body separation, so you're moving outside of the range of motion that you're usually accustomed to being in. You may also experience this kind of soreness anytime you're skiing terrain that forces you to move outside of your typical range of motion - it isn't just isolated to carving.

Later

Greg
post #3 of 10
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by HeluvaSkier View Post
Core yes. Knees no. If your knees are sore you're probably skiing with too much knee angulation or you're skiing in the backseat... or both.

Hard snow allows forces to build in a turn that normally crush the surface of soft or brittle snow, so you end up resisting higher forces - thus your body gets more of a workout. You may also find yourself moving inside of the turn and creating higher angles with more upper and lower body separation, so you're moving outside of the range of motion that you're usually accustomed to being in. You may also experience this kind of soreness anytime you're skiing terrain that forces you to move outside of your typical range of motion - it isn't just isolated to carving.

Later

Greg
what you said. I was in the process of re-mounting the toe pieces forward after getting smaller boot shells, so the backseat issue (fighting to stay forward) is resolved. I was thinking that the angulation positions have been extreme and the loads pretty massive. Inside the turn is a concept I imagine would be related to racing type turns and the terminology is unfamiliar, but when facing directly down hill, and the skis arc way the heck outside of my center, and the turn starts way early before the fall line, I feel something super dynamic that is probably what you are saying. yeah, you are correct on all counts, as usual, thanks greg.
post #4 of 10
More high g turns per run = more tiring. No doubt about it.

Using a t-bar instead of a chair adds to it as does no waiting at the lift, as I found out today.
post #5 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by davluri View Post
having been on the pseudo race boards (stockli SR XL), all sharp edges and major sidecut for over a week now as we are skiing chalk and (western) ice mostly. noticed something: core muscles totally worked, sore and tired at the end of a day, and the knees are tender. It's the snow, and it's the skis, riding hard on your edges. anyone else relate?
My knees used to bother me after a hard day of skiing.
I work my legs at the gym a lot so I knew it was not an out of shape issue. I finally went to a PT and to my surprise, they narrowed it to me being to tight. The pain in my knee's was generated from my hip abductors. They gave me a few stretching excersises and never a bit of pain since.................Go figure. I think too many of us don't stretch enough..........
post #6 of 10
Quote:
I think too many of us don't stretch enough..........
Agreed. And the older we get, the more important this becomes. Think I'll go do my calf stretches (I have heel spurs) right now.
post #7 of 10
Older body on SL skis. I always stretch before skiing. It gets me in the mood.
post #8 of 10
the first couple days just blasting SL turns this year my lower abs and obliques were worked.

in fact my legs dont get tired anymore just my core and concentration.
post #9 of 10
Thread Starter 
yah, need to warm up better (function: age). pulled a back muscle while making a good turn, if a high g turn with major rotation. no jamb or jerk, no slip or thrash; just a good set of turns on a steep, firm face, and thwaaaang! zap: core distressed!
post #10 of 10
This maybe also a function of what your body is used to as after a day of carving I feel absolutely great whereas after a day in bumpy, wet powder snow or moguls I feel miserable.

Ditto to stretching and conditioning. I would recommend conditioning like short sprints, jump rope, squats (using very light weight), and crunches.

If your knees are tender this is possibly a sign of the lower body compensating for a tired core. For carving you can and should be doing more turning with your hips, arms, and back.
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