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Earthquake in Jackson Hole - Page 2

post #31 of 48
I survived an earthquake back in the mid 80's. Southern Cal.

The eeriest thing was there was one dog barking.....just before it hit and afterwards.

Scary stuff.

I have felt them here in Maine, as well. But, So. Cali really rocks!!
post #32 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob Peters View Post
It was funny up on the hill today. A lot of people never even felt it but some (like me) felt it a LOT. It's a very strange sensation.

Many stories this morning about dogs barking right before the quake. It sure makes you wonder.
Ha! Finally, something I have more experience at than Bob. I grew up in L.A. and have had numerous first hand earthquake encounters.
post #33 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob Peters View Post
When the Yellowstone supervolcano goes, you'll be skiing ten feet of ash.
Mmmmmm, freshies!!!! I'll be on the first chair.
post #34 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by spindrift View Post
Apparently it was big enough to knock household stuff around in the Bighorn Basin. However, I was busy being a little kid in seismically sleepy Queens...
It is one of my earliest memories. I was a 2 year old kid in Sheridan, and I remember waking up and seeing the rocking chair violently moving.

Mike
post #35 of 48
Thread Starter 
This whole subject encouraged me to fire up the google machine to look up a little more info about the Yellowstone supervolcano.

One thing that has fascinated me for some time about Yellowstone is the concept of how HUGE the caldera is. If you drive through the park, a good share of the current topography of the landscape is actually the bottom of the crater left over from the last giant eruption, which was about 630,00 years ago.

Then, if you drive from Ashton, Idaho, up to Big Sky, Montana, about fifty miles of that drive will be through the bottom of the crater left over from the PREVIOUS eruption, which was about 1.3 million years ago.

And if you look at this map (from the following incredibly interesting site http://www.swisseduc.ch/stromboli/perm/yellowstone/geol-en.html):



Those blue, red, yellow, and brown splotches are identified calderas from explosions of the Yellowstone supervolcano going back as far as 16.5 million years. The hotspot underneath present-day Yellowstone Park stays constant as the North American plate slowly (I mean REALLY slowly) drifts over it toward the southwest on its way to the San Andreas Fault where it dives under the Pacific plate, I guess.

Every 700,000 years or so, the Yellowstone supervolcano explodes, leaving another caldera to slowly march its way toward California.

And speaking of ash, this image from the same site:



shows the portion of North America that was heavily covered in ash by the last explosion of the supervolcano, 630,000 years ago. If you read the accomanying text, it explains that THIS explosion was pretty mild compared to the third-to-the-most-recent one 2.1 million years ago. Here's what it says, with my bolding added:

The previous caldera forming eruption of 1.3 million years before present produced 280, the one of 2.1 million years a staggering 2450 cubic kilometers of ash. These and the Toba caldera of Sumatra are among the greatest quartenary volcanic eruptions known worldwide. In comparison, the 1980 eruption of Mount St. Helens seems minute: only 1.3 cubic kilometers of lava was erupted. The most recent volcanic eruptions took place at Yellowstone 70'000 years ago. For more detailed information go to "Volcanic History of the Yellowstone Plateau Volcanic Field" by the USGS and University of Utah.

This is just fascinating stuff.
post #36 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by Phlogiston View Post
Anyone remember that Italian guy who skied down the hot ashes of Etna, and straight into the ocean, where a boat was waiting for him?
The heat of the ashes he was skiing on melted the bottoms of his skis, but they held together.
When the Supervolcano comes... we'll all be skiing on ashes and cinders.
And there's a whole book about the Hebgen Lake quake, and all the people killed by landslides (assumed, bodies never recovered).
Fitting post for a guy with your screen name.
post #37 of 48
The swarms of earthquakes in Yellowstone have not subsided but have slacked off a bit. I would not see any real significance in them because they have not been centered in the same location since the beginning and are in the central part of the caldera instead of at the perimeter regions. These things are known to unzip from the perimeter. So we are 40k years overdue for an eruption. We could be another 40k years to the next one and there is at least two theories predicting that there will be no more eruptions of Yellowstone for another 30 million years.

There is ample indication that we are undergoing a magnetic polar shift. These shifts take a long time but we have been in it for the past thousand or so years. It's believed that volcanism will increase prior to the total shift. There are currently several places on the globe where the compass points south. The overall magnetic strength has decreased by about 40% over the last 500 years.

The Mayan calender ends in 2012 and many prophicies end near the same time if you believe all that crap.
post #38 of 48
Hey bob, you see another caldera pattern there, a bit south of ya?

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/La_Garita_Caldera
post #39 of 48
Hey Bob,
Why is that text comparing "2450 cubic kilometers of ash" with "only 1.3 cubic kilometers of lava" ..?

St. Helen's probably put out a quite lot more ash than that, though it put out very little lava. It had a lot of pyroclastic flows down the side as well as plenty of ash sent over to Yakima (and elsewhere).


I was skiing at Ski Acres (now Summit Central) Feb 28, 2001 with a friend when the Niqually Quake hit. At 10:54 am we were just about to enter a wide open run from the side when the snow started jumping around. My friend was from Minnesota and had never experienced a quake before.

He said, "HEY! The grounds moving..!"
I said, "Yeah, must be an earthquake..."
He said, "BUT, The Ground's Shaking!!!"
I said, "Yeah John, it's an earthquake..."
He said, "BUT... it's shaking! the ground is shaking..!!!"
I said, "Yeah, it's just an earthquake... you know, an earthquake..?"
He said... "But the ground is shaking! It's really shaking..!"
( This went on 'till the quake subsided )

Did I mention he was from Minnesota?

.ma
post #40 of 48
In the Long Valley Caldera of CA:
"U.S. Geological Survey scientists are tracking continuing dome-like swelling centered in the low forested hills in the middle of the caldera. This swelling affects more than 100 square miles and is caused by magma rising beneath the Earth's surface."
Mammoth is on the edge of this caldera; and the increasing tree kill from toxic gasses is part of the pattern.
Hot springs in the area have become unpredictable and dangerous. Four Mammoth employees were killed by gasses from this activity a few seasons ago.
post #41 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by michaelA View Post
St. Helen's probably put out a quite lot more ash than that, though it put out very little lava. It had a lot of pyroclastic flows down the side as well as plenty of ash sent over to Yakima (and elsewhere).
Yea, but my understanding is that the last eruption of the Yellowstone caldera left a layer of ash 6 feet deep ... in Iowa.

Mike
post #42 of 48
Scientists have found entire heards of extinct animals that were killed and buried in the ash from some of these eruptions.
They find the herd animals huddled together, the way they would have been in a blizzard.
This was in Nebraska:
"There was a definite pattern to the arrangement of the skeletons that emerged at the Ashfall site. Rhinoceroses were found first, at the top. Then at deeper levels, smaller hoofed animals such as horses and camels, and finally, birds and turtles. The latter were always found at the very bottom of the ash bed. Evidently the small creatures died first, then the middle-sized ones, and finally, the rhinos. The animals definitely did not all die at once and, with the exception of the birds and turtles, were not buried alive."

http://www.nebraskastudies.org/0200/frameset_reset.html?http://www.nebraskastudies.org/0200/stories/0201_0103.html
post #43 of 48

elephants

i think you guys felt all the republicans coming back to wyoming with dick cheny in tow, after they got kicked out of D.C.

about time they left the east coast. farewell republicans , enjoy your golf courses .
post #44 of 48
Here's a great earthquake map the USGS produces.

http://earthquake.usgs.gov/eqcenter/recenteqsus/

It shows all quakes in the last 7 days. They're color coded for when they happened - past week, past day, past hour. Size of the dot indicates magnitude. The Jackson quake is currently on there, of course.
post #45 of 48
NZ is the other side of the pacific plate, on the 'Pacific Rim of Fire'. An earthquake of 3.8 does not even make the news here, cause they happen all the time. But that doesn't mean you ever get used to them, and they tell us we are overdue for the 'big one'. If there is activity over your way, chances are we have it too as we are on the opposite side of the plate, what goes up must come down.

The only commercial ski resorts in the north Island of NZ are on an active volcano, Mt Ruapehu. My ski pal Adrian was there one day when it erupted, not an experience he wishes to repeat. The ski areas had to remain closed for the season because it did not settle for a while. We only have a short season, about 3 months, so between relying on mother nature to give you snow as well as not erupting underneath you can be a challenge for any business in the ski industry. Many did not survive missing a season.

If you are interested
http://www.mtruapehu.com/winter/volcanic-activity/
http://url.co.nz/resources/ruapehu/25Sept2007.html
http://www.powderhound.co.nz/volcano.html

the skiers have to worry about lahar's as well as avalanches taking them out on the slopes....
http://www.geonet.org.nz/news/archiv...ling-trip.html
post #46 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob Peters View Post
This whole subject encouraged me to fire up the google machine to look up a little more info about the Yellowstone supervolcano.



This is just fascinating stuff.
Bob - I really enjoyed the book "A Short History of Nearly Everything" by Bill Bryson. Chapter 14 covers this topic in some detail. As the title suggests, the rest of the book covers a little bit about nearly everything else... a good read.
post #47 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by mengel View Post
Bob - I really enjoyed the book "A Short History of Nearly Everything" by Bill Bryson. Chapter 14 covers this topic in some detail. As the title suggests, the rest of the book covers a little bit about nearly everything else... a good read.
Great book.
post #48 of 48
+ 1 for the Bill Bryson book
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