New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Bode in trouble over boots

post #1 of 10
Thread Starter 
Skiing: Bode Miller gets boot over bad boots

Home » Sport » Other Sports
Wed, 7 Jan 2009 Skiing

Click photo to enlarge
Bode Miller of the United States speeds down the course during the first run of an alpine ski, Men's World Cup Slalom race first run, in Zagreb, Croatia, on Sunday, January 6. Photo by AP.

Bode Miller was disqualified after the opening run of a World Cup night slalom on Tuesday because the soles of his new ski boots were a mere 0.2 millimeters too high. Miller, the defending overall World Cup champion, finished 29th and was more than two seconds behind leader Jean-Baptiste Grange of France before the International Ski Federation pulled him out of the competition.
"His boots were 0.2 millimeters too high, that's it," said Forest Carey, the head coach of Miller's independent ski team.
"It's black and white, the rules are clear so nothing we can do about that."
Miller's boots were tested in a random routine check by FIS officials that usually takes place between runs. FIS rules limit the height of ski boots to 34.3 millimeters because knee injuries often occur when boot soles are higher. Miller's boots were 34.5mm.
"Bode switched boots this morning, he got a new pair," Carey said.
"He is very disappointed that he can't race the second run. It's a night race, lot's of people out there, so he was fired up."
Carey said Miller was not aware he was racing in illegal boots and did not intend to cheat.
"Of course not," Carey said.
"Bode has been tested 380 times in his career so no way he would take any risks."
Miller is expected to stick with the boots, albeit with a slight adjustment.
"For the guy from (equipment supplier) Head it's a matter of five minutes to adjust the height," Carey said.
"I won't blame anyone in our team in public, but we'll have some words tonight for sure."
In December 2005, Miller was fined 999 Swiss Francs ($NZ1610) for refusing to hand over his ski boots for the regular FIS inspection after the opening leg of World Cup slalom in Kranjska Gora, Slovenia.
Miller had missed out on qualification for the second run then.

http://www.odt.co.nz/sport/skiing/38...over-bad-boots
post #2 of 10
Did they measure them warm, or cold?
post #3 of 10
Pretty clear that the techs' screwed up on this. I assume that they have some device that they've built to test this tolerance. If you're going to be one one-hundreth of an inch off, best to have it in the right direction. If he'd been in third instead of 29th after the first run, Forest may not have been in such a light hearted mood. Interesting question about the temp. I've heard that there are only a few of these machines to test the boots in FIS's possession. My guess is inside, warm.

One thing's clear. No intent to cheat; I'd agree with that. I think that all of the men are at the limit on boot height and stand height. One one-hundreth of an inch won't do much!
post #4 of 10
They are approx. 0.58% too tall.

I wonder if the device that is used to verify the boot heights is itself calibrated to such a tight tolerance?
post #5 of 10
The devices I believe were built by Atomic and are very specific as to how many Nm's of pressure they exert on the inside of the footbeed on the heel cup. they are extremely closely calibrated i have been told.

the meaasurement is from the inside of your footbed where you heel sits to the bottom of the sole. In the old days you could be 50MM, then it went to 45mm. I confirmed that for '08-'09, 43mm for WC men & women is the limit from the boot sole to the footbed at the heel. Where did they get this 34.3 MM in that article? .2 mm too high would be 43.2mm not 34.3????
post #6 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by krp8128 View Post
Did they measure them warm, or cold?
Cold. There's small "tent" next to exit of finish area where they measure this stuff (boots, skis...). So when skier comes out of finish area, FIS official takes his stuff does the check, and hand equipment back to skier.
From this what I saw (and as photographer we are normally positioned quite close to exit of finish area) pretty much everyone in second run get tested.
post #7 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by Atomicman View Post
The devices I believe were built by Atomic and are very specific as to how many Nm's of pressure they exert on the inside of the footbeed on the heel cup. they are extremely closely calibrated i have been told.

the meaasurement is from the inside of your footbed where you heel sits to the bottom of the sole. In the old days you could be 50MM, then it went to 45mm. I confirmed that for '08-'09, 43mm for WC men & women is the limit from the boot sole to the footbed at the heel. Where did they get this 34.3 MM in that article? .2 mm too high would be 43.2mm not 34.3????
In that case, the tolerance of the boot is less that 1/2 a percent.
post #8 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by primoz View Post
Cold. There's small "tent" next to exit of finish area where they measure this stuff (boots, skis...). So when skier comes out of finish area, FIS official takes his stuff does the check, and hand equipment back to skier.
From this what I saw (and as photographer we are normally positioned quite close to exit of finish area) pretty much everyone in second run get tested.
Yup. Mike Kertesz (FIS, Can) does most of the measurements. Really good guy (we went to the same public school, still see him a couple times a year at WC races - one of those small world things), well respected, and definitely not out to give the athletes a hard time in any way.
post #9 of 10
Nice. Thanks for the info.
post #10 of 10
Yes Mike is the man for this in men WC, while Andy Kronner is doing same thing in women WC. Both of them are really nice guys and it's cool to work (they are also doing media inspection) with these people. Well.. as long as you are not trying to be a**hole, then I already saw few people having big problems with them
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home