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Newbie here, just a few questions.

post #1 of 9
Thread Starter 
Ok well i have been skiing twice this year and i am hooked. Im pretty athletic. Where i ski it mostly slick icy material. its all fake snow but plan on going somewhere else in north carolina where there is more actual real snow. But im wondering when i buy a set of skis what would be a good beginner set to really learn on, needs to be double tip. also what boots should i buy. Im 5'10, 215lbs and wear a size 10 boot when i rent.

Also when renting skis should i say im a skill level 2 instead of 1 since i can stop and usually make it down the mountain with out falling. is there a difference between level 1 and 2 rental skis? thanks for any info. Hopefully next year i can spend some money and go somewhere nice and really rip it up.
post #2 of 9
No matter what they call it, it's not a skill level, it's a risk acceptance level. Are you willing to accept more risk of the binding not comming off when it should to lessen the chance of it coming off when it shouldn't. If so, go up a level. Unless you have very high skills it is hard to get a ski to perform with the binding set at level 1.

Were I you, I would just rent for a few more times and then buy an intermediate ski. Skip buying the beginner ski.
post #3 of 9
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ghost View Post
No matter what they call it, it's not a skill level, it's a risk acceptance level. Are you willing to accept more risk of the binding not comming off when it should to lessen the chance of it coming off when it shouldn't. If so, go up a level. Unless you have very high skills it is hard to get a ski to perform with the binding set at level 1.

Were I you, I would just rent for a few more times and then buy an intermediate ski. Skip buying the beginner ski.
thanks man
post #4 of 9
Invest in boots first. There is a lot of good basic information on the boot-buying forum and also in this one (you could use the search function). Basically, the boot to buy is the one that fits.

As for skis, pretty much any modern "all-mountain" ski of the right size and in decent condition will be fine at this stage. I'd keep renting until your skill level improves and you have a clearer idea of likes and dislikes.
post #5 of 9
^

YES! Go to a good ski shop and have yourself fitted properly for boots and build from there. Boots are the veritable foundation you'll be building your skiing skills on. Without properly-fitting boots, you'll be hard pressed to advance in your skill level. That and once you get some good boots, you can demo skis until you find one that has the feel you're after.

Take lessons if you can afford it. That's my major regret- I have never been able to afford instruction, my money always seems to get sucked up everywhere else first. Learn to ski the right way the first time and save yourself headaches down the line trying to un-learn bad habits.

Also skip the beginner skis. It's better to buy something you can grow into even if it's a little unwiely at first. You'll thank yourself next year and the year after that when you can still use them.
post #6 of 9
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by DoWork View Post
^

YES! Go to a good ski shop and have yourself fitted properly for boots and build from there. Boots are the veritable foundation you'll be building your skiing skills on. Without properly-fitting boots, you'll be hard pressed to advance in your skill level. That and once you get some good boots, you can demo skis until you find one that has the feel you're after.

Take lessons if you can afford it. That's my major regret- I have never been able to afford instruction, my money always seems to get sucked up everywhere else first. Learn to ski the right way the first time and save yourself headaches down the line trying to un-learn bad habits.

Also skip the beginner skis. It's better to buy something you can grow into even if it's a little unwiely at first. You'll thank yourself next year and the year after that when you can still use them.
thanks man that makes a lot of sense, the only thing i have ever been able to pride myself on is my self taught skills. Im not usually one for lessons though. I became a scratch golfer at the age of 14-17 being self taught and the only lessons i took, my teacher told my swing was perfect but my putting was sub-par. The same with basketball and my pitching coach said i had great form. So maybe its just pure athleticness or obsession but lessons dont seem to help most of the time. I will say for my third time out i made it down the green slope falling down only in the thicker/deeper snow where i would catch an edge everytime but i have learned to hockey stop quite often now so i figure i will learn sooner or later.
post #7 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by Crowder View Post
the only thing i have ever been able to pride myself on is my self taught skills. Im not usually one for lessons though.
Don't waste your keystrokes. This is not a place where people likes to hear you bragging about your self-teaching skills. This forum is called Barking Bears for a reason. Now, if you can post proof for your skills on a video clip...
post #8 of 9
Hi Crowder--welcome to EpicSki!

I agree with all who have suggested buying boots first, and waiting on the skis. And when the time comes, to buy good skis that you'll grow into, rather than "beginner" skis. Boots must not only fit well, they must also be set up properly. Everyone is built a little differently, and evolution has hardly optimized our build for the demands of skiing. Properly setup boots transform us from "people with our feet stuffed into poorly fitting boxes" into ... skiers!

Regarding lessons--you will not learn good technique or tactics without them. That much I guarantee. We are all self-taught, in the sense that whatever we do, it is our own bodies that must learn the moves, and they'll only do that through practice. And our bodies will learn and improve at whatever we "teach" them--whether that is good skiing habits or bad.

I once knew a self-taught "scratch golfer" who, despite his evident skill and talent, became frustrated that he was unable to improve beyond his admittedly already high level. He had reached a plateau, and finally decided it was time to take a lesson from a respected golf pro. The pro tweaked his grip and readjusted his stance slightly. Naturally, his performance declined! It took him a while to adapt to the changes, and then, finally, he reached the breakthrough that brought his game to a new level. His only regret was that he hadn't learned the good foundation from the start, and that he had had to go through the frustration of replacing bad habits with good.

That is exactly what will happen if you teach yourself to ski--or even if you learn from well-meaning "good" skiing friends (unless they are qualified, professional instructors). If you practice bad skiing, you will get "good" at bad skiing--like most people on the slopes. If you're athletic, you'll get good at bad skiing more quickly than less-athletic people. But the outcome will be the same!

If you're all right with becoming just another "terminal intermediate" skier, skidding all over the mountain, or carving out-of-control edge-locked arcs, you can do it! But if you really consider yourself an athlete, I would think that that fate would be something you'd prefer to avoid.

Do you know the difference between good skiing habits and bad? Do you know the pitfalls and traps that invariably lead people to develop bad skiing habits? No? You know what to do!

EpicSki can help you here, to some extent. Ask good questions and learn to filter the wheat from the chaffe. There is a wealth of information already here about the basics of good technique and tactics, and a number of instructors who will be happy to share their thoughts and experence. But nothing else can substitute for real lessons from a qualified, certified, instructor!

Best regards,
Bob
post #9 of 9
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob Barnes View Post
Hi Crowder--welcome to EpicSki!

I agree with all who have suggested buying boots first, and waiting on the skis. And when the time comes, to buy good skis that you'll grow into, rather than "beginner" skis. Boots must not only fit well, they must also be set up properly. Everyone is built a little differently, and evolution has hardly optimized our build for the demands of skiing. Properly setup boots transform us from "people with our feet stuffed into poorly fitting boxes" into ... skiers!

Regarding lessons--you will not learn good technique or tactics without them. That much I guarantee. We are all self-taught, in the sense that whatever we do, it is our own bodies that must learn the moves, and they'll only do that through practice. And our bodies will learn and improve at whatever we "teach" them--whether that is good skiing habits or bad.

I once knew a self-taught "scratch golfer" who, despite his evident skill and talent, became frustrated that he was unable to improve beyond his admittedly already high level. He had reached a plateau, and finally decided it was time to take a lesson from a respected golf pro. The pro tweaked his grip and readjusted his stance slightly. Naturally, his performance declined! It took him a while to adapt to the changes, and then, finally, he reached the breakthrough that brought his game to a new level. His only regret was that he hadn't learned the good foundation from the start, and that he had had to go through the frustration of replacing bad habits with good.

That is exactly what will happen if you teach yourself to ski--or even if you learn from well-meaning "good" skiing friends (unless they are qualified, professional instructors). If you practice bad skiing, you will get "good" at bad skiing--like most people on the slopes. If you're athletic, you'll get good at bad skiing more quickly than less-athletic people. But the outcome will be the same!

If you're all right with becoming just another "terminal intermediate" skier, skidding all over the mountain, or carving out-of-control edge-locked arcs, you can do it! But if you really consider yourself an athlete, I would think that that fate would be something you'd prefer to avoid.

Do you know the difference between good skiing habits and bad? Do you know the pitfalls and traps that invariably lead people to develop bad skiing habits? No? You know what to do!

EpicSki can help you here, to some extent. Ask good questions and learn to filter the wheat from the chaffe. There is a wealth of information already here about the basics of good technique and tactics, and a number of instructors who will be happy to share their thoughts and experence. But nothing else can substitute for real lessons from a qualified, certified, instructor!

Best regards,
Bob
thanks
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