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Introduction to expert terrain - Page 2

post #31 of 48

who rates the runs?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Tahoegnar420 View Post
you joking calling a 25 degree slope a double black diamond?
Inconsistent ratings of ski runs causes trouble, as when an intermediate that has been handling black diamonds at one area goes to an area where black diamonds really are tough. Squaw doesn't even use the double black diamond symbol. The double was just an attempt to deal with rating inflation.
post #32 of 48
If it's really steep I still get butterflies.
If it's really narrow I still get butterflies.
If it's steep AND narrow hello hop turns!

I still start out conservative on the first time down something that looks pretty sketchy then push it a little more and a little more until I almost eat it. Nothing like that wow I almost crashed bigtime feeling. You know, like the feeling you get when you suddenly see police lights in your rear view mirror? I've skied since the mid 70s and the first time down a hairy trail or chute is almost as exhilarating as the first ride up the chairliift was when I was little. That's why I keep doing this!
post #33 of 48
so you are saying a 25 degree slope at one resort can be a green, while it can be a black at another?

Wouldn't the overall slope angle have to change for the slopes difficulty rating to change?

I am confused.
post #34 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tahoegnar420 View Post
so you are saying a 25 degree slope at one resort can be a green, while it can be a black at another?

Wouldn't the overall slope angle have to change for the slopes difficulty rating to change?

I am confused.
I doubt any resort would label 25 degrees "green", but there is no uniform standard for slope and rating. There are resorts with nothing over (or close to) 20 degrees that mark their steepest or narrowest trails as black or possible double black if they have a several others marked as black. It is indeed very confusing.
post #35 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tahoegnar420 View Post
so you are saying a 25 degree slope at one resort can be a green, while it can be a black at another?
Of course. There isn't a standard, it's up to the resort.

Quote:
Originally Posted by BushwackerinPA View Post
same way Big Emma is 28 degrees and a green run.
The top part of Big Emma should not be a green run, IMHO. There's always beginners on it falling all over the place.

Quote:
Originally Posted by crgildart View Post
I doubt any resort would label 25 degrees "green"
Big Emma *is* labeled green. I haven't measured how steep it is, but 25 degrees seems reasonable to me for the top part. The bottom part of the run clearly should be green though.
post #36 of 48
20 degrees should not be considered expert terrain. Resorts should use slope angles to rate these things.

I only ski in powder or corn, and don't ever get on anything less than 40 - 45 degrees.
post #37 of 48
my first true <> <> (<--attempt at double diamond) was when I was about 8 at Steamboat in Chute 1. Steamboat doesn't really have much in the way of steeps, but as a kid, this was the pinnacle for me. My dad took me to it after begging him, and I carefully made my way down it. My dad slid down it, cursing the whole way, and swore never to do it again. I loved it. That started my addiction, and the chutes at steamboat will always have a special place in my heart.

Since then, I've sought out all the steep resorts and skied all the steeps that they had to offer (that were open at the time): JH, Snowbird, Alta, Mammoth, Taos, Telluride, Crested Butte, Highlands, and the 'extreme' areas of all around mountains like copper, park city (jupiter), etc. Still would like to hit W/B, Silverton, Squaw, and Big Sky.

But, there's one run in all of those that haunts me... Corbet's. The only run I've ever turned away from. That day it was a 30' drop to get in, and the conditions were terrible with a hard wind crust and very choppy. I watched a guy drop in, stick his landing, but his skis literally stopped. He ejected, and went for a ride, nearly missing the wall. Thankfully, his skis followed him down, otherwise someone else was going to have to jump in to help, or he was going to have to hike up. Corbet's was closed the next day. Hopefully the next time I'm there the conditions will be better and I'll give it a shot.
post #38 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by BushwackerinPA View Post
there are 25 degree runs at stowe that make great scott look easy.
I've never skied at stowe, but I find that hard to believe. Please post pictures.
post #39 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by UtahPowderPig View Post
I've never skied at stowe, but I find that hard to believe. Please post pictures.

please post pics. I am having a hard time believing that one resorts 25 degree run is steeper than another.
post #40 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by crgildart View Post
I doubt any resort would label 25 degrees "green", but there is no uniform standard for slope and rating. There are resorts with nothing over (or close to) 20 degrees that mark their steepest or narrowest trails as black or possible double black if they have a several others marked as black. It is indeed very confusing.

Sundance at a-basin is probably around 25*, hell the upper part of the bunny hill at loveland is 20* and the blues in the beginner area average around 25* and have sections over 30*.
post #41 of 48

Slope ratings

Quote:
Originally Posted by Tahoegnar420 View Post
so you are saying a 25 degree slope at one resort can be a green, while it can be a black at another?

Wouldn't the overall slope angle have to change for the slopes difficulty rating to change?

I am confused.
No, there is no uniform standard. There is no way to
effectively have a uniform standard.

Resorts take their lowest 30% - label them green (that's why big Emma at bird is a green). Take the steepest 30% - label it Black. Everything in between is a blue.

You will also notice that all resorts (either on their website or trail maps or both) will specifically ask you not to compare slope ratings between resorts and that if you are unfamiliar with the resort - you should start from a green and work your way up.
post #42 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by crgildart View Post
I doubt any resort would label 25 degrees "green"
What I meant was 25* average top to bottom before run out. Heck the offramp of the lift is usually 25* but I didn't expect everyone to get that picky
post #43 of 48
Do trail ratings change w/ snow conditions? Cause there's a few powder chutes that no way I would try when it's Ice. I've skied a few DD runs at Alpine Meadows(Waterfall) and Solitude(Parachute). Wasn't a big deal in the right conditions.
post #44 of 48
Not an introduction but a refresher course at Whistler last January. Finally got the brown out of my shorts !!!!

Falcon_O aka Charlie
525x525px-LL-vbattach4631.jpg
post #45 of 48
My first "oh my God, I'm going to die" moment was when I fell down the West Cirque at Whistler. A little 6 foot drop in, but when I hit a little ice, my butt went back and my skis took off. Ended up ejecting out of my skis and slid on my back all the way down (watching boulders as I whizzed past them). Finally stopped at the bottom and a guy skied up to me and asked if I was ok. I said I was and he replied, "Thank goodness, because dude you were booking!!!"
post #46 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by UtahPowderPig View Post
I've never skied at stowe, but I find that hard to believe. Please post pictures.
they are in the TR thread, the steepest stuff we skied was 35 degree max but due to tighteness, bumps, variable snow, sticks, trees the vast majority of stowes off trail terrain is tougher to ski than great scott.

Heck listen to this.

Goat is much more of work out than Corbert's Couliar. Goat's only average 30 degrees max.

Great Scott can be done on a powder day in 4 turns by comparision.
post #47 of 48
As a 16yo, I remember skiing everything at Winterplace then taking a trip that spring to Sunshine Village for a week. Never skied powder but picked it up after a few falls.

Then hit some blacks and I remember being really nervous. By the end of the week, I was hitting double blacks, maybe not pretty but I was getting to the bottom! I always say I learned to ski that week.
post #48 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by falcon_o View Post
Not an introduction but a refresher course at Whistler last January. Finally got the brown out of my shorts !!!!

Falcon_O aka Charlie
That looks like fun. I assume Whistler based on your statement, but what run?
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