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Used a defogger towelet on goggles, mistake?

post #1 of 16
Thread Starter 
My son used a defogger towelet on his Oakley goggles a few weeks ago and it left a hazy residue on them. Is there anything that will remove this? Any suggestions? He's ready to buy a new pair, but I told him I would check with everyone here first. Thanks in advance.
post #2 of 16
It was probably a mistake. Better goggles have a permanently bonded anti fog coating. In general, anti fog products do leave a haze that needs to be buffed away. Try gently buffing with a microfiber cloth.
post #3 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by aschick View Post
Try gently buffing with a microfiber cloth.
Emphasis on *gently* and make sure it's a *dry* microfiber cloth. The anti-fog coating on Oakley's is fairly fragile when it's wet (this includes when they've spent a day absorbing fog and moisture, not just when they're literally dripping wet) but you can safely gently buff them with a cloth when they're dry.
post #4 of 16
"Higher Quality" goggles? I damaged my students Oaklys doing this very thing. A goggle that fogs and can't be wiped is USELESS. Don't buy Oaklys if you want to ski.
post #5 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by tetonpwdrjunkie View Post
Don't buy Oaklys if you want to ski.
...or Bolle, Smith, Scott, etc., etc., etc.

It happens to all of them. Knowing what to do and what NOT to do is helpful though. I've used Oakleys for years with no problems. Bolle as well. The only ones I've had issues with that I couldn't do anything about were my Scotts. Probably had something to do with the way they fit with my helmet, and wouldn't vent properly. Before I wore a helmet, I NEVER had my goggles fog even once.
post #6 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by tetonpwdrjunkie View Post
"Higher Quality" goggles? I damaged my students Oaklys doing this very thing. A goggle that fogs and can't be wiped is USELESS. Don't buy Oaklys if you want to ski.
That's how anti-fog coatings work. When wet they can easily scratch or rub off. Good goggles should not fog under normal use. You see goggles fog when there is warm air blowing up from the face, or blocked vents. That's why I strongly suggest using a goggle with front vents if you wear a helmet. I sweat like crazy, wear a helmet, and am the person you see with steam coming out of my pit zips. But my goggles don't fog.

If your goggle fogs when you go inside for lunch then it's best to wait for it to evaporate, or find a bathroom with a hand dryer and carefully dry it. If you get moisture inside during a fall then head inside and carefully blot the droplets with a tissue. Then head to the hand dryer.

Next time pass this on to your student: blot, don't wipe.
post #7 of 16
Never ever had a problem with my own goggles or any one elses. I've even used solvent to clean a pair of my old smiths after spray painting. I still submit if you can't wipe them... Their useless. Where are these hand dryers you speak of? Thats right! In the lodge... The skiing is on the hill. I don't have time for hand dryers.
post #8 of 16
OK, you're right. Oakley is the ONLY goggle that sucks.

If you clean them according to manufacturer's suggestion, they'll last years, as mine have. I've used various Oakley goggles since 1992 and have yet to have a problem. Wish I could say the same for the most expensive pair I owned, which were not Oakley.

Just sayin'...
post #9 of 16
tpj, you can wipe them, that's why they make the bag out of a specific cloth - so you don;'t have to carry a rag or bit of sandpaper with you.

More importantly, why were you wearing ski goggles when you were spraying?
post #10 of 16
I used a soft chami on the Oaklys. The same soft chami I have wiped dozens of goggles with, including mine. I was using the older goggles to spray with so I wouldn't get nasty paint and lacquer in my eyes. I'll also use them sometimes if I'm doing a lot of power sanding. I feel bad about damaging my students goggles. They were fogged to the point of uselessness. He also fogged mine when we switched. My Smiths with the sensor mirror lens are still ok after three years of hard use, including wiping with a chami when wet. I had a pair of Oaklys with a Plutinite lens years ago and loved them for a while. I was shocked at how quickly they scratched and became useless. But hey... If you like Oakly, thats what you should go with.
post #11 of 16
+$80? for googles that you can't wipe off after a wipe out. Worthless.
post #12 of 16
How often did you clean the soft chami? If you're like 80% of the people I know, they use the little bag or a lens cloth to clean lenses, but NEVER EVER think to clean the cloth that cleans the lenses. All these things are a micro-fiber. Micro-fiber picks up everything on the lenses and holds it. After using it for a while, you're just wiping (grinding, sanding, scratching) all that stuff in the cloth back on to the surface of that lense.

BTW - "plutonite" = polycarbonate. It's nothing special. Polycarbonate is the softest lens material out there, and is therefore very easily scratched, although some do have scratch-resistant coatings, which cannot be applied over the top of any other coating. With that said, it is VERY impact resistant (try to snap a poly lens), and is used in sporting eyewear for that reason - it's virtually shatterproof. The rest is just marketing hype. The more flexible the lens, the more likely it is to scratch, so ski goggles are very susceptable.

FWIW, I worked in the optical industry for 6 years, and about 3 of those were in a lab. I've got a little experience to back up what I'm saying.
post #13 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by slider View Post
+$80? for googles that you can't wipe off after a wipe out. Worthless.
It's closer to $80 for the replacement lens. My lens cloth is pretty clean I keep it in a little bag. It didn't scratch the lens as much as it seemed that it moved and smeared some sort of coating. I'm also not sure that the lens couldn't have been saved with a little TLC after the lifts closed. I'm sharing my experience here. Clearly I'm too careless or clumsy to work with a fancy piece of equipment like an Oakley goggle. I'm also too impatient to waste good skiing time in the bathroom messing around with a hairdryer. It's a long way from the Hobacks to the bathroom if you can't see. Please use whatever goggle works best for you. I'll still switch with you on the hill so you can get down if it goes wrong. I don't need to see too much to be able to ski.
post #14 of 16
Thread Starter 
Thanks to everyone for their input. My son skiied yesterday, but came in late, so I haven't talked to him to see if he was able to clear up his goggles. I will have him read all of the responses here so he can consider some different opinions and make an informed decision if he needs/decides to purchase a new pair.

Isaiah 52:7
post #15 of 16
The "haze" inside the goggles is not something that can be removed. It is micro scratches. This is a pretty common problem with Oakley's. Their goggles use a much softer inner lense and they try to get all of their retailers to tell shoppers to never, ever wipe the inner lense when the least bit wet. Most goggles companies suggest following this protocol as well but the problems are not as pronounced.

The plastic the companies use for the inner lense coupled with the chemical used to reduce fog partner up to make the inner lenses of the Oakleys rather fragile. Quite a few shops I know keep a lense or two that this has happened to sitting around the counter so they can warn buyers up front. I wouldn't neccessarily say that this is a quality issue as Oakley has known this for years but has not been inclined to change. According to some Oakley employees I know this is because they haven't found a combination of plactics and anti-fog chemicals that work as well.

The word from them is that if you get snow inside the goggle tap it out, let it completely dry then use the bag that comes with the goggle to gently dab the lense to remove smudges and marks.
post #16 of 16
Well this is a good heads up, You have to learn sometime
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